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Examining the Migraine-Stroke Relationship - The Stroke Blog
If a random sample of our population was challenged with describing a typical stroke survivor, what words would be used to construct such an image? I have actually asked this question of those around me in non-medical environments, curious as to what most people consider to be typical. “Paralyzed” is a common perception. “Slurred speech,” “unable to talk,” “can’t walk,” and “can’t move” are others. What I don’t often hear, though, is “refractory pain.” Strokes have been described as clinically silent, with the general perception being that a heart attack is painful, but a brain attack is not. The reality is – every patient is different, and every stroke is different. Strokes can be painless, or they can be excrutiating, unrelenting, and painful beyond anything imaginable. Over the coming months, I intend to write a series of posts addressing the issue of chronic pain following stroke – headaches, neck pain, scalp and facial pain, pain affecting arms and legs, thalamic pain syndrome. Pain can be quite prominent aftermath of stroke, especially in the younger stroke population. Often, these patients may have recovered well enough from a physical standpoint to receive numerous comments along the lines of: “You don’t look like you’ve …