northdenvernews.com
Growth in Number of Americans Citing No Religion May Be Slower Than Previously Reported
Americans continue to pull away from organized religion, but the rate of departure previously reported may not have been as abrupt as originally thought, according to research presented at the 104th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Sociologists Michael Hout and Claude S. Fischer of the University of California, Berkeley, find that the previous estimate of a doubling during the 1990s of the proportion of Americans with no religion probably started earlier than 1991 and doubled over a 14- or 15-year period. New data suggest that the trend continued through 2008, likely fueled at least partially by the growing number of Americans who were raised with no religion.