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I'm Toast - Eat Your Words
to be toast – (a) to be finished, to be in serious trouble, (‘If Mum finds out we took the car last night, we will be toast’) (b) to be exhausted, like new parents are. We started a right old squabble¹ on Facebook by asking our British friends what they meant when they said they were “toast”. Half of them said they meant that they were in real trouble with someone else. And half of them said they meant they were knackered. And then they fought with each other about who was right. We say both sides are right. To say that you are toast, in the sense that you are in deep trouble, is more common in the States (and allegedly it comes from the original Ghostbusters movie – who knew?) [I thought it came from the old black and white gangster movies. Apparently the Canadians also lay claim – who knows? – Nicer Kate] whereas in the UK we are more likely to associate the idea of “being toast” with tiredness. Which makes it a doubly useful expression. Toast itself is a big part of the British table. Breakfast, lunch, tea, supper – it’s there, waving at you …