zizek.uk
Are liberals and populists just searching for a new master? | Žižek.uk
The rise of populism, nativism and nationalism in recent years has challenged perceptions of what ordinary people want from politicians. Some see the anti-establishment trend as a rejection of centralised power. Others suggest the real hunger is for a moral authority that appears to be lacking in today's capitalism. Among the latter group is Slavoj Zizek, a Marxist philosopher at the University of Ljubljana. He criticises the appeal of political correctness, questions the ability of markets to survive without state intervention and excoriates what he sees as the ulterior motives behind fair-trade coffee. His latest book, "Like a Thief in Broad Daylight", explores the changing nature of social progress in what he calls an "era of post-humanity". Mr Zizek responded to five questions as part of The Economist's Open Future initiative. His replies are followed by an excerpt from the book. * * * The Economist: What do you mean by "the era of post-humanity"? What characterises it?