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The economics of burkas, bikinis & The Nice Guys
According to a recent BBC World Service programme about Malawi, the nation's population hit 17.6 million this year and is expected to double by 2040, which the country's finance minister described as "scary". "A ticking timebomb of poverty and starvation," said the reporter. "Malawi desperately needs economic growth." Malawi has one of the highest incidences of child marriages in the world and last year introduced a new law raising the marriage age to 18. Changing the law doesn't by itself change cultural norms fast, but plenty of evidence shows that when women get educated and when countries get richer, birth rates drop very fast. Take Italy – Catholic, still very traditional in its attitudes to women - described not long ago by the Financial Times no less, as the "country that feminism forgot", it has one of the lowest birth rates in Europe. Economic growth is still widely cited as a neutral champion of women's rights. But now I find myself asking whether the cultural prejudices that see an enduring pay gap between men