~lascaux

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Centre International d´Art Pariétal Montignac Lascaux in Dordogne

The Vézère valley in Dordogne, France, is a mecca of prehistory. It contains about 15 major sites, all on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The Lascaux cave has one of the most important groups of Paleolithic rock wall art, both by its number and by the exceptional quality of its works. The Lascaux IV project designed by Snøhetta in collaboration with Associate Architect SRA Architectes and exhibition designers Casson Mann, is in line with the decades of reflections and initiatives focused on reconciling the safeguarding of a heritage that is unique for the history of humanity.

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In which John Green considers the historical distance between Rome’s Pantheon, the cave paintings at Lascaux, a different community’s cave paintings at Chauvet, and the current day. Too often, we think that a hundred years, or a thousand, can tell us the whole story or history or art history. But cave paintings remind us that what we think of as history is a tiny fraction of the human story.


Werner Herzog made a beautiful documentary about the Chauvet paintings called Cave of Forgotten Dreams. It’s worth checking out for much more info on the paintings at Chauvet and the people who made them: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1664894/

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(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqJ_eE6t0S8)

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Chauvet Cave, located in southern France, is a cave that contatin the earliest—and best preserved cave paintings in the world. The images are from the Upper Paleolithic period and are at least 37 000 years old, but aside from the intricate paintings, the cave was also discovered to contain the fossilized remains of various extinct animals and plants.

One of the larger cave painting sites, Chauvet Cave is embedded into limestone cliffs and the sheer quantity of paintings and artwork is in itself spectacular, nevermind the size and quality of the pictures (which are themselves remarkable). What the images depict is also unique compared to other finds of this nature. As opposed to specifically painting typical herbivores (likely the quarry of prehistoric human hunters), the cave also depicts predatory animals as well, such as cave lions, panthers, bears, and hyenas. All told, there are at least 13 different species depicted in the paintins, including rhinoceroses. These images do not exist outside of context, however, and many of them depict complex scenes or interaction between species and other artistic and more abstract depictions (such as red ochre reliefs of hands, and other lines and dashes).

Chauvet Cave recently re-entered the public eye just this past March when a researchers recently claimed that the cave depicts various volcanic eruptions and that such paintings are the first time humans recorded and depicted those eruptions in history. Splashes of red ochre and what appears to be an impromptu dive into deeply abstract imagery (a notable departure from some fairly realistic animals) would seem to support this hypothesis.

The cave is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but unfortunately has been off limits to the public since 1994. As with the caves in Lascaux, frequent human activity inside the cave slowly cultivated a species of mould which could have damaged the paintings. A replica was opened to the public in April, 2015.

Cruise shows, the most exciting shows after Haute Couture. Why do we love Cruise shows so much? Because they remind us that summer is very very near, the locations are remarkable and the designer’s creativity is on extremely high level. For its Cruise 2018 show, Dior went full Western.

The location was Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve in Calabasas, California. You know the place where that movie, Gone With The Wind, was filmed. Everything about this collection payed homage to American history, especially Los Angeles’ past. While wearing Lascaux Caves’ animal paintings on their bodies, Maria Grazia Chiuri’s girls invite us to play a game of cowboys and Indians. I’m in, would you join us?

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Photo: Jonas Gustavsson / Indigi

Yours fashionably, MDior Cruise 2018 Cruise shows, the most exciting shows after Haute Couture. Why do we love Cruise shows so much?
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Taurus, The Pleiades, and Orion’s Belt

Lascaux Cave Paintings, France, 10,000 - 18,000 years before present

The original illustration of the Taurus constellation, on the ceiling of the cave. Amazing to the see The Pleiades (represented as a group of black stars) above the bull’s shoulder, and the alignment of stars of Orion’s Belt in front of the bull’s snout.

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What I Imagine My Parents Did After Dinner

In our house, nobody ever danced,
even though my father played Elvis
or Johnny Cash from the silver
CD player that rested on the nook,
separating the kitchen from the dining room.
He labored over the stove,
his white apron hiding the same
Packers shirt he wore each Sunday,
while the football game blared in the living room,
his mood dependent upon who was winning.

My mother too followed routines,
her task to knead the dough,
until flour powdered her hands
and streaked her cheeks,
after she spent hours leaning over the table,
rolling macaroni through the machine.

I like to think that after we ate
two servings of pasta and meatballs,
a salad on the side,
after I helped them scrub pots and pans,
after they untied and washed the aprons,
and I closed my bedroom door to study
or practice guitar scales,
they put on the King or Johnny Cash again
and passed the pasta spoon back and forth
like a karaoke mic and danced around the kitchen,
while moonlight spilled into the kitchen.
—  Brian Fanelli, “What I Imagine My Parents Did After Dinner”
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We’re getting there. Today was a blow-off day at work (but still imaged 8 PCs and took 6 calls and prepped a box of tapes to go out). 

It’s going to be small and I will probably finish it on Saturday. The pattern was in Anchor but I converted to DMC and I’m not sure about how that’s going to work, but I can’t get Anchor easily. I’m sure it will look better when done, but I have a feeling it’s going to look a little muddy. 

Blue Lion Cave

Keith’s clue wall is one of my favorite things about the first episode. It drops a lot of interesting things/awesome artistic choices by the dev team. I ESPECIALLY love the cave painting. 

Clearly based on Paleolithic cave paintings such as the one in Lascaux and Chauvet France.

Lions in Chauvet caves painted circa 30k bc ^^^^ Yes, that’s well before the 10k years the blue lion was there HOWEVER, the paintings in Lascaux are closer in age. (off by like 2k years w/e)

There’s also this on Keith’s wall:

Clearly a representation of some sort about the Galra. But my art nerd senses only see these petroglyphs in Horseshoe Canyon, Utah that were also left behind by paleolithic peoples 7k-9k BC (which would work well for the 10k year timeline)

I just mostly wanted to shout out to the dev team/set dressers on Voltron for these awesome little things. 

A conventional depiction of the great god Osiris, eerily similar to Lascaux’s Apse painting, shows him lying on his back, penis erect, while Isis the owl hovers over his body, taking his sperm to engender Horus. In the Upanishads, the Hindu sacred texts, the soul is similarly depicted as a dove that flies away at death and may come back as a spirit. Centuries later doves and other white-winged birds came to symbolize the Christian soul, the Holy Spirit, and the visiting angels.
—  Dehaene, Stanislas. Consciousness and The Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts. NY, NY: Viking, 2014. 1-2. Print.