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Cosmic Witchcraft 101 🌠

One of the questions I find myself answering a lot is “how do I get into cosmic witchcraft?” Although @phaesphore​ has a really good guide (here), I thought I’d write out a few of my own suggestions. 

Who:

  • Who can be a cosmic witch?
    • Anyone can be a cosmic witch! The main aspects of cosmic witchcraft include working with the various celestial bodies included in the cosmos, and harnessing energy from them depending upon your intent. If you feel drawn to the cosmos and the vastness of outer space, then cosmic witchcraft is definitely for you. 

What & Why:

  • Figure out what aspects of cosmic witchcraft that you are drawn to
    • Is it your fascination with outer space? Is it the desire for a spiritual relationship with the cosmos? There are many reasons someone might be drawn to this practice, so do some digging and figure out yours. 
  • Which celestial bodies do you want to work with and why? 
    • This ranges from planets, to stars, to constellations, and various deep space objects. Each celestial body has its own set of correspondences and associations, some that may resonate more with you than others. 
    • Still at a loss? Complete your birth chart and figure out your dominant planet - birth charts show the alignment of the planets at the time of your birth. Each person has a dominant planet, which can be found in more detailed birth charts that you can complete online. 
    • To find your dominant planet, go to Astro.com > click “extended chart selection” on the right hand side > fill out the necessary information > choose “Pullen/Astrolog” > from the dropdown menu, select “simple chart delineation by Walter Pullen” > scroll about ½ or ¾ of the way down the page until you find a section that lists the percentages of the planets in your chart > the planet with the highest percentage would be considered your dominant planet.
  • What kind of spells do you like to perform? 
  • What kind of tools do you like to use? 

When:

Where:

  • Cosmic witchcraft can be performed literally anywhere, whether it’s inside or outside. You don’t necessarily have to be outside under the night sky to successfully perform a cosmic spell or harness cosmic energy. If you choose to perform cosmic magick indoors, use some visual or auditory tools to help you out; i.e. spacey music, a picture of space on your computer, a space poster on the wall behind your altar, etc.

How:

Putting yourself first and making sure your happiness is taken care of is so important to your happiness and to your health.

How to tell fake news from real news

In November 2016, Stanford University researchers made an alarming discovery: across the US, many students can’t tell the difference between a reported news article, a persuasive opinion piece, and a corporate ad. This lack of media literacy makes young people vulnerable to getting duped by “fake news” — which can have real consequences.


Animation by Augenblick Studios


Want to strengthen your own ability to tell real news from fake news? Start by asking these five questions of any news item.


Animation by Patrick Smith

Who wrote it? Real news contains the real byline of a real journalist dedicated to the truth. Fake news (including “sponsored content” and traditional corporate ads) does not. Once you find the byline, look at the writer’s bio. This can help you identify whether the item you’re reading is a reported news article (written by a journalist with the intent to inform), a persuasive opinion piece (written by an industry expert with a point of view), or something else entirely.

Animation by Patrick Smith

What claims does it make? Real news — like these Pulitzer Prize winning articles — will include multiple primary sources when discussing a controversial claim. Fake news may include fake sources, false urls, and/or “alternative facts” that can be disproven through further research. When in doubt, dig deeper. Facts can be verified.

Animation by Martina Meštrović

When was it published? Look at the publication date. If it’s breaking news, be extra careful. Use this tipsheet to decode breaking news.

Animation by Augenblick Studios

Where was it published? Real news is published by trustworthy media outlets with a strong fact-checking record, such as the BBC, NPR, ProPublica, Mother Jones, and Wired. (To learn more about any media outlet, look at their About page and examine their published body of work.) If you get your news primarily via social media, try to verify that the information is accurate before you share it. (On Twitter, for example, you might look for the blue “verified” checkmark next to a media outlet name to double-check a publication source before sharing a link.)

Animation by Augenblick Studios

How does it make you feel? Fake news, like all propaganda, is designed to make you feel strong emotions. So if you read a news item that makes you feel super angry, pause and take a deep breath. Then, double-check the item’s claims by comparing it to the news on any three of the media outlets listed above — and decide for yourself if the item is real news or fake news. Bottom line: Don’t believe everything you read. There is no substitute for critical thinking.

Animation by TED-Ed

If you get in the habit of asking all 5 of these questions whenever you read a news article, then your basic news literacy skills will start to grow stronger. However, these are just the basics! To dive deeper into news and media literacy, watch the TED-Ed Lesson: How to choose your news. To find out more about what students need, read the Stanford University report, published here.

Animation by Augenblick Studios

Laura McClure is an award-winning journalist and the TED-Ed Editor. To learn something new every week, sign up here for the TED-Ed Newsletter.

The biggest lesson i’ve learned is, it’s okay. It’s okay to be kind to yourself. It’s okay to be wrong. It’s okay to get mad. It’s okay to be flawed. It’s okay to be happy. It’s okay to move on.

Hey everyone! Over the years I’ve had my fair share of English and other writing intensive classes, and combined with my tendency to procrastinate I’ve had to come up with a way to write papers fast. 

step one: finding a topic and research (aka the hardest part)

You can’t write a paper without a good topic, a strong thesis, and solid research. There’s no getting around that, no matter how short you are on time. Depending on the class and the teacher, you may have your topic chosen for you or you may have total freedom. If your situation is the latter, an ideal topic is one the you care about, have some general knowledge of already, and is specific enough to be covered in the number of pages you’re limited to. After you have a topic picked, do some quick searches to see what’s out there. If your school’s library has a database, that’s the perfect place to start. Be sure to chose quality articles that have been peer reviewed when possible, and where it’s not acknowledge that the source may be an biased in your paper. 

Once you’ve started research, you should have a pretty good idea of what your angle is going to be and what points you want to make. Next write a working thesis. This is basically a sentence or two that states what you will spend the next few pages proving. Once you have it, write it on an index card and put it aside for the next step.

step two: outlining 

Take a look at your past papers. How many paragraphs are usually on a page? It’s about two for me, so I keep that in mind when planning my outline. Now for the part that lets me write so fast: index cards. 

Take one index card per paragraph you’ll need to fill your page limit, and write “into” on the back of the one with your thesis, and conclusion on the other. Now think about how to best prove your thesis, and anything else you saw in research that you want to address. 

  • On one side of the card goes the general topic of the paragraph (ie, “significance of symbolism”).
  • On the back goes all of the specific notes and details that will go in that paragraph (ie, “spring as a symbol of a fresh start for x character”)
  • Once you’ve done that for every paragraph lay them out in front of you and experiment with order. How do they flow naturally?

step three: writing

Now that you have your outline, all you have to do is expand on what’s on your cards. Paragraphs should be at least five sentences each, which is super easy to achieve since you already know what you’re going to say! Think of each paragraph as a mini paper: sentence one should be a topic sentence/intro, explaining what you’re going to cover. The middle/body defends and expands on your topic sentence, and the last sentence or two should conclude the paragraph and transition to the next. 

Once you have your body, you can work on your intro and conclusion. A general rule of thumb for intros is to start with a hook (something interesting that draws the reader in) and ends with your thesis. In the middle should be a sentence or so for each paragraph/point, just to give a little map of where you’re going. The conclusion is basically the same, except in reverse. Wrap it up and tell them what you just told them. 

After that, let it sit for a little while (ideally a day, but if you’re short on time just go to dinner) and then come back to edit with fresh eyes. Reading out loud will help you catch typos!

step four: citations and formatting

I like to cite as I go so I don’t have to do it all at once. I typically write my own, but if I’m in a pinch I’ll use a citation generator (like son of citation) that works super fast. Just be sure to cite everything that needs one! Plagiarism is so not cool. Double check MLA/APA/Chicago guidelines and make sure that everything is formatted right, and you’re good to hit submit!

Good luck on those papers, my fellow procrastinators!

In all aspects of life, the body and mind are constantly adapting. Our muscles become stronger with continuous contractions. Our minds become more resilient against reoccurring stressors. Our immune system learns to react faster to incoming bacteria. Humans are astounding, really. We are so completely flexible towards improvement, not only physically, but mentally as well.

It’s okay to put yourself first :))

Writing is Hard, part 6: SEX

Summary: Dean and the reader have sex. Finally. FINALLY.

Read Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5

Warning: Smut

Word Count: 4250ish

A/N: This is all written with love for fan fic. I’m teasing, not putting it down in any way. And the quotes are from my own Faking It series, in case anyone was curious. Hope you enjoy! (Sorry, tag list is closed!) XOXO


“You knew he didn’t quite understand why you found it so hot, but Dean had never seen himself leaning over the engine in a tight, sweaty t-shirt, hands and forearms covered in grease as he worked.”

Dean’s outside working on the Impala, and you’re reading fics about just that. Apparently, Dean working on the Impala is the hottest thing to ever grace the fandom (aside from his lips…and his green eyes…and his cocky swagger that is really just hiding adorable and unnecessary insecurity…and Jesus, these people are thorough), and you’re curious. In your actual experience with Dean, working on the Impala is just a nuisance. You have to wait longer to get on the road, Dean takes forever to scrub himself clean afterward, and for the next few hours, everything smells like metal and oil covered up by motel soap. Why do people find that so hot?

Keep reading

Whisper

Summary: Nat does everything in her power to finally get you and Bucky together. 

Warnings: This is pretty much all smut: unprotected sex (please use protection), thigh riding, oral (m receiving), praise kink (kinda?). i think that’s it, let me know if you find anything else

Words: 3.4k

A/N: I finally wrote something! I have a few more pieces in the works now too. Sorry I haven’t been writing as much, but I am trying to work on that. Hope you enjoy. Send me requests here. 

Masterlist 

Originally posted by musicfixyou

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having an illness is so weird because even little things make you question how your body/mind works.

does everyone yawn like that?

does everyone get nervous over that?

is this normal? or just normal for me? is this normal for everyone or just everyone w my illness? or not normal at all and i should call a doctor?

wait no one does that? so it is me????

wait thats something healthy people do too??? so it isnt just me????

its like a constant state of paranoia and confusion and no answer is statisfying so you just sit there and ?????

It’s Okay To Say...
  • NO, if you don’t want to do it.
  • NO, if you don’t like the people.
  • NO, if you’d rather relax.
  • NO, if you’re already over scheduled.
  • NO, if you don’t have the time.
  • NO, if it doesn’t fit your values.
  • NO, if you feel forced to say “yes”.
  • NO, if it makes you feel uncomfortable.
  • NO, if it doesn’t make you happy.
Every second that we live, we have the choice of how we’re going to spend it. So choose wisely. Make good decisions. Time truly is priceless.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin
FITSPO IS THINSPO IN A SPORTS BRA.

Stop showing me frail women in Nike and calling it “inspiration”. 

Don’t work out to be thin. 
Work out to be stronger than you were before you worked out.

Don’t work out to “show them how how you can be”
Work out to show yourself the amazing things your body can do. 

Don’t work out to justify eating pizza. 
Work out to nourish your mind and eat pizza to nourish your soul. 

There are enough inaccurate representations of the female (and male, might I add) body plastered through magazines and on social media; we don’t need it here on our #fitblr at well, fam.