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Should Editors Give Trigger Warnings? | The Digital Reader
I was catching up with some reading of magazines I haven't had time to get to (for months), when I came across an article on trigger warnings at the university level ("The Coddling of the American Mind" by Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt, The Atlantic, September 2015, pp. 42-52). I am surprised at how different the expectations are today on a college campus than when I attended college 50 years ago. One examples given in the article was a demand by some law school students that "professors at Harvard not [...] teach rape law—or, in one case, even use the word violate (as in 'that violates the law') lest it cause students distress" (p. 44). Having gone to law school myself, I wondered how that would work. How could a professor ignore the subject of rape or abuse (spousal or child) in a class on, for example, criminal law, criminal procedure, or constitutional law? How will these future attorneys make it in the real-world practice of law where "violates" is a commonly used word? And what about their clients? How well would a rape victim (or a rapist) be served by a lawyer who doesn't acknowledge the word rape? But that got me thinking about editing. [...]