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Rural Towns and Villages Pay the Price of Police Cuts
It’s no surprise that in the recent National Rural Crime Survey nearly two-thirds of respondents thought that the police weren’t doing a good job and felt less safe as a result. Government soundbites say the police “must do more with less”. The “less” refers to less funding, but the truth is it actually means fewer police officers. More than 12,000 front-line officers in fact, with at least another 15,000 to go over the next two years. That’s on top of 35,000 departing civilian staff, whose work needs to be covered by officers.The knock-on effect is that police have to put much smaller numbers of officers where the demand is greatest, just to cope with crime and disorder in the cities, towns and sprawling estates. The glaring consequence of this, of course, is that it makes rural areas ripe for the picking.Read the rest of Mike Pannett's article in Yorkshire Post.Mike Pannett is a former North Yorkshire police officer turned best-selling author on rural life and policing. His new book Crime Squad is due to be released later this year.Source: www.yorkshirepost.co.uk