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Herbert Bayer: creator of the Bauhaus' universal typography - NBWW | Nichols Brosch Wurst Wolfe
Herbert Bayer created the Bauhaus’ typographic identity. We explore how the Austrian designer’s lettering became synonymous with the school. Jon Astbury Herbert Bayer created the Bauhaus‘ typographic identity. As we continue our Bauhaus 100 series celebrating the school’s centenary, we explore how the Austrian designer’s lettering became synonymous with the school. True to form, perhaps the most mythic typeface to come out of the Bauhaus, Universal, was one that strove to be as idealistic as the school itself. The inclusion of an upper case was deemed unnecessary – it being, among other things, a waste of time in both the production and use of typewriters. Serifs too were abandoned in pursuit of something as crisp as architecture’s International Style. The creator of this type and many others was the prolific Herbert Bayer, not only a typographer but what MoMA has called an “artistic polymath”. Bayer was a huge proponent of the Bauhaus – drawn in by Walter Gropius‘ original manifesto and Wassily Kandinsky’s writings – who would later go on to not only study but also teach at the school. Read the full story HERE >>>> Source: Dezeen Herbert Bayer: creator of the Bauhaus’ universal typography