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Some recommend acupuncture for infant colic, yet the evidence tells us that it 'should not be recommended'
Needle acupuncture in small children is controversial, not least because the evidence that it works is negative or weak, and because small children are unable to consent to the treatment. Yet it is recommended by some acupuncturists for infant colic. This, of course, begs the questions: Does the best evidence tell us that acupuncture is effective for infant colic? Are acupuncturists who recommend acupuncture for this condition responsible and ethical? This systematic review and a blinding-test validation based on individual patient data from randomised controlled trials was aimed to assess its efficacy for treating infantile colic. Primary end-points were crying time at mid-treatment, at the end of treatment and at a 1-month follow-up. A 30-min mean difference (MD) in crying time between acupuncture and control was predefined as a clinically important difference. Pearson's chi-squared test and the James and Bang indices were used to test the success of blinding of the outcome