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How Do You Approach Planning for Easter? - Worship Matters
Kendall sent me this question: I think most of us feel the pressure to “pull out all the stops” for Easter, whether that means a drama, special choir number, special communion service, hired orchestra, etc. What are some ways you have sought to make the celebration of the Resurrection special at your church? Does your congregation and/or pastoral team do anything different to make that Sunday a more focused evangelistic outreach? Many non-Christians are more likely to attend a Sunday meeting on “special” days like Christmas and Easter. Reasons vary. It may be persistent family members or neighbors. It might be the big production the church is advertising. I’d think for many it helps alleviate the guilt they experience for not going all the other Sundays in the year. On a more profound level, they come because God is drawing them by his Spirit to hear the Good News of the Gospel. I’ve been blessed to serve with men who recognize the opportunities holidays provide for evangelism without feeling the pressure to “pull out all the stops” as can be our tendency. We do see it as an evangelistic opportunity and plan accordingly. These are some of the things I’ve done over the years: Introduce a new congregational song. Add a choir. Have one or more vocal solos. Use new arrangements of worship songs. Have someone share how they were converted. Make guests aware of other opportunities to learn about Christianity. Perform a five to ten minute drama that alludes to the meaning of the resurrection or portrays it. Use orchestral ensembles (strings, brass). Print up invitations a few weeks in advance. Shorten our meeting. As I look at that list, I realize there’s nothing particularly unique, although I still remember many of our Easter Sunday meetings and the impact they had. In any case, here are a few things we’ve tried to keep in mind when planning meetings like this. 1. We have nothing more powerful to offer people than the Gospel. If we’re most concerned about our creativity, our lighting, our talent, our “relevance,” or our cleverness, we’ve missed the point. It’s not that any of those things are wrong or unimportant. They’re just not the best thing we have to offer unbelievers who come through our doors on Easter morning. For that reason, we need to make sure that at some point we clearly explain our need for a Savior and God’s provision of His Son as the atoning sacrifice for our sins who has risen from the dead. Tell it plainly, biblically, and passionately. Most people are oblivious to the fact that their greatest need is to be reconciled to God. We have the privilege of telling them. What a joy! 2. Examine your motives. If we feel pressure about a special meeting, there’s a good chance we’re no longer serving in the strength that God provides (1 Pet. 4:11) and are hoping we’ll look impressive in someone’s eyes. But it’s possible to pursue excellence and creativity without being enslaved to them. We don’t have to put on the greatest Sunday service in history, in our lifetime, in our denomination, or in our area. We simply need to faithfully proclaim, in an understandable and appealing way, the greatest news the world has ever heard. 3. Use creativity wisely. Two things to remember about creativity. First, what you win people with is usually what you win people to. Second, creativity isn’t something we do – it’s a way we do something. And on Easter Sunday, that something is clearly communicating the significance and meaning of the resurrection. So our goal isn’t simply to impress and entertain – we want to instruct and educate. We want to be winsome, but we also want to win hearts. And creativity doesn’t have to be big, lavish, or complex. Simplicity can cause people to listen more carefully to what you’re saying. Oftentimes …