yourshot

Top Shot: The Great Divide

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen. The Daily Dozen is 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors each day from thousands of recent uploads. Our community has the chance to vote for their favorite from the selection.

Central Park West, in New York City, as seen from above where there is a split between the architecture of the city and the green of Central Park. Photograph by Kathleen Dolmatch

“A large, inquisitive, and almost dangerously playful female humpback whale calf measures me with her pectoral fin,” explains Matthew Draper, who took this photo in Tonga. “This image was captured on a very wide fish-eye lens, which doesn’t quite show how close she really is. By measuring how close I am she can determine if her tail is going to come in contact with me as she swims past.”

Photograph by Matthew Draper, National Geographic Your Shot

Every moment has its special place because of the uniqueness it carries with it. And it’s these small, special moments that string together to form this precious thing we call life. Someone has well said that sooner or later we must realize there is no station, no one place to arrive at once and for all. The true joy of life is the trip.
I captured this picture at Flinder’s Metro Station, Melbourne, Australia.
This photograph got published on the National Geographic Daily Dozen  http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/897351/
Photo By: Siddharth Setia
www.facebook.com/SiddharthSetiaPhotography

Caption This: Elephant Herd

Last week we asked you to caption this photo of elephants at the elephant orphanage in Pinnawala, Sri Lanka by Your Shot member Yasha Shantha for our series on the National Geographic Facebook page.

And the editorial team’s favorite caption is…

“Pardon me…pardon me…excuse me..oops sorry..didn’t mean to step on your trunk..excuse me..pardon me…”Connie Glover

Thanks for captioning this! Try your hand at writing captions this week on National Geographic’s Facebook page. New “Caption This” photos are posted on Monday, and the captioning closes Friday at noon.

This image is published in the “Getting Your Shot” book. Go on 17 different assignments with National Geographic, and learn from their photographers, editors, and photo community. Right now get 40% off the book when you pre-order!

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The aurora borealis sets the Iceland sky alight with an otherworldly glow. This phenomenon is triggered when the sun sends charged particles coursing to Earth. The best time to see the light show in Iceland is on a clear night in winter—visibility improves the colder it gets.

Photograph by Daniele Boffelli, National Geographic Your Shot

Hare Krishna

 A woman daubed in colors expresses her joy with open arms after seeing the sight of Lord Krishna during Holi celebrations at a temple at Vrindavan in Uttar Pradesh.

Photo by Siddharth Setia
Location: Vrindavan, India

To buy this Photo print mail me at siddharth4586@gmail.com

Join @siddharth-setia-photography to see more from my Travel stories.

Top Shot: Eye of the Leopard

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen. The Daily Dozen is 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors each day from thousands of recent uploads. Our community has the chance to vote for their favorite from the selection.

A leopard with a unique eye lifts her head after a hunt in Botswana. Photograph by Wayne Wetherbee.

8

Night Hiking Saddle Mountain. | Wanderlily

Saddle Mountain is one of my favorite hikes because it’s only a 2.5 mile climb that brings me closer to the sky. My Trail Buddy and I planned a trip to the coast this weekend to spend the night at Seaside but before bedtime we wanted to watch the stars. We spent the day on the beach enjoying the warm spring sun and cool winds but as evening approached we packed up our gear and drove to Saddle Mountain. This climb is only 2.5 miles but to the occasional hiker, I suggest planning a full day to get to the top, this hike is a steep incline and can be quite tiresome. Avid hikers can make this hike in two hours without stopping for breaks. 

The golden hour was upon us and the world was changing from gold to red, I loved the way the sunset lit up the trees and colored the world. My Trail Buddy and I reached the top before the sun set and were able to watch the light dissipate. Spring is my favorite time of the year for landscape photography because everything is so clear and crisp. We could see the ocean and the few cities along the NW Coast line of Oregon and Washington along with Mt. Saint Helens and the peaks of Mount Hood and Adams to the East. We hiked during the evening but if you planned a day hike, you’d be able to see the curvature of the world and a lot of NW Oregon.

We enjoyed the view of the stars then climbed back down in the dark, which only took us half the time, and went back to Seaside. After a dinner good enough for a hiker, we went back to the beach and laid under the stars until we were ready to retire.

If you would like to see more on Saddle Mountain, Please click here.

Top Shot: Root of the Frozen Matter

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen. The Daily Dozen is 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors each day from thousands of recent uploads. Our community has the chance to vote for their favorite from the selection.

Tree roots found on the frozen riverbanks of an Alaskan river. Photograph by Samantha Primera

“I found that the real life of NYC can best be captured by pointing the lens straight down from high above. From above, you feel the energy and flow of the city—he constant stream of yellow taxis lining the avenues, the waves of pedestrians hurriedly crossing at the change of traffic signals, little figures disappearing into the subway stations, the chorus of honking horns and sirens. The feeling of a city from above completely changes from daytime through twilight and into darkness.


Photograph by Navid Baraty, National Geographic Your Shot