young climbing

“What would you rather be doing?” Picquery asked without so much as a twitch revealing her amusement at his displeasure. ”Sorting through the trash for another Sophia Scapegrace to apprehend?”
“All I’m saying is that I would be much more help out in the field”, he grumbled, "than I am exchanging pleasantries with the social elite.”

I was originally just going to draw younger!Graves in one of these vests, but then background practice happened!
Art blog: questionartbox

5

A young girl climbed up a step ladder to stand at the podium before a tense Charlotte City Council meeting.

Petite in size, with braids in her hair and hearts on her t-shirt, Zianna Oliphant collected herself and delivered her message loud and clear.

“It’s a shame that our fathers and mothers are killed and we can’t see them anymore. It’s a shame that we have to go to their graveyard and bury them. We need our fathers and mothers to be by our side.”

  • Nico: And, whoa! You're the wine dude? No way!
  • Mr. D: The wine dude?
  • Nico: Dionysus, right? Oh, wow! I've got your figurine.
  • Mr. D: My figurine.
  • Nico: In my game, Mythomagic. And a holofoil card, too! And even though you've only got like five hundred attack points and everybody thinks you're the lamest god card, I totally think your powers are sweet!
  • Mr. D: Ah. Well, that's… gratifying.

In light of the events of the latest episode, which I’m choosing to ignore, I thought I’d make a list of a few random Clexa facts about their life after Lexa survives the bullet, which is canon of course. So…

  • Clarke loves watching Lexa interact with the Nightbloods. Whether she is training them or teaching them or just listening to them, Clarke loves this side of Lexa, supportive and encouraging and never patronizing or aggressive, not even during the toughest training sessions. She often finds herself wondering if Lexa acts like this with them because she never experienced this type of support and kindness during her upbringing.
  • Lexa could spend hours watching Clarke draw. Eyebrows creased in concentration, tip of her tongue between her teeth, blue eyes shining with a particularly bright spark, she is both the cutest and most fascinating creature Lexa has ever laid eyes on.
  • Lexa is a lightweight. As Heda, even during special occasions or celebrations, she’s been taught that she must always keep her head clear. She almost never indulges in drinking and has never developed a tolerance for it. So when on a freezing winter day Clarke steals a bottle of wine and decides she and Lexa are spending the day in their room, eating and drinking and just relaxing, she finds out that it doesn’t take long for the Commander to get drunk. All flushed cheeks and bubbly laughs and surprisingly inclined to cuddle, she’s never been more adorable. Okay, maybe only when she’s hungover and she’s trying to look like she isn’t.
  • Clarke can’t use a sword for the life of her. She’s just terrible with it. But her aim is good, and she finds she is pretty good with a bow and arrow. After some time spent perfecting her skills, Lexa tells her even Anya would be impressed.
  • Lexa trains hard and often to keep her body strong and her reflexes sharp. First time Clarke stops by to watch her train, she finds herself completely enthralled by it. The elegance and fluidity of Lexa’s movements, the toned muscles rippling under the skin… it’s safe to say Clarke discovers a new turn-on. From that day on, whenever Lexa comes back from training, Clarke jumps on her and ravages her.
  • Clarke loves tracing Lexa’s tattoos and scars (yes she has scars) and asks the story behind each of them. Some reveal funny stories of a stubborn young Lexa climbing on a far-too-high tree just to impress Costia, and miserably falling from it. “Her laugh was worth the pain, though.” Others reveal sorrow of a young girl forced to fight and kill the kids she’d grown up with and considered brothers and sisters. Lexa doesn’t cry when she talks about her Conclave. Clarke wonders if it’s because she already spilled all the tears she had for them years ago.
  • Costia is a different story. Even if not an open wound anymore, even if Clarke knows Lexa loves her, she also knows the pain over Costia’s death will always be a part of Lexa. But she doesn’t want that to obscure any other memory of someone that was so important to Lexa. So, Clarke asks her stories about Costia. She makes Lexa talk about her, what she was like, how they met, the way her laughter sounded. She does her best to cleanse Costia’s memory for Lexa, so she can think about her and remember something other than pain and sadness.
  • Lexa doesn’t remember her parents. When she describes her family, she talks about Anya and Gustus.
  • Clarke cries when she talks about her father. Lexa holds her.
  • They both have an obsession for each other’s hands. Clarke loves how lithe and elegant Lexa’s look: how strong they are when she is gripping a sword or handling a weapon, and how delicate and gentle when she is caressing Clarke’s body. Lexa is in awe of how skilled Clarke’s are: how they turn simple lines of charcoal on paper into masterpieces and how they’re capable of healing people and literally bring life. Oh, Lexa loves kissing them a lot.
  • Sometimes they have to separate. Clarke goes back to Arkadia for a while or Lexa has to visit other Clans. They crave each other the whole time. When they’re back together, sex is always a little more desperate and passionate than usual.
  • One time a group of rebel dissidents kidnaps Clarke on her way back to Polis to use her as leverage against Lexa. It takes less than three days for Lexa to find her and rescue her. Bloodied and bruised, but alive. Lexa rushes her back to Arkadia so that Abby can heal her. Clarke has never seen Lexa cry like the moment she wakes up, but she is not surprised. She knows this is Lexa’s worst nightmare, she knows she can’t bear to lose her like she lost Costia. She knows, because she felt the same when a bullet meant for her almost killed Lexa.
  • They sleep wrapped around each other. Clarke rests her head on Lexa’s chest, finding comfort in the steady sound of her heartbeat, and Lexa holds her close with an arm.
  • They’re happy.
8

Page 23

Frisk, I know the little sh*t kinda deserved it but breaking his nose probably wasn’t the right way to go…

if you recognize the colour of the kid’s font, you’ll probably have an idea on who he’s talking about who climbed the mountain, of course the uncle was very young when he climbed that mountain, probably carried a notebook…..
and Frisk might be acting a lot like Sans….but that last panel was all Undyne

read from the beginning HERE

The “Green Man” is an urban legend which originated in Pennsylvania and is said to be a glowing supernatural entity or a demon which wanders the country roads at night. This is one urban legend that has truth behind it and the truth is a lot more upsetting than scary.

In 1918, Raymond Robinson, who was just a young boy, was climbing on a train track bridge to get a closer look at some birds when he was electrocuted. The shock sent 22,000 volts of electricity through his body and literally melted his face - he lost both of his eyes, his nose, an ear, and even an arm. As Raymond grew up, he was bullied by other kids, who mocked him by calling him cruel names such as “The Zombie” and because of this, he chose to stay indoors. The very rare time he would venture outside was at nights when he would walk along State Route 351 with his walking stick. Locals caught wind of this and would go out at night in an attempt to catch a glimpse of Raymond - some would mock him as he walked alone while others were friendly.

Raymond stopped these late night walks during the last years of his life and moved to the Beaver County Geriatric Center where he died when he was 74-years-old. The real story of what Raymond experienced became obscured and overshadowed by the ghost stories that grew out of them and Raymond became more of an urban legend than a sentient being who was ostracised by the community purely due to his appearance.

The Fairy King

I am not a man who believes in the supernatural. I work a 9-5 in a 30th floor office suite, surrounded by familiar, reliable representations of human ingenuity–steel and glass and wall-to- wall carpeting. I deal in managing the personal holdings of those more successful than me, and am occasionally tossed a small raise by my disinterested boss. When the setting sun begins to bleed through my vertical shades, I ride the hermetically sealed elevator down to the parking garage, climb into my 2010 Honda Civic, and traverse the 25 miles to my two-story house in the suburbs. For the past thirty years, my life has taken a predictable and comfortably tedious trajectory. Strange dreams, always half-forgotten by morning, sometimes trouble my nights, but who among us doesn’t have nightmares?

My wife Elizabeth was supposed to drive Jenny to summer camp, but something at her work came up last minute, and so I found myself heading northwest on I-89. It was a Sunday and there were few other vehicles on the road. Though it was almost noon and the sun was high overhead, the trees and underbrush by the sides of the highway blocked out most of the sunlight, creating a solemn, almost foreboding atmosphere. My step-daughter, nose buried in a book as usual, wasn’t a natural conversationalist, and after a few attempts to engage her, I gave up and allowed myself to be lulled by the relentless chorus of the cicadas.

I hadn’t been in this part of the state since my early childhood, when my parents had rented a small weekend house deep in the Vermont woods. It isn’t as though I actively avoided returning to The Kingdom–I was simply a middle-aged, middle-class American whose solitary childhood imaginings belonged to the distant past, to the realm of make-believe, of half-remembered nightmares. And yet…

There it was, the familiar dirt road winding into the forest, and then almost unconsciously I was slowing down, pulling off to the side of the road to a conveniently-located rest stop. Jenny looked up from her book and regarded me with some trepidation.

“It’s all right,” I reassured her. “We have plenty of time. I just want to show you the place where I used to spend my summers, when I was around your age.”

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3

this was supposed to be a shallura tangled au but this isnt even in the actual movie lmao

anyway, allura grew up with magical growing hair that glows different colors depending on her mood, and lived in a tower since she was young till an escapee climbed into her tower to hide

bonus klance (this au probs only have side klance tho lol):

cant believe how dumb they are that person is literally just next to you–

Traditional Catalan castellers in front of the Cathedral of Barcelona.

Photo by Harriet Coombs on 500px

Human towers formed by ‘castellers’. La Mercè festival, Barcelona, 21st September 2013.
The aim of the Castellers is to build a human tower and have a young child climb to the very top of the tower and stand up. It requires a tremendous amount of planning and teamwork to build a human tower and it is quite an amazing sight to see.

Wrong Side (Peter Parker x Reader)

Heeeelllooooo again, people, this is Michelle, coming at you with a brand new Spidey imagine which totally did not take me like 5 months to write and finish. In case you’re wondering why my requests are closed, it’s not because I suddenly got very popular and everyone wanted me to write for them. No, it’s because your girl Michelle here just can’t focus on one thing for a very long time so I will eventually open them up again, just be prepared to not receive the imagine within a couple of weeks. Alright, that’s it. Michelle out.

Fandom: Spiderman, Marvel, Avengers (I guess…?)

Request: Again…just my weird, random mind

Pairing: Peter Parker x Reader

Notes/Warning: Well there’s a fight scene involving superpowers (obviously), sass/snark/whatever you call this, proofread by  @kruemelmonszter-blog 

Word count: 1465 words


Being Tony Starks daughter isn’t easy. It has its ups and downs, but mostly downs, if we’re being honest here. And the fact that said daughter has some cool superpowers given to her by some not so cool scientist didn’t make life that much easier. During Loki’s attack on New York, Hydra decided to take the opportunity while everyone was being distracted by a neglected God trying to turn Earth into his second home. So, they send their best agents, including the Winter Soldier, so this was some big shit for them as you can guess, to kidnap the one and only (Y/N) Stark. When the Avengers rescued her from a secret Hydra base, she, at first, didn’t recognize any of them, but after explaining everything to her and giving her time to get her memories back and remember everything got back to normal. Well, not completely, obviously. With her newly gained, more like injected, powers, (Y/N) needed training and so the team helped her.

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Book recs for Slytherins!

Gif source | More recs: slytherin (pt. 2),  hufflepuff (pt. 1 and pt. 2), ravenclaw (pt. 1 and pt. 2), gryffindor (pt. 1 and pt. 2) | text by @viegsen and @juan-nieves

House traits: ambitious, cunning, resourceful, shrewd, achievement-oriented, planner, strong leader, sense of self-preservation, disregard for rules, self-interested, exclusive (but with strong ties within exclusive groups)

  • THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, by Oscar Wilde - horror - Slytherins care a lot about power, we know that much. Power comes from different sources and in different forms though, and in this classic you’ll find a man that goes above and beyond to gain the particular kind of power that comes with youth and beauty, and he will do anything to maintain it. On top of all that, this book has a really weird/great mix of decadence and elegance that gives it a very unique feel that I think a Slytherin would quite appreciate.
  • SNOBS, by Julian Fellowes - fiction - Set in England in the 1990s, Snobs is a kind of fictional tell-all on Edith Lavery, a social climbing young woman who is determined to marry well, and ends up nabbing a kind but extremely dull Earl. Edith is perfectly aware that she is marrying a man who bores her to death for his money and position, and the reader follows this unapologetically cunning and ambitious woman as she navigates the ups and downs of life in the British upper class.
  • THE PRINCE, by Machiavelli - non fiction - In what is possibly the most Slytherin work ever, Machiavelli breaks with the Catholic doctrine of his time to counsel princes that the actions of State leaders need not be guided by the morality of the common man. The ends of the Prince (survival, honor, glory) justify the means used to achieve them. This has greatly influenced the Realist theory of International Reations, and Niccòlo’s advice is still interesting even for the non-politically inclined Slytherin: for example, the advice that a Prince should not leave his fate to chance, but rather make his own fortune, through hard work, prudence, virtue (not the Catholic kind), risk-taking and the ability to adapt to different circumstances.
  • PERFUME, by Patrick Süskind - historical fiction; horror - Ok, so you might think this book only highlights the more stereotypical side of the Slytherin house, but hear me out: here you have a story that portrays ambition, dedication, power, and clearly set goals in a way that you don’t really find in a lot of books. You get the chance to read about a man who is capable of doing anything in order to fulfill his goal, and who learns how to deal with people in a way that benefits him. What is also great about this book is that you get to read about a kind of power that is not really related to money, but to something that you might not even associate with the idea of power: smells. This books is also written beautifully, in such a way that you don’t even understand how descriptions of filth and shit can sound so poetic.
  • DEVIL IN WINTER, by Lisa Kleypas - historical romance - Cunning, resourceful and quite amoral, the “hero” of this novel is your quintessential Slytherin. He made some (less than favourable) appearances in other novels in this series (which you don’t have to read in order), and in Devil in Winter, he enters into a marriage of convenience with a woman he barely knows (who’s escaping abusive relatives) because she’s a heiress. Now isn’t it adorable when a Slytherin falls in love and puts all that ruthlessness and shrewdness in service of their loved one?
  • THE HEIRESS EFFECT, by Courtney Milan - historical romance - There is no question that the hero in this historical romance is a huge Slytherin. A son of a farmer who is making his way to the top, he is really, really, REALLY ambitious, a natural leader, and not above doing extremely morally dubious things to achieve his ends, either. Would he give up all his plans for the love of a woman who is wrong for him in every way?
  • MASTER OF CROWS, by Grace Draven - fantasy romance - Master of Crows is about Silhara, a renegade wizard who is tempted into selling his soul for the promise of limitless power, and Martise, a slave who volunteers to spy on him and betray him in order to win her own freedom. As they fall in love, their needs and ambitions pull them in different directions.
  • DIPLOMACY, by Henry Kissinger - non fiction - If you’re a Slytherin who’s into history or politics, this is fascinating stuff. Kissinger writes about some of History’s greatest leaders and diplomats, like Richelieu, Metternich and Bismarck, and discusses at length the power plays in international politics.
  • THE GREAT GATSBY, by F. Scott Fitzgerald - fiction - I mean… do I even have to say anything? If they read Muggle books, this one (a super rare first edition or something like that, probably) would totally be in the Malfoys’ personal library.
  • THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, by Isabel Allende - magical realism - A family saga where class and ambition are very clearly depicted. Two things make it even better and add a bit of diversity to the Slytherin house: it’s focuses on three generations of women, and it’s set in a Latin American country.
  • WUTHERING HEIGHTS, by Emily Brontë - romance - Ah, if this isn’t a great source of Slytherin angst! Besides Catherine and Heathcliff’s dramatic love story that most of you probably know pretty well, here it’s precisely in Heathcliff that you get to see just how effectively Slytherins can use their drive and resourcefulness to get where they want in life.
  • FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD, by Thomas Hardy - romance - Bathsheba Everdene, a young and independent woman, comes into an inheritance that leads her to Weatherbury, where she has to deal with tons of shitty people and difficult situations in order to make a name for herself in a time and place where women are at a clear disadvantage. You’ll find in Bathsheba a clever Slytherin woman that knows exactly her worth; who uses her ambition, intelligence and resourcefulness to be the master of her own life and destiny, and to build a place for her within a society that continually tries to dominate her.
  • CRAZY RICH ASIANS, by Kevin Kwan - contemporary - There are lots of threads to this book. You have super rich, ultra-elitist people who will do anything to stop the “undesirables” from marrying into their Noble and Most Ancient family. You have ambitious, cunning people who would trample all over everyone, including their children, to achieve their ends. You also have privileged but kind people trying to balance their wants with what is expected of them by their family and their social circle. Lots of Slytherins in this highly entertaining story. The sequel China Rich Girlfriend is already out, btw.