inmontreal.com
Growing up, I was one of three children. My father worked a lot so my mom was the mainstay in the family. And then when he turned 60, he had a revelation where he wanted to change his ways. Up until 60 he was all about earning a living, providing for his family, and having something to leave behind. And then on his 60th birthday, he decided that he’d rather not leave so much behind and enjoy everything now instead. So the whole family has been to Costa Rica together, on a cruise, and we go up north to our country house in Saint-Agathe all 20 of us. My father has set the example of enjoying life before it’s gone. | In Montreal
Growing up, I was one of three children. My father worked a lot so my mom was the mainstay in the family. And then when he turned 60, he had a revelation where he wanted to change his ways. Up until 60 he was all about earning a living, providing for his family, and having something to leave behind. And then on his 60th birthday, he decided that he’d rather not leave so much behind and enjoy everything now instead. So the whole family has been to Costa Rica together, on a cruise, and we go up north to our country house in Saint-Agathe all 20 of us. My father has set the example of enjoying life before it’s gone. At his 70th, my sister, my brother, and I decided to do a bus tour of my father’s life. So the immediate family went on this bus and started at my father’s childhood home. He had a microphone during the whole tour, and the kids were listening to my dad talk about his childhood. That experience was altering for all of us, because when you’re busy raising a family and working—my husband and I work very hard and we have four kids—you kind of forget what’s important. History is important. How you become who you are is important. My father was a very successful man but never graduated high school. It’s important for the kids to see that and know that you can do anything—not just what someone tells you to do.