young pioneers

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Marrying the quality of letterpress with advances in typographical advances

Writer and editor, Louis Rossetto has teamed up with graphic and type designer Erik Spiekermann to produce ‘the World’s best book’. 

Change Is Good, has been written by Louis, co-founder of Wired, and documents the Digital Revolution and celebrates ‘the optimism and courage of the young pioneers who changed the world forever’. This story of the Heroic Era of the Internet has been combined with the next logical step in book printing.

Erik has spent two years working with a handful of engineering nerds in Hannover to perfect a technique named Post Digital Printing. This process enables the flexibility afforded by digital typography to be printed with the quality and richness you’d expect from typeset letterpress.  

The technique enables designers to go direct from screen to plate without intermediaries by employing a direct-to-plate laser cutter specifically for printing larger size sheets on letterpress.

You can see more about the book and back the project here on Kickstarter.

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From the NYT obituary. February 2008:

A slight, pale dancer with large eyes, Ms. Bessmertnova was known for an innate lyricism that gave her dancing a mysterious, almost unearthly beauty. These qualities made her especially notable in the title role of “Giselle.”

Reviewing the Bolshoi’s London season in 1969 for The New York Times, Clive Barnes called Ms. Bessmertnova “the kind of dancer born to dance Giselle.”

“She is as fragile as a bird, has a frail, waif-like innocence, and dances with a fey sense of doom,” he continued.

Ms. Bessmertnova frequently appeared with the Bolshoi in its New York seasons. When she starred at the New York State Theater in “Swan Lake” in 1979 in the dual role of Odette, the innocent maiden transformed into a swan, and Odile, the villainous enchantress, Anna Kisselgoff wrote in The Times that Ms. Bessmertnova “had only to step on stage to establish her great sense of style and authority.” She continued, “Regality was everywhere — from her first high leap to the velvety tone of her unfolding leg extensions.”

Ms. Bessmertnova, whose mother was a homemaker and whose father was a doctor, was born in Moscow and received early dance training in the children’s classes of the Moscow Young Pioneers Palace. Encouraged by her teachers to become a professional dancer, she continued her studies at the Bolshoi’s school and entered the company in 1961, making her debut in “Chopiniana,” a ballet known in the West as “Les Sylphides,” and one in which she could display her sense of Romantic style.

Galina Ulanova, the Bolshoi’s foremost interpreter of “Giselle,” coached her in that ballet, and her repertory also included 19th-century classics and contemporary works, especially those choreographed by her husband, Yuri Grigorovich. She made particularly strong impressions as Phrygia, the poignant wife of a rebellious slave in “Spartacus”; Shirien, a fragile woman stricken with a mysterious disease in “Legend of Love,” for which Mr. Grigorovich based much of his choreography on Persian miniature paintings; and Rita, a variety-show dancer seeking to escape the world of the stage in “The Golden Age.”

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These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača), or where concentration camps stood (like Jasenovac and Niš). They were designed by different sculptors (Dušan Džamonja, Vojin Bakić, Miodrag Živković, Jordan and Iskra Grabul, to name a few) and architects (Bogdan Bogdanović, Gradimir Medaković…), conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their “patriotic education”. After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost.