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An Amateur's Guide To Copenhagen | Hollieblog
Hello, and welcome to the first in a travel series called An Amateur’s Guide, where I, an amateur traveler, will give you a guide to all the places I’ve been and hopefully share with you some tips and tricks into getting the best out of your trips. While I may be an amateur (and very poor), I’m determined to visit as many places as possible, meeting new people, and exploring beautiful countries and cities that may not be as far from you as you think. I’m going to be splitting these posts into sections; In & Around, Doing Stuff, Good Views, and Sleeps, but also just talking about how beautiful and amazing each place is. Let’s begin with Copenhagen, Denmark! Nestled to the far east of Denmark on the Danish island of Zealand with Sweden and the city of Malmo only a stone’s throw away is Copenhagen, a quiet and beautiful city filled with green parks, cycle routes and picturesque, colourful buildings that make you feel like you’re walking through a fairy tale. This was my first trip with friends to a place I knew absolutely nothing about (going to Disneyland doesn’t count) and was eager to see what dipping my toe into travelling felt like. Copenhagen is one of the safest cities in the world, and is partly why I chose it as my first destination. It’s perfectly normal, as someone who’s never done something like this before, to feel unsure and unsafe about what you’re doing, especially since I usually go away with family members who know exactly what’s going on. I was responsible for myself, and despite being with friends (some I knew and some I didn’t), I was still embarking on something pretty big. A first, if you will. But Copenhagen did not disappoint on the safe part. In my opinion it’s actually quite a quiet city. Coming from an overcrowded country where there are people wherever you are always, going to a country with only 5 million people in it (as opposed to the UK’s 60 million) is like walking into slice of heaven. People were respectful and polite, friendly, and the city was easy to get around! In & Around So you’ve landed at Copenhagen Airport, or København Lufthavn; what next? Before you jump into a taxi or look for a coach, let me talk to you about the metro. Straight from the airport, the metro can take you into the heart of Copenhagen for a fiver to Norreport, a large station with links to trains as well as other metro lines. The metro tickets work a little differently than train/tube tickets, and have to be used within a certain time frame. You can pay extra if you need a little more time. And after that? I WALKED. Copenhagen’s attractions and things to do are so near one another that you don’t need to take any sort of transport again until you go back to the airport, unless you plan on going further into Denmark. I loved walking around Copenhagen, even if it was just to look around and not actually going into an attraction. The buildings are colourful and all have each individual character. Doing Stuff Ahh, the best part of your trip! The doing things! Despite visiting Copenhagen off season, there are still some great things to see and do, and one of the most common things you’ll find yourself doing is visiting castles and palaces. Right on the doorstep of our hostel was Rosenborg Castle which we unfortunately didn’t have a chance to go into, but on the hottest day of the year for Denmark, the gardens surrounding it were packed with picnic-eaters, cyclists and frizbee throwers. Of course, it wouldn’t be a visit to Copenhagen without stopping by to see The Little Mermaid statue (Den Lille Havfrue), situated by the waterside at the Langelinie promenade near Kastellet, a ‘star fortress’ which we nearly got stuck on top (there weren’t many exits). The Little Mermaid statue was one of the most ‘touristy’ attractions we visited, and included people literring and trying to climb on top of the statue despite signs saying not to. There were coach loads of people with selfie sticks and queuing for ice creams, and so if you want to visit this beautiful landmark but without the crowds, I’d suggest early morning or late evening strolls. Even when we visited off season, it was still crazy busy! The next is a two parter, with a palace and church opposite each other and available to you in a two minute walk from one to the other. Frederik’s Church (also known as The Marble Church) and Amelienborg Palace. The day before we visited either buildings, we were walking back to our hostel after an incredible walk around Kastellet and spotted Frederik’s Church’s dome behind a construction site. I was mesmerized even just by that small piece of it where the view was ruined by a crane. We googled it and decided that THAT was our next visit. And disappointed I was not. The church was, unfortunately, surrounded by building works, but it clearly outshone the cranes and giant skips nearby. Inside, we were told to be silent (or at least super quiet) out of respect, and were allowed to sit in the pews and look up at the beautiful artistry on the inside of the dome and make a donation when we’d done. Beautiful. Peaceful. Free. *thumbs up*. And across the road is Amelienborg Palace which, just as we arrived, began a procession of what may have been the changing of the guard, or just a fun a show for the gathering crowds. There were the playing of instruments and chanting so, who knows. It was great though! One of the biggest blunders of the trip was not being able to visit Tivoli Gardens, a theme park right in the centre of Copenhagen, considered the top attraction in the city. As we went during the off-season, the park was unfortunately closed and was opening the week after we were visiting (I …