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When Is Insurance Not Really Insurance? When You Need Pricey Dental Care | Black Voice News
By David Tuller I'm 61 years old and a San Francisco homeowner with an academic position at the University of California-Berkeley, which provides me with comprehensive health insurance. Yet, to afford the more than $50,000 in out-of-pocket expenses required for the restorative dental work I've needed in the past 20 years, I've had to rely on handouts — from my mom. This was how I learned all about the Great Divide between medicine and dentistry — especially in how treatment is paid for, or mostly not paid for, by insurers. Many Americans with serious dental illness find out the same way: sticker shock. For millions of Americans — blessed in some measure with good genes and good luck — dental insurance works pretty well, and they don't think much about it. But people like me learn the hard way that dental insurance isn't insurance at all — not in the sense of providing significant protection against unexpected or unaffordable costs. My dental coverage from UC-Berkeley, where I have been