zine distro

Welcome to the Hard Fifty Farm tumblr!

ABOUT THE FARM Based on the Hard Fifty Farm in rural Kansas, the Pioneers Press staff went “back to the land” in 2010 after stints in San Diego, CA, Norfolk, VA and Portland, OR. As beginner homesteaders and self-identified “farm punks,” they raise a variety of crops as well as care for an ever-growing group of rescue animals, including sheep, goats, chickens and ducks, all of which are supported entirely by Pioneers Press sales.

ABOUT PIONEERS PRESS Pioneers Press is a publishing house and small-press distro focusing on survival and sustainability on the farm and in the city, in addition to health, gender, sexuality, social justice and food movements, and literary works by up-and-coming authors. Since its launch in 2012, Pioneers Press has consistently produced titles that have made the best-seller lists of independent bookstores all over the world, including Powell’s Books #1 best-selling small press title of 2013 and 2014 (Adam Gnade’s The Do-It-Yourself Guide to Fighting the Big Motherfuckin’ Sad).

Introducing Gaybro, a distro for nontraditional queer boys

I’ve never run a distro before. I’ve never even thought of selling my own zines. But seeing as there are distros for every niche interest you could possibly think of, I’ve decided to open mine just as a pop-up shop in the winter of next year.

ATTENTION ALL QUEER BOYS (CIS and NON-CIS)

I want your zines!

If you’re looking to find a greater audience for your work, I can take your zines on consignment and sell them here in beautiful Portland, Oregon and on the Internet.

I really want zines that address the following

  • growing up gay
  • coming out
  • being in a nontraditional body (fat, skinny, muscular, femme, &c)
  • growing up gay as a person of color
  • being trans or generally non-cisgendered
  • zines about place, time, memory
  • zines about being bicultural or bilingual
  • being a poor gay person (aren’t we all?)
  • fiction/perzines
  • poetry chapbooks
  • assorted claptrap
  • pillow books (like my own zine, Galván in Portland)
  • anything else you can think of!

At some point I want to start selling the pretty things you make, too. Stickers, patches, buttons, and the like. And of course I’ll be selling my own zine, Galván in Portland!

You should totally anon me or send an email to joe@daelis.com. I’m looking for advice from well-heeled disto owners on how to maintain a distro. I really want to give voice to non-white, non-trad queer guys like myself who feel a need to advance their own agenda want to be part of a conversation about race, class, gender and sexuality in a welcoming way.

Email: joe@daelis.com

Or, conversely, drop me a line (or send your zine!) to:

Joe Galván

6300 Barclay St.

West Linn, OR 97068

Hey all! picassopixie and theseareclosequarters have come up with the idea for a zine where all the work gets submitted via text to a Burn Phone. This method seems quick and easy it can also be anonymous.

Please send us your poems, writings, pictures, and other art to (720) 507-4088. We’re working on putting the first issue together and will have a FREE digital download and physical copies available somehow.

Looking for queer mental health zines!

Do you identify as queer and write zines about gender or mental health? Make cool art? We want to distro you!

We’ll be at the following events and would love to table your zines/art:
portlandzinesymposium (for sure) July 18-19
thinkanddiethinking (hopefully!!) July 10-12
olympiazinefest (for sure) October 24-25

Contact us either here or via e-mail for more information. Our e-mail is queeranxietybabiezdistro@gmail ~~~

Open call for submissions to all zine makers, zine distros, comix makers, self-publishers, and independent artists to join the exhibition at Street Cat Zine Fest.

I got into radical politics when I was 15 years old, shortly after discovering punk music. At first I thought punk was just nihilism, misanthropy, self destruction, Sid Vicious. Then when I was 15 I got beat up by the cops; the experience changed my life. It was the 4th of July, Naples, Florida. Every year there’s a fireworks celebration down on the beach by the pier, at least there used to be. Small boardwalks connect the street to the sand. I had gone down early to meet up with a couple friends and I as I stood there on the boardwalk looking out into the sea of people trying to spot my friends, two police officers approached me. I was asked to get off the boardwalk, they said I was blocking the flow of traffic. So I did, I turned around and walked off the boardwalk back down onto the street.

Then the two officers approached me again telling me to get off the boardwalk. I told them I was off the boardwalk.
Next thing I knew one of the cops had grabbed me by the neck, twisted my arm behind my back and started dragging me over towards their parked cruiser. They slammed my face down onto the sun-baked trunk of the car., kicked my legs apart and started going through my pockets. Every time I tried to get my head up off the burning trunk it was slammed back down harder. After a long and immature verbal exchange, most of the immaturity being on my part (I think the words “fucking” and “pig” were used quite a lot if I remember correctly) they cuffed me and threw me into the back of the cruiser. The one cop stood there taunting me through the window until more officers showed up on the scene, at which point they pulled me out of the cruiser. My body went limp and I fell to my knees. Two officers pulled me up, one on each elbow, putting all my weight onto my cuffed wrists, my legs kicked out involuntarily, two other cops grabbed one each. They brought me around to the other side of the cruiser and dropped me face first into the middle of the street. One officer put a boot to my head, another put a knee in my back and then they proceeded to hog-tie me. I was then lifted up like a suitcase, held by an elbow and a leg and thrown into the back of a different cruiser.

When I got down to the station I remember the main officer who instigated the whole thing opening the car door and telling me he was going to cut my legs free, that if I kicked him he would put a bullet in my head. I was charged with Battery On An Officer and Resisting Arrest With Violence, two felony charges that I was convicted of despite my mother hiring an attorney that she couldn’t really afford. I know now it was a small injustice compared to other instances of police violence I’ve heard of over the years, I was just a dirty punk kid who walked past the wrong cops, but at the time I was more than outraged.

The experience politicized me. I dropped out of high school. I started doing a zine. I started a distro of political pamphlets and Anarcho-punk records. I started a Food Not Bombs chapter with a group of friends. We met other like minded people across Florida and started a radical activist network. We organized protests, we organized gatherings, workshops, participated in direct action. I was a Teenage Anarchist. When I was younger my opinions where very black and white, I was either for or against something, and that’s how I defined myself. A lot of those opinions where formed by social influence from the scene I was a part of, being younger I felt the need to belong to something, a group of people, I wanted acceptance. Over time I realized how some people use their positions of stature to pursue their own personal agenda’s, selling their own personal brand of self- serving revolution. This all being the complete opposite of what drew me towards Anarchism in the first place. I found that the people who professed the loudest that they were the most open minded individuals were in fact usually the most close minded. I feel like the revolution sold to me when I was a teenager by the punk scene, by the Anarchist scene was a lie. The real revolution was the political awakening. That initial spark that made me want to change the world. And that’s what I’m interested in, maintaining that fire. That’s what the song is about. I am an autonomous individual. I think for myself. I have no need to supplement my identity through belonging to a scene or exclusively endorsing any brand of political thought. And if anyone is offended by that I feel like it only reaffirms my conviction. For if it’s heresy for an Anarchist to say “FUCK Anarchy” then Anarchism is truly just another flag, and I say burn it along with the rest of them.

—  Laura Jane Grace

anonymous asked:

Sorry but could you explain what a zine is please?

Sure, I’m just cutting and pasting something I responded to on here months ago:

Simply put, zines are self published magazines. They are usually photocopied and stapled like a little booklet or pamphlet and have a small print run.They are generally made as a hobby as there isn’t much money in making or selling zines. In fact, a lot of zines are traded.

What you put in a zine is entirely up to you. You could write fiction, draw comics, write recipes, print photos you have taken, write your political beliefs, or write about your own experiences. You could stick to one genre or you could mash it all up together. I generally write what is called a “personal zine” that means I write stuff about personal experiences and tell stories and occasionally other topics show up in my zines as well. The contents of a zine are only limited to your imagination. Zines can be any size or shape but I’m a firm believer that they must be physical. I don’t consider ezines to be zines.

Some people that make zines consider themselves to be the progeny of the likes of Thomas Pain writing Common Sense, early 20th Century Sci-fi fanzine writers, beat poets and chapbooks, 70s punk music fanzines, and the 90s zine explosion including riot grrrl zines.

All of that just tells you what zines are physically.

I’ve been reading zines since the early 90s and making my own zines since the mid-90s. I was living in Salt Lake City, Utah on the cusp of the internet. I would trade zines with penpals through the mail and write letter and really get to to know the people behind the paper. This is where I get to the cultural aspect of zines. These connections could take you on a greyhound ride across the country to meet someone where you know their handwriting better than their face. There are conventions for zines called zine fests where people get together to trade, sell and display their creations and attend workshops and skill shares. Most of my friends are people that I have met through zines and the only thing I can really think that we have in common is that we all appreciate the written word. We celebrate the tangible and sometimes the ephemeral.

Some people talk about zines dying out after the internet and blogs became popular, but I don’t think that is true. There is still a very active and vibrant community of people creating zines and reading zines. the internet has just added a new dimension to zines and zine culture. it makes it easier to find other people that are interested in zines and easier to spread the word about new zines, zine fests, and distros (a hobby sort of business that sells a bunch of different zines)

In the context of this being my witchy blog I’d say that zines are a big part of my life and that blends into my witchy life because it is just another facet of me. I’ve also been kicking around the idea of writing a zine about witchcraft but I can’t seem to find the time to write my own zines these days let along sit down to do editing and reprint the book I wrote about zines, Stolen Sharpie Revolution. (I just reprinted it!)

Also, my day job, Portland Button Works, is running a business that makes custom buttons and sells our own buttons designs. It is also a zine distro and we sell lots of zines in my brick and mortar shop. When I travel, like when I was in Chicago and LA a few months ago, it is probably for a zine fest. I have friends all over the US and Canada and even some in other countries and it is all because of zines.

4

[imgs: 4 photos of Hoax Zine #11: 1) The front cover of the issue, which features a hand moving a chess piece across a warped chess board, 2) The table of contents listing for the issue, 3) The back cover of the issue, which features 4 profiles of individuals with written text overlayed on them, and 4) Issues #6-11 of Hoax set out next to one another.]

HOAX #11:  FEMINISMS & STRATEGY IS NOW TAKING PRE-ORDERS

+ What is Hoax? Hoax is an annual US-based queer feminist compilation zine that aims to create a space where we can voice our own truths. Each issue has a theme in tandem with feminisms. Contributors do not have to identify with a particular gender and/or as feminists in order to submit work to the zine. You can learn more about Hoax via links to our Mission Statement, Core Values, and Shared Goals, General Hoax FAQs, Submission FAQs, and Stipends for Submissions.

+ Why should I consider pre-ordering this zine? Due to the large amount of time between issues (Hoax #10 came out 15 months ago, in August 2014!) as well as the high volume of requests for copies that we receive from individual buyers, distros, independent bookstores, zine libraries, and zine fests, selling pre-orders allows us to accurately gauge how many issues need to be printed while raising enough initial funds to supply us with vital resources to get the zine out there! Also, more pre-orders means more money we can offer to the folks who made this issue possible! All pre-orders will include additional surprise goodies! :)

Essays in this Issue:

  • Moving through frustration, toward understanding limited/centred approaches to theory, practice, media, communication, organizing, etc; with the example of able-ist white feminism colonising non-western feminisms via cultural relativism, and thus displacing and alienating “other” feminisms
  • Poems centered on themes of perspective, inclusion, and interpersonal conflict as they relate to social change strategies
  • PrEP as feminist strategy and the failure of liberal feminism to address HIV as a feminist concern
  • Reflecting on macro-level racism, classism, and ableism faced while operating a disability program and its ensuing “inner-city colonialism” on the local community
  • An expression of burn out and disillusionment after years of doing direct service and organizing work
  • A short article on the subversive potential of using LGBT happy endings in romance novels and fanfiction as a way to imagine a new kind of future for queer life
  • Comparing and analysing a hierarchically structured women’s organization and an autonomous feminist collective in Belgium
  • Practices for finding motivation to get up in the morning and quieting the internal voices that tell us we are not good enough
  • Confessions about anti-violence organizing from the perspective of a social worker and survivor
  • Embracing alternative realities and fictive possibilities as a way to love across anorexic, schizophrenic, and spinster identities
  • Nurturing a relationship with a kid and thoughts on strategies from a long-distance “feminist godmother”
  • A piece that explores how making and self-publishing a zine helped the author gain confidence as a writer
  • Reflections on sexual assault and survivorhood in a victim-blaming world
  • A comic about a bus ride downtown to a ‘place without mirrors,’ where you can’t help but broadcast your dysphoria in the moment
  • Uncovering the hidden labor in feminist projects / zines and tips for creating and sustaining them without burning out or going uncredited for your unpaid work
  • An essay that discusses methods to combat shame and stigma when a friend or partner shares their STI status
  • Personal and historical analysis of challenges to organizing men against patriarchy, with strategies for moving forward
  • Interview with Jamila Hammami, Executive Director of the Queer Detainee Empowerment Project (QDEP)
  • A piece exploring the shortcomings of mainstream literature on polyamory that suggests bringing an intersectional political analysis to discussions of poly
  • A piece that dares to assert what feminism is and what it isn’t; from the perspective of an ever-learning 27-year-old feminist of color
  • Mental illness’ connections with temporalities of queerness, a call for communal responses and support, and fighting both socially- and self-imposed stigmas of being “too emotional”

This issue also includes feminists we love, current feminist heroes, and a vegan/gf recipe for tofu pot pie! The zine is ½ size, black & white, 80 pages, printed in English, and very text heavy.

+ Note about Triggering Content: We are circulating the above descriptive list in an effort to reveal the content and chronological order of this issue, thus creating the opportunity for readers to judge on an individual basis as to which essays could be potentially triggering or uncomfortable to them. We have chosen not to place trigger warnings on specific pieces in Hoax because we recognize that triggers are unique and highly personal. We believe that it is impossible to discern what content has the potential to be upsetting and/or triggering to every one of our readers, and we do not want to inadvertently create a hierarchy of what material is “intense” or “real” enough to warrant a warning. Please contact us if you have suggestions about how to better incorporate trigger warnings into future issues of Hoax.

+ Note about Pricing and Stipends: This issue costs US$3.50. All of the money procured for Hoax goes right back into the not-for-profit project. As mentioned above, pre-sales are vital for ensuring that we are able to give adequate stipends to our contributors. What we are able to offer for compensation will depend on the amount of revenue from sales and pre-sales, and will be distributed as soon as zines have been mailed. Although we cannot afford to pay very much (probably just enough to purchase a zine and a cup of coffee), we hope that offering a stipend, however small, will ensure that our contributors of the present and future know that their submissions are valued and appreciated.

If you are in a position to do so, we encourage you to donate money to overall Hoax operations via PayPal (our account is hoaxzine (at) gmail (dot) com), pay a higher fee for this particular issue, and/or purchase other available zines so that we can continue to work towards making Hoax readily available to those who cannot afford to pay higher than US$3.50 for a singular zine.

You can pre-order via our Etsy shop (for PayPal payments, where you can also find back issues on communication [this issue will be out of print in a month!], change, mythologies, vulnerabilities, and embodiments [all pictured above!] as well as some Hoax pins and many of our personal zines) or, if you prefer well-hidden US cash via snail mail, you can e-mail us at hoaxzine (at) gmail (dot) com to make arrangements. If you are interested in potentially becoming a contributor to Hoax, please check out our call for submissions for Hoax #12: Feminisms & Healing, which is accepting submissions until December 31st, 2015 (this deadline is flexible)!

+ Note about Mailing: We will be mailing out issues on a first-come, first-serve basis as soon as possible, optimally starting in EARLY DECEMBER – but our ability to purchase necessary mailing supplies and therefore send copies out depends on when we will sell enough zines to afford to get everything in the mail. As always, feel free to shoot us an email if you have any questions about the status of your order.

+ Note about Not Listing Contributors’ Names: We have included a screenshot of the Table of Contents above to safeguard our contributors from “being Googleable” while providing credit and transparency as to who collaborated on this issue. Content that is consented to appear in print is not automatically consented to be searchable online and respect for our contributors’ comfort, safety, and privacy is one of our priorities.

+ Other Ways to Support this Project: We’d love for you to submit content to future issues of the zine, come to an assembly party (held in New York City periodically), write a review about Hoax, recommend it to your friends and favorite zine distros, and/or follow our Facebook and Instagram accounts!

Happy reading, y’all! Please reblog to help spread the news!

In Solidarity,
sari (Editor) & rachel (Editorial Assistant) 

ashloftining-deactivated2014053  asked:

You've been making zines for a long time. How do you think the culture has changed since you began, and is it for better or for worse?

Oh, gosh. I have been making zines for a really long time, but I don’t know how to answer this question! Here are some changes I have noticed:

1. It’s more expensive to make zines, now. Photocopies and postage have both gotten ridiculously expensive over the past 20 years. On the other hand, it’s easier to make your zines available for free, because if you have access to a decent computer and the Internet, you can easily upload .pdf versions.

1.5 One reason it costs more: You used to be able to scam both copies and postage so much more easily. Now, almost every copy place uses some kind of prepaid card, so you can’t just lie about how many copies you made; postage-wise, as soon as they started using the sticker-stamps as opposed to the kind you lick, it became nearly impossible to reuse postage. Dang.

2. Maybe this goes along with things being more expensive - but more people seem to be treating zines like a business. I’m not talking about people who actually have zine-related businesses, like distros and zine shops, nor am I talking about people who charge enough for their zines so they can at least break even - I am in the latter category, because, as I said in #1, shit has gotten expensive and we can’t all afford to give copies away for free at shows, y’know? I guess I’m just talking about people who, like, make zines that are six pages long, and the pages just have, like 5 badly-photocopied photographs and one poem or something, but then they use cardstock for the covers and then charge, like, 8 bucks for the zine. It pisses me off because, first of all, some of us spend a really long time on our zines, craft them as if we’re writing books, and some of us write zines that are almost as long as books, and then these people charge ridiculous amounts of money when we’re still just trying to break even? And also: if you want to get rich, doing a zine is a really silly way to try and do that. Doing a zine usually has the opposite effect; it’s usually more like: “Do I eat this week, or do I make photocopies?” I don’t know where I’m going with this point. There have probably always been people who charged way too much for shitty zines. Some people think even charging for zines at all is a sell-out/capitalist move (those people have obviously never had to choose between zines and life necessities). Maybe I am just bitter because I thought that at this point in my life I’d be able to afford getting my zines professionally printed, a la Cometbus or Burn Collector, and I’m still stuck doing it all oldschool. Who knows.

3. Zines are considered to be more ‘legit’ now, but also…not? It’s like, on the one hand, if you become somewhat known for your writing, and people find out that you used to do a zine, they get all excited and want to publish an anthology of it or something. “Oh, see how s/he’s risen!” they say. “From poorly photocopied rants and record reviews to a real published book!” But on the other hand…if you’re still here, doing zines 20+ years later, no one’s going to just offer you a book deal. (Unless you’re Cometbus.) No, I’m not bitter at all!

4. Computers have become more prevalent in doing zine layouts. Some people still do all their zines by hand, with the aid of maybe a typewriter, and I admire those people, and yes, there is something to be said for the cut and paste aesthetic, and the tactile rawness of typewriter text or handwriting, and I love the smell of glue sticks in the morning but…even 15 years ago, I used a combination of computers and more analog tools in my zine-making, and now it has gotten even easier. I mean, now I can use my computer to make the text look like it was typed on a typewriter, but I still have the ease of editing that comes with a computer, and I can make my photos look all dot-screened Xerox art-style…but I don’t have to spend hours bent over a copying machine at the local office supply store? (Cos that isn’t even fun anymore, now that a. their photocopiers work just like scanners, so you might as well be on your home computer anyway and b. see point #1.5.) You mean I can use my word processing software to lay out all the text and graphics and print it all out like that and not have to get cramps in my hands from hours spent with scissors and glue? Sign me the fuck up!

5. The main difference has to do with the Internet. I’ve heard some oldschool zinesters and pseudo-luddites lament: “The Internet has killed zines! No one writes zines anymore, they write blogs! Where are the ziiiinnneeesss?” And, wow, have those people ever actually searched Etsy for zines, or checked out the #zines tag on Tumblr, or anything like that? Sure, some people write blogs instead of zines, and a lot of people write both, but, if anything, the Internet becoming what it is now has made it so much easier to find zines! Back in The Day, unless you were in a bigger city with a cool shop that sold zines, you had to read a review in, like Maximum Rocknroll or Slug and Lettuce or whatever, and a. take the reviewer’s word for it that the zine was good (this is not to discount the importance of zine reviews, but bear with me) and b. send 2 bucks to the address provided and hope that it would get there safely and that the zinester would actually send you the zine eventually and not just spend the money on beer or whatever. And there were zine distros, but you usually had to send stamps to get their catalog or something, and it was a whole lot more complicated. Now, now you can find zines everywhere, thanks to the Internet! It doesn’t even matter if you live in Bumfuck, Nowhere - if you have access to the Internet, you can find zines! And you can usually see pictures of them and read some excerpts! And if you have PayPal or a debit card, you can order them from Etsy or Storenvy or directly from the zinester, and you know that the money is getting there; same with the websites of zine distros and stores like Quimby’s - you can see their whole catalog online and order a bunch of zines at once! Furthermore, if you dig doing zine trades, the Internet has made that easier, too - you can email someone you want to trade with and say: “Hey, I do a zine too, interested in trading?” And if they say yes, you can exchange addresses, and you’re good to go. I don’t know, there was something special about spending hours scouring shops for rad zines (and records, this goes for records, too), and I still like to do it when I get the chance - but as far as I’m concerned, the fact that it’s easier for more people in more places to find zines (and cool music) now is a good thing, and zines are far from being dead.

Wow…this got really long. Apparently no one should ask me about zines, because I will ramble endlessly. To answer the second part of your question: are the changes for better or worse? Neither. Some things are better, some are worse, and overall, it’s just different. But zines (and print) are far from being dead, despite what some cultural alarmists/Grumpy Old White Dudes say. And: as much as I grumble about wanting a book deal and that I’m still ‘stuck’ doing zines, well - I do want a book deal, but even if I write a New York Times bestseller (haha, yeah right), I will still probably always do zines.

3

[imgs: The front and back covers of the zine Hoax #12 along with a screenshot of its table of contents.]

HOAX #12:  FEMINISMS & HEALING IS NOW UP FOR PRE-ORDERS

+ What is Hoax? Hoax is a US annual queer feminist compilation zine that aims to create a space where we can voice our own truths. Each issue has a theme in tandem with feminisms. Contributors do not have to identify with a particular gender and/or as feminists in order to submit work to the zine. You can learn more about Hoax via links about our Mission Statement, Core Values, and Shared Goals, General Hoax FAQs, Submission FAQs, and Stipends for Submissions.

+ Why should I consider pre-ordering this zine? Due to the large amount of time between issues (Hoax #11 came out in November 2015!) as well as the high volume of requests for copies that we receive from individual buyers, distros, independent bookstores, zine libraries, and zine fests, selling pre-orders allows us to accurately gauge how many issues need to be printed while raising enough initial funds to supply us with vital resources to get the zine out there! Also, more pre-orders means more money we can offer to the folks who made this issue possible!

Essays in this issue (chronological order):

  • A piece about 12 step groups and how they’re both helpful and harmful, and why the writer had to eventually leave
  • An informational essay about rape-related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) faced by military personnel and the importance of distinguishing it from combat-related PTSD
  • Dealing with issues surrounding trauma, alcohol use, and a lack of resources in an unhealthy and unsupportive relationship
  • A piece examining the author’s experiences and feelings about a Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) intensive program and the idea of recovery
  • How a sick femme mama is working through the misogynistic bullshit around taking care of others before she takes care of herself
  • A short comic story about a small surgery
  • Connections between personal experiences with grief over the death of a parent and being a survivor, and why the writer doesn’t talk about either anymore
  • Facing PTSD as a result of multiple suicide attempts and how the duality of passive / active personal choice impacts the writer’s feelings of not having a “valid” kind of trauma
  • A creative nonfiction essay documenting the process of writing poetry about the uglier parts of the past as a way to heal from it
  • Gaining awareness and perspective on personal growth through untimely emotions and unbalanced body changes
  • Poetry about aging, a mother’s abortion, and PTSD
  • A discussion of medium-term recovery from rape and abuse using the medium of journaling to come to terms with what happened
  • Lessons learned from poc family that white environmental and feminist activism failed to teach the writer
  • How to take care of oneself and attempt to avoid secondary trauma when working as a domestic violence advocate or in a similar position
  • Understanding the relationship between race and gender with Body Focused Repetitive Disorders through the eyes of one sufferer
  • The honest and raw process of understanding asexual erasure, one’s asexuality, sexuality, and other’s reactions to it all
  • Coming of age in new jersey, Mad Pride, organizing in southern appalachia, and struggles to maintain community among psychiatric survivors
  • A personal essay deconstructing the supposed linear trajectory of the concept of “healing,” while exploring the author’s ties to alternative mental health philosophies
  • An essay examining the social and personal meanings of self-harming behaviours through a feminist, trauma-informed lens
  • Exploring how the meaning of friendship has changed throughout the author’s life in late capitalism, alternately providing spaces of healing and challenges to identity as a sex-negative, working poor black woman in suburbia

This issue also includes feminists we love, current feminist heroes, and a vegan/gf recipe for 8 Layer Taco Dip! The zine is ½ size, black & white print, 80 pages, and very text heavy.

+ Note about Triggering Content: We are circulating the above descriptive list in an effort to reveal the content and ordering of this issue, thus creating the opportunity for readers to judge on a personal basis as to which essays could be potentially triggering or uncomfortable to them. We have chosen not to place trigger warnings on specific pieces in Hoax because we recognize that triggers are unique and highly personal. We believe that it is impossible to discern what content has the potential to be upsetting and/or triggering to every one of our readers, and we do not want to inadvertently create a hierarchy of what material is “intense” or “real” enough to warrant a warning. Please contact us if you have suggestions as to how to better incorporate trigger warnings into future issues of Hoax.

+ Note about Pricing and Stipends: This issue costs US$3.50. All of the money procured for Hoax goes right back into this not-for-profit project. As mentioned above, pre-sales are vital for ensuring that we are able to give adequate stipends to our contributors. What we are able to offer for compensation will depend on the amount of revenue from sales and pre-sales. Although we cannot afford to pay very much (probably just enough to purchase a few zines), we hope that offering a stipend, however small, will ensure that our contributors of the present and future know that their submissions are valued and appreciated.

You can pre-order via our Etsy shop (for PayPal payments, where you can also find back issues on change, mythologies, vulnerabilities, embodiments, and strategy as well as some Hoax pins and many of our personal zines) or, if you prefer well hidden US cash via snail mail, you can e-mail us at hoaxzine (at) gmail (dot) com to find out where to send it. If you are interested in potentially becoming a contributor to Hoax, please check out our call for submissions for Hoax #13: Feminisms & Spaces, which is accepting submissions until July 31st, 2016 (deadline is flexible)!

+ Note about Mailing: We will be mailing out issues on a first-come, first-serve basis as soon as possible, optimally starting on THURSDAY JULY 7TH – but our ability to purchase necessary printing / mailing supplies and send copies out depends on when we will sell enough zines to afford to get everything in the mail. As always, feel free to send us an email if you have any questions about the status of your order.

+ Note about Not Listing Contributors’ Names: We have included a screenshot of the Table of Contents above to safeguard our contributors from “being Googleable” while providing credit and transparency as to who collaborated on this issue. Content that is consented to appear in print is not automatically consented to appear online and respect for our contributors’ comfort, safety, and privacy is also one of many reasons why circulated issues of Hoax are only found in hard copy form.

+ Other Ways to Support this Project: We’d love for you to submit content to future issues of the zine, come to an assembly party (held in New York City periodically), write a review about Hoax, recommend it to your friends and favorite zine distros, and/or donate money to overall Hoax operations via PayPal (our account is hoaxzine at gmail dot com).

Please reblog to spread the word! Happy reading, y’all!

With care,

sari (Editor) & rachel (Editorial Assistant)

I was thinking about the OP of the whole “electric candles are not witchcraft” thing and how they suggested using a wax melter as if the “magic” is in the wax, which confused me because I thought the reason people used candles traditionally with the whole elemental thing and candles being the representation of fire? not wax. wax is not an element… or maybe it is in their tradition, who knows? I don’t even really work with elements in any way that I have seen discussed before so who am I to know?

I’m about to hit a ridiculous milestone in followers and I sort of want to do a give away but I’m not exactly sure what to give. I have an extra copy of DIY Magic, some Mercury Retrograde Protection oil, some candles I made, herbs and seeds from my yard and bunch of awesome witchy crap I found in free boxes but haven’t used yet. Is that something anyone would be interested in? I could throw in some witchy zines from my distro or something. If I did it, it would be a really short give away, like 24 hours, for current followers. Let’s see if I can find some time to put it together tomorrow. Wednesday is my Saturday and also Wicked Witch Wednesday!

• BROWN RECLUSE ZINE DISTRO •
• CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS •

“Zine culture is not white culture. D.I.Y. culture is not white culture. Punk is not inherently white culture. So in the spirit of resistance, in the spirit of visibility and in the spirit of celebrating our cultures and intersectionality: Brown Recluse Zine Distro.”

BRZD IS NOW LOOKING FOR NEW ZINES!
We have all different kinds of zines (personal zines, political zines, DIY how-to zines) abt all sorts of stuff: racism, gender, sexuality, punk, sex work, feminism, addiction, recovery, harm reduction, anarchism, racism, teaching, self care, antioppression wok, accountability, herbalism, food, traditions, mental health, community activism, traveling, touring, bands, accountability processes, parenting, &more!

we’re open to all sorts of stuff! our criteria is p loose but we have an especially HARD NO to anything that includes hateful content towards trans folks, sex workers, and/or substance users.

please share this CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS far & wide!!

looking forward to continuing to support black & brown zine writers ❤️

xoxo