youth-homelessness

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Famous Lesbians, Lesbian History:

Ruth Ellis (1899 - 2000) - activist

  • became widely known as the oldest surviving open lesbian, and LGBT rights activist at the age of 100
  • came out as a lesbian around 1915
  • met her partner of 30 years Ceciline “Babe” Franklin in the 1920s. They moved together to Detroit in 1937, where their house was known in the African American community as the “gay spot”. It was a central location for gay and lesbian parties, and also served as a refuge for African American gays and lesbians
  • The Ruth Ellis Center honors the life and work of Ruth Ellis, and is one of only four agencies in the United States dedicated to homeless LGBT youth and young adults.
15 Trans People who Have Made History

I feel it is extremely important to know about the people in our community who came before us. Throughout history trans people have made history by acting as activists, advocates, and just by being themselves in a world at that against them. This list is by no means complete but the point is to highlight some of the trans people who have made history for our community. 

1) Frances Thompson: Frances was most likely the first trans person to testify before a congressional committee in the US. In 1866 she was a victim of the Memphis Riot. The riot occurred when a group of white men went into a neighbourhood where former slaves, such as Frances, lived. They burned buildings and attacked the former slaves. It was on this matter that she testified before the committee. Ten years later she was arrested for “transvestism.”

2) Lucy Hicks Anderson: Lucy was born in 1886 and began living as a woman a young age. She was first married in 1929 and then attempted to get married again in 1944.However, in 1944 her marriage was denied and she was accused of perjury for saying that she was a woman. After then she became one of the first fighters for marriage equality in America.

3) Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson: Marsha is most known for being one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riot in 1969 however her involvement in the LGBT community stretches beyond that. She was the co-founder of S.T.A.R. which provided support and resources for homeless trans youth. She was also heavily involved in the Gay Liberation Front. She fought for LGBT rights and for people living with HIV and AIDS. She supported the community until her life was cut short in 1992 under suspicious circumstances.

4) Sylvia Rivera: Sylvia was also one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riots. At only seventeen years old she co-founded S.T.A.R. She was also a founder of the Gay Liberation Front. She spent a lot of time advocating for trans people, drag queens, and other people who were not included in the mainstream gay rights movement including fighting against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York. She was an advocate for the community until her death in 2002.

5) Miss Major Griffin-Gracy: Miss Major was another leader at the Stonewall Riots in 1969 and the community in New York at the time. In the late 1970s she moved to San Diego and started grassroots movements such as working with a food bank to serve trans women who were incarcerated, struggling with addiction, or were homeless. During the AIDS epidemic she provided people with healthcare and organized funerals often one or more a week.  In 1990 she moved to the San Francisco area where she worked with many HIV/AIDs organizations. In 2003 she began working at the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project where she works to help transgender women who have been imprisoned. She continues to work as an activist to this day.

6) Hiromasa Ando: Hiromasa was a professional speedboat racer in Japan and publically transitioned when he was given permission to start competing as a male in 2002 becoming the first openly trans person in the sport. He also is one of the first openly trans athletes in the world. 

7) Aya Kamikawa: In 2003 Aya made history when she became the first openly transgender person to be elected into office in Japan. She has also worked for the LGBT community both as a politician and before as a committee member for Trans-Net Japan.

8) Trudie Jackson: Trudie Jackson is a long-time activist for the LGBT and Native American Communities. She has worked with the ASU Rainbow Coalition, the Native American Student Organization, The National LGBTQ Task Force, and the Southwest American Indian Rainbow Gathering. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Equality Arizona Skip Schrader Spirit of Activism Award, one of the 2013 Trans 100, and Echo Magazine’s 2013 Woman of the Year. She is a huge advocate for the Native American trans community.

9) Kim Coco Iwamoto: When elected to the Hawaiian Board of Education in 2006 she held the highest office of any openly trans person in America. She served two terms on the Board of Education and is now a commissioner on the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission.

10) Diego Sanchez: Sanchez was the first openly trans person to hold a senior congressional staff position on Capitol Hill in America when he was appointed by Barney Frank in 2008.

11) Kylar Broadas: Broadas is an attorney, professor, and the first openly trans person to testify in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he spoke in support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in 2012. In 2010 he founded the Trans People of Color Coalition.

12) Isis King: She became the first openly trans person to be on America’s Next Top Model in 2008. Her openess and involvement in the show and involvement in the show attracted a lot of both negative and positive attention. She has continued to work as a model, role-model, and advocate for transgender people. 

13) Blake Brockington: Blake first made headlines when he became the first openly transgender high school homecoming king in North Carolina. He was also an activist for the LGBT community, transgender youth and fought against police brutality. Sadly, Brockington lost his life at the age of 18 in 2015 after committing suicide.

14) Diane Marie Rodriguez Zambrano: She has been a human rights and LGBT rights activist in Ecuador for many years. In 2009 she sued the Civil Registry to change her name and set precedent for other trans people to be able to change their names. In 2013 she became the first openly trans person, or LGBT person, in Ecuador to run for office.

15) Ruby Corado: She is an activist born in El Salvador but living in America. She was involved in the Coalition to Clarify the D.C. Human Rights Act which was changed the act to include gender identity and expression. In 2012 she opened Casa Ruby which is the only bilingual and multicultural LGBT organization in Washington, D.C. She has been working for human rights for over 20 years.

I want to tell a quick story about how important representation in television is, and how Sense8 is really making a tangible difference. You can repost if you like, I thought your followers might enjoy it.

My dad is a wealthy, white, conservative male who voted for Trump. He’s not a hateful person…in fact he’s one of the kindest people you’ll meet and he can talk to a random stranger for hours. But he’s extremely fiscally conservative and tends to have a narrow world view. 

He and I argue a lot. He calls me a naive liberal who has no idea how the real world works. I call him a decrepit old man who wouldn’t know innovation if it kicked him in the teeth. It’s our way of keeping each other on our toes. 

But we love to watch TV together. Game of Thrones, House of Cards, and Vikings are a few of our favorites. I always held off on showing him Sense8…I honestly didn’t think he’d like it. But one day he asked me “What should we watch next?” and I though…why not?

He absolutely loved it. Yeah he thought the sex scenes were a little gratuitous, but he couldn’t stop watching. He even started talking about it to all his brothers and friends during our BBQ. I was so pumped he enjoyed it. 

But it was one scene in particular that really changed things for him: Nomi’s speech during her sister’s rehearsal dinner in episode 2x8. 

You see, my dad thought Nomi’s relationship with her Mom was unrealistic. He said “Parents love their kids unconditionally. No real mother would ever say those types of things. I mean…she’s not abusive. She’s not a drug addict or an alcoholic. And clearly no money problems at home. A real mom wouldn’t hate their kids just because.”

I was floored and didn’t know what to say at first. He had called me sheltered and naive so many times…and then he says something like that. I realize that it’s because he loves me so much (and would still love me so much even if I were trans) that he found a character like Nomi’s mom not just unrelatable, but completely unrealistic. 

But eventually I say this. 

“Dad…about half of homeless youth are LGBT. Believe it or not, this is one of the most realistic parts of the show.”

To which he replies: “Oh. Really? I…didn’t know that.”

And then a few minutes later Nomi’s says her speech and I look over and my dad is tearing up, just a little. 

“You doing alright over there?”

“Yeah…yeah I just….I’m fine. But I think I get it a little more now.”

So that’s my story. Even old white guy who voted for Trump is heartbroken about Sense8’s cancellation. That says a lot about how big a mistake Netflix is making. 


Submitted by @fourforyouglencoco

The new Young American Tracking Poll (YATP) is a first-of-its-kind quarterly survey and report that focuses on the opinions and behaviors of Americans between the ages 13 and 25 on topics in politics, policy, and civic engagement.

From its annual surveying of young Americans conducted since 2013, DoSomething.org and TMI Strategy launched the YATP in order to elevate the voices of young people in discussions of national policies and priorities. The poll brings attention to the distinct ways young millennials and Gen Z participate in their civic communities, which often contrast from beliefs and actions found in the general adult population in America.

Most often, young people are defined as 18–29 and so thinly sampled that additional segmentation within the group is impossible. And for the voices of those under 18? Nothing.

Specifically, the YATP provides an alternative to the standard approaches taken by traditional polling towards young people. Most often, young people are defined as 18–29 and so thinly sampled that additional segmentation within the group is impossible. This approach mutes the nuances of youth experience and opinions. The circumstances of someone in her late teens are very different than someone in her late twenties. And even with more narrow age-bracketing, there are major differences between urban and rural youth, male and female, and so on.

And for the voices of those under 18? Nothing. Most national polls omit 13- to 18-year-olds entirely from sampling, thereby silencing millions of young people who disproportionately rely on and are impacted by policy decisions.

Summary of Key Findings

The YATP finds that young Americans overwhelmingly disapprove of Donald Trump and his policies. For all areas where a direct comparison is possible, youth disapproval of Trump exceeds that of the general population. Specifically, American youth disproportionately disagree with Trump’s actions regarding immigration and border security.

In the months since the election, young people significantly increased their participation in organized protests, their use of technology to take and promote positions on social issues, and their use of social networks to organize others to take action.

This strong disapproval of Trump corresponds with a perceptible increase in civic participation from young Americans. In the months since the election, young people significantly increased their participation in organized protests, their use of technology to take and promote positions on social issues, and their use of social networks to organize others to take action.

Self-identified young “liberals” — one third of all young people — are driving the increase in civic participation almost entirely. This group has been two to three times more likely to take action than self-identified “moderate” or “conservative” peers since the November election.

Additionally, across a broad set of issues and policy areas, America’s young people are increasingly taking sides. On nearly every issue/policy asked about in the YATP, the percent of young people with no opinion decreased following the election.

The biggest gains in agreement went almost exclusively towards traditionally liberal positions. On topics ranging from climate change, to immigration reform, to the legalization of marijuana, a new consensus is forming among young Americans.

On topics ranging from climate change, to immigration reform, to the legalization of marijuana, a new consensus is forming among young Americans.

On several issues and policy areas, young liberals diverge from young moderates and young conservatives. The Women’s March in Washington, D.C. and identification with feminism are resoundingly unpopular with young moderates and young conservatives but are popular with young liberals. On issues of religion and security, young moderates and young conservatives are noticeably more skeptical of refugees and concerned by terrorism than are their young liberal peers.

In this report, we’ll take a deep dive into:

Keep reading

Shady/Illegal Tips P.2

Dayummm I had no ides the first one would be so popular!

* Hairspray can beat a counterfeit marker on fake bills

* Buy a movie ticket, but plan out the theater’s schedule so you can see multiple movies throughout the day, back-to-back.

* For extra carry-ons at no charge, go the airport gift shop and ask for a gift bag, and stuff your stuff into it. Because it looks like you purchased it at the airport, the flight will let you bring it on free, even if it’s over your carry-on limit.

* The most popular brand of washing machine is a ‘Speed Queen’ if your apartment complex uses Speed Queen you are in luck. Go on eBay and buy a Speed Queen 800 key. Its a hex key, looks like a circle with a little knob on one part. The keys go for about 15 bucks on eBay. When you have the keys starting the machine for free is easy! 

* If there is something electronic at work you’d like to have and you have time to do it…. open it up, disable it (clip a power wire or unplug a wire on the circuit board), then close it up. When someone tries to operate it it wont work. They will think it is worn out or malfunctioned or broken and throw it away. Go into the garbage later to retrieve it. Open it up, undo your previous disabling and now you have it. Working and everything

* For the desperately broke/homeless youth. I used to do this when i was a skate rat. All you needed was a hammer, a quarter, and an older vending machine. Hammer the quarter flatter and flatter till its the size of a silver dollar ($1 coin whatever). Old vending machines obviously don’t have the greatest technology in them and can only read the now flatted coin’s size as a silver dollar. Then hit the coin return. Your quarter just became 4 quarters.

* If you live in a house in an area that still has basic cable, you can give yourself free cable by going outside and opening the gray plastic cable box on the outside of your house, inside you’ll see cable wire spliced together with what looks like a large, stainless steel AA battery. Just unscrew that and screw the two ends of cable into each other. That AA battery thing is called a “filter.” Without it on, you now have cable. Its seriously that easy.

* Any time I need to park at a concert , which often around here they charge $20-30 for parking, I roll the window down and say “hello, I’m a journalist working the show tonight for [make up publication or webzine] and was told by venue management to ask for staff parking”. If there’s a staff parking lot, you get staff parking. If there isn’t, they’re confused and just let you park in the regular lot for free.

* If you want to slack off at work, slack off but act annoyed/frustrated around your boss which will give the impression you’re working hard

* My dad (a graphic artist) made a perfect mock-up of the parking sticker for the train station and parked there for free for a good twenty years.

*

A good friend of mine was diagnosed with liver cancer when we were in high school. She was 16. Some time later, upon hearing that a surgery had not gone as well as hoped, I sat down with my guitar and wrote her a song. A few other good friends of hers strung together some photographs to make a music video and we sent it to her to watch from her hospital bed. When those same friends gathered together less than two years later to sing the song at her funeral, the dissonance was jarring. This was meant to be a work song, to see her through the hard days when the task of healing was tiring. It was not supposed to be a funeral hymn.

In June of 2015, we as a band decided that our LGBTQ community deserved a new song for Pride Week. This was days after the Supreme Court ruled that state-level bans on same-sex marriages were in violation of the Constitution of the United States, and it felt like the whole country was celebrating.

But as we began to write, I couldn’t help but think that although we had won this particular battle, the hatred and fear ailing our nation seemed as malignant as ever.

I knew this because people were still dying.

At least 21 transgender women were murdered in 2015. A disproportionate percent of our country’s homeless youth were (and are) LGBTQ adolescents, forced to reckon with the impossible task of staying healthy and safe without a home or proper health care.

We knew that if we were to make a song that truly spoke to the American LGBTQ community in 2015, it would need to address both victory and violence.

With “I Know a Place,” we chose to imagine a place where none of us would need to be afraid. In honor of Pride and the rich LGBTQ history of turning bars and ballrooms into safe havens, the space we imagined was a dance club:

I can tell when you get nervous
You think being yourself means being unworthy
And it’s hard to love with a heart that’s hurting
But if you want to go out dancing
I know a place
I know a place we can go
Where everyone’s gonna lay down their weapons

At the time, we intended the dance club to serve as a metaphor. Then, on June 12th, 2016, a gunman walked into Latin Night at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida — a queer space, a brown space, a safe space — and shot 49 people to death.

“I Know a Place” was never supposed to be a funeral hymn. It was meant to be a work song, like Yoko Ono’s full-page ad in the New York Times that proclaimed, “War Is Over!” in December of 1969, at the height of the Vietnam War. We wrote our song to be the voice in your head that tells you to celebrate peace during wartime, because our battle is only just beginning, and one day our war really will be over.

It was also meant to serve as encouragement for our community to remain vulnerable and kind and hopeful in the face of violence. We cannot build a better world without first imagining what that world might look like, and by creating that space inside ourselves first.

After the Pulse shooting, the Los Angeles Gay Men’s Chorus led a crowd of two thousand people outside City Hall in song:

We are a gentle, angry people
And we are singing
Singing for our lives

We sang with a unified voice that cried out, “We do not accept that this is what our world will look like.” And that night, people all over the country went out dancing — not just because it was Pride Weekend, but because they felt it important not to give in to fear in the face of hate.

People came together in dive bars, bedrooms, and places of worship to celebrate and to grieve, to love and protect one another, and this gentle resilience was nothing less than radical resistance.

Today, in this post-Trump America, many of us feel badly bruised. We, as a band, understand this. We believe it is a mistake to see this incoming Administration as anything other than a threat to the livelihood of our brothers and sisters; the LGBTQ+ community, the Muslim ummah, women, POC’s, indigenous Americans, undocumented people, the working class, and beyond. At the same time, we believe it is a mistake to say that a man whose best assets are hate and fear truly represents America. We say this because America has always been an idea, a utopian concept of a multiethnic, multicultural democratic republic, and therefore its home lies in the imagination, not in the House or the Senate or in a Trump Tower. In the bridge of the song, we implore:

They will try to make you unhappy; don’t let them
They will try to tell you you’re not free; don’t listen
I know a place where you don’t need protection
Even if it’s only in my imagination

Let us push ourselves to imagine a peaceful America where no one has to live in fear. Let us continue to build spaces with our humble means that reflect the America of which we dream. Let us keep up the fight.

Let us keep singing for our lives.

ー Katie Gavin, MUNA

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‘2016 was our deadliest year on record, with 27 transgender people killed in the US alone, the vast majority of victims being trans women of colour. 8 transgender people have been murdered in hate crimes this year, all trans women of colour. Those are only the stats that have been reported, and it’s barely April. Last year at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, we were the targets of the deadliest mass shooting in American history. 

40% of homeless youth in this country identify as LGBTQ+. We have an administration in power eager to strip us of our most fundamental rights. Clearly, we have a very long way to go. But…we must persist

please make my birthday not full of crying

hi hi! my name’s Jessica and I’m a black trans girl who works primarily with homeless queer youth. my birthday’s coming up next week and I’ve had pretty awful experiences w/birthdays since I stopped talking to my (emotionally/physically/sexually) abusive bio family. I made an Amazon wishlist for some stuff i want/need - if you have the means, please buy me a thing or signal boost this post!

http://a.co/1QVHQ9m 

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How fashion icon Nick Wooster is using his robust closet to give back to LGTBQ youth

  • Most people putting half their closet up for sale may not expect huge returns. Then again, Nick Wooster isn’t just anybody — and neither is his closet.
  • In fact, half of his closet is enough to fill-out the pop-up shop he created — with the support of the Hetrick-Martin Institute — in an effort to raise funds for disenfranchised LGBTQ youth. Read more. (3/31/17, 12:01 PM)
Gods in the city

The gods are everywhere.

Thor the Thunderer rumbles the underground on the rails of subways and trains. He’s in the thunderstorms that pierce the smog with their lightning and shake buildings with their thunder.

Odin stands over the shoulders of busy students that cram for their exams, marveling at their thirst for knowledge. He walks with us through museums, seeing the art of the worlds and immersing Himself in the history.

Freyja can walk the main streets or stomp across a stage wearing heels and little else, and still cut an imposing figure. Men and woman alike can both fear and admire Her for her attractiveness and tenacity.

Skadi howls with the winds that whip between skyscrapers and down alleys in the winter. She bites at exposed fingers of students walking to and from classes. She scavenges with homeless youth for food during storms.

And Loki, of course, can live on the streets among the lost and the forgotten. The ostracised misfits that have no home anywhere but where they make it. Loki, who reminds you that there is always a way, brings ideas to down and outters, teaching them how to survive.

Our gods can be modern, too.

one thing i’ve learned from being involved in radical grassroots organizing is that radical organizers really don’t tend to be out there talking about how voting is stupid and useless. are they liberals who think we can fix everything through voting alone? of course not. but they are intimately familiar with the fact that elections have consequences. they know, for example, that the election of trump means the previously achievable goal of ending aids worldwide is now on indefinite hold. they know a republican congress could mean millions lose access to care. and they know more conservatives in local government means fewer beds for homeless lgbt youth. so yeah, you should vote. it’s all right to vote your conscience and by no means should it be the only thing you do. but it matters.

I am so gay because 40% of all homeless youth are LGBTQ
I am so gay because one in 12 trans people will be murdered
I am so gay because the same systems say gay people are less than and need to obliged by our standards of what is normal are the same system that justify police brutality, discrimination, voter discrimination laws.
But most importantly i am so gay because loving resources that provides me with so much strength like my parents that it would be selfish and wrong not to share that with the people that do not have them yet.
-Thomas Lloyd, Why Am I So Gay

Thank you, Marsha P Johnson, for throwing the shot glass heard around the world. Thank you for standing with your sisters in the Stonewall uprising. Thank you for telling a reporter at an early Gay Pride, ‘darling, I want my gay rights now’. Thank you for standing up to TERFs who didn’t want drag queens to march. Thank you for founding Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with Sylvia Rivera to support queer homeless youth. Thank you for being a Hot Peach and proving that performance is activism. Thank you for never compromising in being you, for standing up to those who attacked you verbally and physically including being stabbed and shot. Thank you for showing us that our heroes can look like us and be like us, we can see ourselves in you as a genderqueer POC whose mental ill health journey is as vital a part of your narrative as your activism. Thank you Marsha for being part of our essential history and herstory.

Yesterday was the anniversary of Marsha’s death. She had marched in the parade and was later found dead in the Hudson. Although originally assumed a suicide because of her mental health, her death was the result of a hate crime. She had been harassed by a gang and one of them later bragged about killing her.

Marsha you are my hero. When I think of our liberation and LGBTQ+ pride I always think first about you.

Love.

CHICAGO <3

Hey guys,

Today’s show is in Chicago, Illinois which is home to both the first openly-LGBTQ advocacy group in the United States and to Boystown, the first officially recognized gay village in the U.S. Boystown is now known for its nightlife and colorful atmosphere.

In Chicago we’ll be working with Project Fierce, an incredible organization that aims to reduce LGBTQ youth homelessness in Chicago by providing accessible housing and support services.
At a time when LGBTQ youth are at greater risk for depression, bullying, and violence, than their peers, organizations like Project Fierce are a necessary resource for teens that don’t feel safe. About 40% of homeless American teens identify as LGBTQ and Project Fierce can provide them with a safe and comfortable environment.

Want a ticket upgrade? We’re taking donations of basic necessities that are often taken for granted. We are asking that you bring a new stick of deodorant to donate at the show. Bring at least one to be entered in a raffle for a ticket upgrade.

Love Troye x

vanityfair.com
Rudy’s Barbershop Provides Products and Showers for L.G.B.T.Q. and Homeless Youth
As the first in a series of features on beauty brands that give back, we take a look at the Seattle-born barbershop, Rudy’s.
By Nora Maloney

We’ve been partnered with Rudy’s for a long time and couldn’t be more pleased by the launch of their newest hair products (the 1-2-3 Showering System), in which they pledge – for every product sold in the first 90 days, they will donate a week’s worth of the same product to a shelter that serves LGBT youth.

Says CEO Brendon Lynch, “In our work with various LGBTQ organizations, we were made aware that with our products and services we could make an impact for an extremely at-risk segment of this population, homeless youth,” says Lynch. “It Gets Better Projects charity organization was a natural partner given their scale and our previous partnerships with them.”

Homelessness affects LGBT youth disproportionately, with almost 40% of all homeless youth identifying as LGBT – and access to personal care can have a big impact on one’s ability to get back on their feet.