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Massage: one of the few alternative treatments that is supported by fairly sound evidence
Having been frantically searching for a decent quality study reporting a positive result, I am delighted to announce that I might have had some luck. This study examined the effects of whole-body massage on knee osteoarthritis, compared to active control (light-touch) and usual care. Assessments were done at baseline and weeks 8, 16, 24, 36, and 52. Subjects in massage or light-touch groups received eight weekly treatments each lasting one hour, then were randomized to biweekly intervention or usual care to week 52. The original usual care group continued to week 24. Analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Five hundred fifty-one screened for eligibility, 222 adults with knee osteoarthritis enrolled, 200 completed 8-week assessments, and 175 completed 52-week assessments. The primary endpoint was the 'Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index'. Visual analog pain scale, PROMIS Pain Interference, knee range of motion, and timed 50-ft walk were secondary