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Where do Coffee Beans Get their Flavor Notes?
As a coffee farmer, I'm compelled to share Where Coffee Beans get Their Flavor Notes. I'll try to keep this as clear as possible. No attempt at being pretentious here either. Coffee is just very complex, arguably the most complex food humans ingest (roughly 1500 chemical compounds in your cup). What influences the nature and make up of these constituents?1) Terroir - The land (soil composition, pH), water composition, the amount & timing of precipitation, temperature, elevation, latitude, shade / sun, etc.2) Cultivation - Fertilizer regimen / nutrition (organic, biodynamic, synthetic, etc.), irrigation, pesticides / herbicides / fungicides, etc.3) Varietal - Like wine (pinot noir, cabernet, etc.), coffee has varieties: typica, caturra, bourbon, gesha & hundreds more. These varieties have different characteristics (aroma, flavor, body, acidity) that change in response to 1) and 2).4) Harvesting - Coffee is a fruit. What's sweeter: green, unripe bananas or yellow, ripe bananas? The same applies to coffee. There are different colors of ripe coffee, but ripe coffee will be sweeter, cleaner & smoother if properly grown, harvested, processed, roasted & brewed. (We teach everyone to only harvest when it's ripe). 5) Processing - This is perhaps one of the biggest factors determining flavor & aroma. Three main techniques are used: wet / washed, semi-wash / honey, & natural / dried-in-the-fruit. - The wet method tends to showcase acidity & terroir. The coffee seed (bean) is
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