young idols

What wakes me up in the morning:

Is seeing Jimin beat his pre-debut demons and insecurities and grow to become one of Korea’s most respected stage performers that many young idols even look up to.

Is seeing Namjoon go from not loving himself to loving all his faults and transcending that love through all genders, race, colour and language.

Is seeing Jungkook go from shy, reserved and quiet to making friends, learning English to speak with I-fans and getting to perform with his idols.

Is seeing Yoongi fight his battles with mental health issues and using his struggles to express some of the most inspiring and influential songs in kpop history.

Is seeing Seokjin underestimate us all by singing, dancing, playing instruments, going to events and awards shows all while graduating university, proving he is more than just looks but a role model

Is seeing Taehyung be ridiculed, hated and bashed for being different to being the reason of joy, happiness and laughter for all those who have experienced losses in their life

Is seeing Hoseok who despite being bashed for his looks and having low-self confidence continually looks to make others happy, smile and laugh. Calling himself Hope because he wants be to the light in everyone’s life.

this has to stop.

I do not know how to stop this or if it’ll ever stop, but please stop sexualizing underage idols, or any underage person in any case. It is disgusting, disrespectful, rude, and so many other things that not even words can describe. There are many blogs that I’ve seen who sexualize or write sexual things about minors. It is an invasion to their youth and I can’t even describe how disgusting it is. 

Yes, people may say, “it’s not that big of a deal, they’re celebrities and most likely wont see it.” They are celebrities, but celebrities are humans just like all of us, take that into consideration. And yes, they probably won’t see it, but what if they do? You’ll never know. Just imagine how they’d feel. This matter has never affected me personally, but just imagine the look on their faces when they find out people sexualize them when they’re not even legal. And when they do turn to a legal age, I’ve also seen many cases where people don’t even celebrate the fact that they’ve turned 18, but instead they celebrate the fact that they can now sexualize them. Take Jungkook for example, people have started a hashtag saying that Jungkook was legal or that they could now call them “daddy” and write smut about them. Do you really think any idol would ever appreciate that?

Now, I couldn’t give a damn if anyone sexualized an underage idol in their head. It’s your mind, do whatever you want with it. But if you share it with the public, it’s a total different matter. Many people might’ve dealt with this personally. Do you think anyone would like to see someone sexualizing one of their favorite celebrities? Is anyone comfortable with that? If you think this type of action is okay, please take a moment to reconsider.

In some cases, the writing of smut can lead to even more serious problems. The idol could be personally affected by this and nobody would know.

So I just beg of everyone on every social media site, stop sexualizing idols. It’s just such a disgusting thing and I can’t believe I have to take it to the point that I need to write a full on rant about it. It’s a problem everywhere, and I know that these few short paragraphs will barely help, but please, reblog if you want, even if it doesn’t match your blog type. The protection and safety of our young idols is so so much more important. And do more things to help, for example, if you see thing like this happen, report the person. 

Just please.

This has to stop.

30 Days Idol Challenge - Day 6

Hm, this is a bit tricky because it’s difficult to pinpoint a debut for Tom. First theatre play? First television stint? First (major) film role?

So I’ll just go with the youngest/earliest version of Tom haunting the web.

So freaking adorable. I could go on and on…

Tagging my fellow sisters in crime @hiddlesbumlustalot and @noclevernamelbr as well as @bemynightmanager @tinchentitri and @avenger-nerd-mom

Not to sound dramatic but becoming a Kpop Fan is one of the BEST decisions I’ve ever made, and I do not reget it at all.

On Fury Road and the value of non-threatening male heroes

So I’ve been re-watching Fury Road and something struck me;

Tom Hardy’s Max is just really non-threatening. Now, that’s weird on a surface level because in story he’s presented as very dangerous. But here’s the thing about the kind of men we’re used to seeing in action movie; They are threatening in their masculinity.

The capitol A Action hero is a fixture in our cultural awareness. Almost without fail this hero is a man (if you have a woman in the role of action hero, it’s almost always proceeded by her gender. She can’t just be the action hero, she is very clearly cast as a FEMALE action hero.) So our male Action hero  is a badass. He’s dangerous, he’s brooding, he’s tough as nails. Sometimes he’s sarcastic and witty, sometimes he’s a moody stud. Point is, despite cultural changes that we see with our Action heroes as different pop culture trends change the flavoring, these men are all pretty much cut from the same mold. And here’s the thing about your typical Action hero; They have this underlying current of threatening masculinity. To put it bluntly, your typical Action hero is really all about cock. They’re intimidating to both their male peers and the women who are cast opposite them. They are toxic masculinity distilled onto our screens.

Now, in recent years we’ve been seeing more varity in our Action heroes. More emotion. Of course, there have always been exceptions (Luke Skywalker is one of the most note worthy male heroes to break this mold, and I think it’s worth noting that he’s often called whiny. Hell, when I was a little kid I loved him, but as a young teenager I thought he was lame. Now I realize that this might well have been because he wasn’t acting like your typical male hero. Maybe that scared me on some level) Anyway, let’s get back to Hardy’s Max. In story he  starts out as frightening, but he is never threatening in the way of your usual Action hero. He’s feral, dangerous, and unpredictable at the start of our story, but he doesn’t have any of that toxic masculinity.  So, we have a mad Max who is dangerous, and seems mad, as it were.  But there’s none of that hyper male Action hero posturing.

Hardy’s Max is a flawed man whose past has almost driven him past the point of no return. To the other characters in the movies he initially seems to be  feral (they don’t have the benefit of hearing his inner thoughts) Max is a frightening, but he’s not a masculine he-man. In fact, the characters in the movie who fall close to what we’re used to seeing in Action heroes are the warboys and their leader. The culture espoused by Immortan Joe is hyper masculine and toxic. The young men who idolize him seem like extreme versions of what we’re used to with our heroes. They’re brainwashed into a society built on toxic masculinity and objectification, and the heroes of the story are the ones fighting against this idea. Interestingly, Furiosa has a lot of traits of your traditional Action hero, but it’s coupled with compassion and self reflection, not because she’s a woman, but because  she’s  a person. Like Max, she is fighting to regain her humanity through helping a group of young women fight for their freedom from a world of toxic masculinity.

So, again back to Max himself. As the movie goes on he regains his sense of self. A big theme int he movie is the objectification and commodification of human life. We see this with Immortan Joe’s ‘wives” as well as with the brainwashed warboys and the use living humans as ‘bloodbags’ and ‘milkers’ Max starts the movie literally strapped to the hood of a car as a hood ornament/living blood bag.  Max is reluctant to help Furiosa and the ‘wives’ at first, but we see him change in a brief period of time. He  regains his humanity through helping others and coming to terms with his own demons. Hardy’s Max is dangerous, but he’s also vulnerable, undeniably so. We see his fear, we see what haunts him, and we see him struggle to survive, and then struggle to come to terms with his past in order to help others have a future. This sets him apart from Mel Gibson’s Max, and in my opinion makes him the better of the two. By the time Max starts really showing his human side, we see a man who is compassionate and half broken, a man who relearns himself by helping others.

Another notable aspect of Max is his relationship with Furiosa. Usually when your typical Action hero is paired with a STRONG INDEPENDENT WOMAN in a movie, there’s this ongoing dynamic of ‘but you’re a girlllllll’ There isn’t respect, because the heroes of the story are acting out the deeply felt internalized misogyny of our own society. They can’t interact as equals because in our cultural minds they are inherently unequal. They are defined by their rigid gender rules, and they act this out like they’re children on a playground crying about cooties. And of course, there’s usually the sexual element, with the heroes constantly griping at/disrespecting one another while it’s played off as repressed attraction all along.Fury Road never once does this. Max and Furiosa are two flawed and broken people trying to survive. There isn’t a split second where Max stops to wonder how a GIRL can be so tough. Once they’re established as allies, they immediately move into a working relationship built on mutual respect and trust. Two scenes come to mind. Firstly, the initial canon chase when Max first shows himself as an ally. There’s one notable moment where Furiosa is standing up out of the roof and Max hands her a gun. That doesn’t seem important, but there’s something about that gesture that’s very c cinematically important. It shows us that they’re a team now, and it shows us that they trust each other. The second notable scene is the “Don’t breathe” moment in the night bog. Max has previously seen that Furiosa is a good shot. He knows that she is the one to trust with this task, so he hands her the gun and lets her use him as a rifle stand. It’s a moment with no dialogue that speaks volumes.

All of this goes to Max as a nonthreatening hero. He never objectifies, disrespects, or distrusts his counterpart. He’s never an alpha male. He’s part of a story that he doesn’t need to dominate with his manly male maleness. Hardy’s Max is a dangerous, vulnerable, and quietly compassionate man who gives respect and trust where it’s due. He has no need to parade and prove his masculinity. In fact, the people doing that are the villains, and isn’t that telling?