zero nation

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Love is in the air. We can feel the romantic and vintage atmosphere.✨💕

** Figuarts Zero chouette Tuxedo / Mirage Memorial ornament **

Happy #NationalPizzaDay…In Space!

STS-094 - Pizza in Spacelab
File Unit: STS-94, 4/12/1981 - 7/21/2011Series: Mission Photographs Taken During the Space Shuttle Program , 4/12/1981 - 7/21/2011Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006 

Description: Views of a partially eaten pizza taken by the STS-94 crew while in the Spacelab module to document that the food was eatable.


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New Update!
OMG!! 😲😳FiguartsZero Salilor Saturn & S.H.Figuarts Super Sailor Mars🔥 Coming this September
**Japanese release date.

😍😘😘😗😙😙😚 Very Beautiful

The moonshine is a message of the beloved.🌙💕

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BVLhchMDXiZ/?taken-by=sailormoon.gallery

Figuarts Zero Sailor Uranus & Sailor Neptune Crystal Version

“ I’ve just got them this morning, so nervous because of bad review from others Sailor Moon fans that the real one are not the same as the promo. When I saw the Neptune face, I totally agree with the reviews that I’ve heard before because the face was so strange. I’m so disappointed of them, these is not worth for the limited edition. I hope that Bandai will improve it soon because this is not the first time and the figuarts as well.”

Happy 60th Birthday to Mae Jemison, the First African-American Woman in Space!

Mission Specialist (MS) Mae Jemison poses in Spacelab-Japan (SLJ).
File Unit: STS-47, 4/12/1981 - 7/21/2011Series: Mission Photographs Taken During the Space Shuttle Program , 4/12/1981 - 7/21/2011Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

Born on October 17, 1956, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African-American woman in space during @nasa‘s mission STS-47 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992. 

(via GIPHY)

vimeo

Original video caption:


Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona hosts some of the most unique landscapes on the planet, from the red iron oxide cliffs of its namesake, to the Jurassic-era petrified sandstone of White Pocket. This area features what some have described as “brain rocks” and “cauliflower rocks,” possibly formed through earthquakes after the landscape was lithified from sand into rock. White Pocket sees very few visitors, due to an hour-long drive by strenuous sand roads often impassable due to rain and snow.

As the second part of a BBC Earth timelapse trilogy, our shoot consisted of two days and two nights of intense conditions, including high winds, thunderstorms, fog heavy rain, and other obstacles. Despite the adversity, the tempest broke and some incredible stars shone through to put on a show. Shot on Canon DSLR Cameras. Star trails created using rotation of earth’s axis and STARSTAX. Wide motion control cliffs shot achieved with Dynamic Pecrception Stage Zero Dolly.

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Malian-French Singer Inna Modja Is on a Mission to Spread Hope

To see more from Inna, check out @innamodjaofficiel on Instagram. For more music stories, head to @music.

For Inna Modja (@innamodjaofficiel ), music and art are more than just a career or hobby — they’re her calling to bring a moment, however brief, of happiness and hope into the world. With that in mind, the 31-year-old singer and her friend Marco Conti Sikic, a photographer and director, started the street art project #wingsforfreedom, in which they paint angelic bird wings on walls and photograph people standing in front of them as if they’re ready to fly.

“The idea was, for a few minutes, let them dream,” Inna — pronounced “ee-nah” — says of the photos, which were taken throughout Africa, and in Paris right after the terrorist attacks in November. “In those areas of the world, hope is the most important thing. You need hope to have the strength to keep on going.” Soon, they’ll take the project on the road to Brazil, as well as Calais, France, where they’re teaching art and music to orphaned refugees from the Middle East.

Inna is so selfless about her charity work that when Instagram @music first calls her at her home in Paris, she asks if it’s OK to call back in five minutes, then profusely apologizes for the slight delay. The reason for the hold up? She had to work on a speech for the United Nations’ International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation. It’s a personal cause to Inna, having been a victim of the horrific practice as a child at the hands of an older family member. The event marked her second time at the UN, after she performed there last year with Juanes and Cody Simpson, and came the day before her first proper concert in the United States at New York’s Standard Hotel.

Musically, Inna’s style is the perfect fit for such a global event. Growing up in the northern Saharan part of Mali, she heard the country’s traditional music, as well as ‘60s soul, Metallica, Boyz II Men, Barbra Streisand and many more. “Blues music takes its root in Malian music. That’s why I love American music, because it has a lot alignment with our traditional music.” On her third album, 2015’s Motel Bamako, which was inspired by her trips around the world, she raps in the Malian language of Bambara over a blend of soul, electronic and R&B music.

“I define myself as a desert girl. We are nomads. For me, traveling is a lot in my culture.” Recently, she spent time in Mexico, seeing Mayan ruins and learning about the country’s relationship with mezcal and tequila in Zihuatanejo. As a photographer, she likes to capture the local flavors and architecture, as opposed to just the tourist sites. “It helps me see the world on a bigger scale, so what I’m talking about in my music gets richer because I get to meet another culture, another street.”

Tragically, being a northern desert girl is virtually impossible back in Mali. She still visits the country, but not in the area where she was raised. For the past several years, Islamic terrorists have held that part of the country and banned all forms of entertainment, from singing to soccer.

“Especially as a female musician, talking about the crisis in Mali and doing a song called ‘Tombouctou’ about what’s going on there, it’s really difficult. There are some parts in the country where I wouldn’t go because my life would be in danger. For them, I shouldn’t be doing music, I shouldn’t be not wearing a veil. But I’m a musician. I have to spread the message.“

––Dan Reilly for Instagram @music

Now it makes sense that a literal human country might not ever really be able to have a day off, but if Romano is not getting a lunch break every day I think he seriously needs to contact his union representative