Along with the hair cutting tip, here’s a few suggestions on some money-saving stuff for food.

  • Milk with higher fat content lasts longer. I was getting skim milk for the longest time and it would always go bad before I finished it. If you have this problem, get 2% instead. It’ll last at least a week longer. Natural fats in foods like cheese and milk are probably way better for you in the long run than processed sugar.
  • Speaking of processed sugar… despite being sold as a “health food”, those yogurt cups have crazy amounts of sugar in them. For women, it’s recommended that you consume no more than 24 grams of sugar a day, and one yogurt cup will put you at that level or past it. Instead, buy a big tub of generic plain yogurt and buy a big bag of frozen fruit and just mix them together in a blender. It is cheaper to buy the processed cups of yogurt in the grocery store, but if you’re anal about your sugar consumption, this is the cheapest way to get around it. You don’t have to buy fresh fruit, thus saving on the cost, and a bag of frozen fruit will last you about two weeks, depending on the size. And it won’t go bad!
  • Grab bread from discount bins if you can. It’s usually marked down a lot, and if you have access to a toaster oven/toaster, even somewhat hard bread can soften and be consumable for another day or two.
  • Frozen produce is nearly as good as fresh produce at half the cost, and it lasts for months.
  • Iceberg lettuce has very little nutrition and is mostly water. Buy red leaf lettuce if possible - it has the highest nutrition content. Lettuce is known to have a very low shelf life, but there’s a way to prolong it. Fill a bowl that the lettuce will fit in with about a half inch to an inch of water. Cover the lettuce with a plastic bag and place it in the bowl. Put it in the fridge, and it will double or triple the lifespan of the lettuce. Lettuce wilts because there’s no water, and by putting it in a bowl with a plastic bag over it, you’re keeping it hydrated.
  • Cooked rotisserie chickens are cheap, tasty, and easy. You can tear off pieces for sandwiches or other recipes, and there’s about enough to last one person a whole week.
  • Not sure of the science on this, but I literally use the spices I buy for years. There may be some loss of flavor, but not enough to make it worth buying new spices every time the old ones expire. I’ve never seen any of my spices get moldy or spoiled. Remember that expiration dates are made up by the company that sells products, and it’s their best guess. There’s no real rhyme or reason to them, so usually products can last much longer than expiration dates claim, especially dressing, sauces, or anything with vinegar in it. I think I still have, like, five-year-old barbecue sauce, and it still tastes the same.
  • My mother always uses the plastic containers that yogurt and ricotta cheese comes in as her Tupperware. Drove me crazy, but if you really can’t afford Tupperware, it’s one option.
  • If you have any kind of porch or patio (or even very bright window sills), grow some of your own herbs, like basil or rosemary. Then, if you can’t use it all, pick it and set it out to dry in the sun. Once all the moisture is gone, crumble up the dry leaves and use it that way over the winter. No waste!
  • Lastly, when you’ve got meat drippings, pouring them down the drain can screw up your plumbing, because it hardens and creates blockage. Instead, put your drippings into an old empty can of beans. Put it in your freezer and leave it there until you’ve filled it up. Then just throw it in the trash. Or, as my mother does, use it to make gravy or other sauces.