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How the Ancient Maya Adapted to Climate Change - NBWW | Nichols Brosch Wurst Wolfe
Instead of focusing on the civilization’s final stages, looking at Mayan adaptations shows how their communities survived for as long as they did. Kenneth Seligson This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.Carbon dioxide concentrations in Earth’s atmosphere have reached 415 parts per million—a level that last occurred more than 3 million years ago, long before the evolution of humans. This news adds to growing concern that climate change will likely wreak serious damage on our planet in the coming decades. While Earth has not been this warm in human history, we can learn about coping with climate change by looking to the Classic Maya civilization that thrived between A.D. 250–950 in Eastern Mesoamerica, the region that is now Guatemala, Belize, Eastern Mexico, and parts of El Salvador and Honduras. Many people believe that the ancient Maya civilization ended when it mysteriously “collapsed.” And it is true that the Maya faced many climate-change challenges, including extreme droughts that ultimately contributed to the breakdown of their large Classic Period city-states. However, the Maya did not disappear: Over 6 million Maya people live mainly in Eastern Mesoamerica today. What’s more, based on my own research in the Northern Yucatan Peninsula and work by my colleagues throughout the broader Maya region, I believe Maya communities’ ability to adapt their resource-conservation practices played a crucial role in allowing them to survive for as long as they did. Instead of focusing on the final stages of Classic Maya civilization, society can learn from the practices that enabled it to survive for nearly 700 years as we consider the effects of climate change today. Adapting to dry conditions The earliest villages in the Maya lowlands date as far back as 2000 B.C., with several large cities developing over the following 2,000 years. A combination of factors, including environmental changes, contributed to the breakdown of many of these large Preclassic centers after the start of the first millennium A.D. Read on HERE >>>> Source: CityLab How the Ancient Maya Adapted to Climate Change