young peasant

2

Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.

On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.

—Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot

Voltron AU

Okay, so imagine an AU where Keith and Lance are little kids. Lance is a young prince and Keith is a young peasant. Keith lives in a little shack with his big brother Shiro. Lance of course lives in the castle. One day, Lance sneaks out of the castle and goes to a field of sunflowers. Why? Cause those are his favorite. While picking some sunflowers, he turns to see another little boy with him. Keith. He doesn’t come off as friendly at first, but soon he warms up to Lance and his cute little jokes. The castle guards arrive after searching for the young prince, and escort Lance back to the castle. But before Lance turns to leave, he gives Keith a little pendent he keeps with him. It’s in the shape of the Voltron logo. Lance smiles and says something along the lines of, “It was nice meeting you! Hope to see you again some time my fair friend!” and waddles off. Keith just stands their and watches Lance leave with the guards, looking down at the pendent blushing. He keeps the pendent for many years, wondering when the time he’ll see Lance again. To most of the kingdom he’s the prince. But to Keith, he’s his first crush, friend, and the one he’s longing for the most. 


Then one day he decides to visit the sunflower field, where he hears a familiar voice…

Also in this AU, their hair is super floofy.

2

I love this artistic rendition of Carl Sagan’s famous quote done by Lana Lou. Below it is the photo of Earth that inspired it. If you’re unfamiliar with his quote, this is from Wikipedia:

During a public lecture at Cornell University in 1994, Carl Sagan presented the image to the audience and shared his reflections on the deeper meaning behind the idea of the pale blue dot:

“We succeeded in taking that picture, and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there – on a mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and in triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

[…] To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish that pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”
— Carl Sagan, speech at Cornell University, October 13, 1994

10 More 1 Sentence Hooks!

1. The Paladin wakes up to find a dead prostitute in their bed, and they don’t remember a thing.

2. While walking down a remote trail the party finds a baby in a basket with a note that says “It’s your problem now”.

3. The local foppish son of a lord has challenged a member of the party to a duel.

4.The party is being chased by some crooked law enforcement and the only place they can hide is the bar of one of the party’s Ex(girl/boyfriend)(Yes, Casablanca)

5. There is a new designer drug that has hit the streets, it has minimal negative effects and is not addictive, but dealers keep ending up dead.

6. A young peasant needs help wooing the duke’s daughter, he offers the location of some lost ruins as a reward.

7. Assassins keep attacking the party, they have nothing on them besides a dagger and some odd coins the players don’t recognize.

8. The dead keep appearing in this small town, several locals have litterally been scared to death.

9. Use of arcane magic is slowly driving all the mages of the kingdom insane

10. A party member receives an official letter from a magistrate telling them that someone they care about has been murdered


-deo

We succeeded in taking that picture, and, if you look at it, you see a dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever lived, lived out their lives. The aggregate of all our joys and sufferings, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilizations, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every hopeful child, every mother and father, every inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species, lived there – on a mote of dust, suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and in triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of the dot on scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner of the dot. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

[…] To my mind, there is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish that pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

- Carl Sagan (died: 20 December 1996)

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it, everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.

The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization. Every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor, explorer. Every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every…superstar. Every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species live there: On a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they can become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Think of the endless cruelties visited by one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of another corner; How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturing, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life, there is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to where our species could migrate. Visit? Yes. Settle? Not yet.

Like it or not for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image.

To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve, and cherish, the Pale Blue Dot.”

–Carl Sagan

Our friend @fintan_magee just painted this striking mural in Bali, Indonesia.
The painting is inspired by Jules Breton ‘Young Peasant Girk with a Hoe’ and it depicts a young girl sitting next to an inflatable tiger. He chose to paint a tiger because of the now-extinct Bali tigers that used to live on the island.
He based his painting in a Realist European painting to draw our attention to the fact that tformer colonial powers played a consequent part in the environnemental damages and the modern tourism industry in Bali. This reminding us that we also have a responsibility to protect thIs beautiful island! #fintanmagee #streetart #mural #tiger #julesbreton #art #bali #indonesia https://www.instagram.com/p/BM6TdKJg3XZ/

unicorn-studying  asked:

What is your favourite quote! :)

It’s a quote from Carl Sagan’s book “Pale Blue Dot”, describing the picture of the Earth, taken from the distance of 6 billion kilometers.

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there–on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

The quote is much longer, I inserted only a part of it here. And despite its’ length, I know it all by heart. It gives me so many feelings.

you can read more about it here!

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

-Carl Sagan

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.“

- Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot, 1994

Image of Earth taken from the craft Voyager 1 on the fringes of our planetary neighbourhood. 

Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand. 

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known. ~ Carl Sagan

@the-jxmes

Beth held the basket in her arms, shuffling through the crowded market to make her way home. She needed to grab some food to accompany their dinner and of course, she was sent out at the busiest time. As the young peasant girl maneuvered out of the crowd, she found herself bumping into someone with her basket falling to the ground, luckily, without losing many of her items. 

“I’m so sorry, I need to watch where I’m go–” Beth stopped when she saw the man before her. He was dressed much differently than everyone else in the square, obviously parading his wealth. 

“I apologize..” Beth whispered, looking immediately down to the ground and shuffling away.