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Constructive Critique For Free Amid The Chaos - The Passionate Photographer
It was a great day at PhotoPlus Expo yesterday–I saw some great work and met lots of old friends. Thanks to my SanDisk colleagues Peter Liebmann, Brian Pridgeon and Leelianna Fazeli for making it all possible. Essential to our development as photographers is putting our work out into the world and seeking out opinions and critique we can use to improve and push ourselves forward. Getting quality feedback on our work is very important but not always easy to find. Yet finding people who can articulate their critique of your images in a way that you can understand and use is essential to your development as a photographer. I will be at PhotoPlus Expo tomorrow at the SanDisk Booth to give you my opinions about your work between 2 and 4 pm. It’s great to hear nice things about your photos from friends, relatives & fellow photographers but pats on the back are less useful than meaningful constructive criticism. The most effective way to both give critique and understand the constructive criticism coming your way, is to have a grasp of critical thinking concepts to help you articulate what it is you say about photography and what others are telling you. There are no absolutes in photography by understanding your biases is important when others comment on your work because, if for example, you are a documentary-based or street photographer who likes to capture real moments with a minimum of interference by you, the photographer when shooting and in post-processing then you can take the suggestion of moving a head from one frame to another— off the table. Beginning in 2017, I will have a new course on Photo Critique and a new weekly show as well on Lynda.com. I will develop your visual vocabulary not only for you to get the most from what other people are saying about your work but also to ask the right questions to get information you can use to grow as a photographer and make your work better. It’s about making judgements when looking at your own work and being able to articulate about and defend your choices. But remember, there is what I call “The Jazz Factor”. This isn’t math or science. Evaluating an image is a creative and personal call where intuition and gut instinct play big roles. It’s not a democracy either, your opinion counts the most. But in my experience the strongest...Read On...