you look like a rice farmer

anonymous asked:

Out of curiosity and also to make my self feel better because chapter 3 of WTL made me cry, do they end up reborn in better places?

Horio gets reborn as the son of a relatively well-off merchant. He’s the youngest of six, which…pretty much means he gets picked on all the time. But he also gets babied a lot, and so he grows up slightly spoiled, bratty, and overall a pain in the ass, but a well-meaning one. 

As for Tatsuya…Tatsuya gets reborn as the son of a rice farmer. It’s a simple life, not glamorous at all, but it’s peaceful, he has parents who love him, and he never has to worry about going hungry. 

He also has a little sister, five years younger than him. She has fluffy jet-black hair (”Like feathers,” he teases her. “My little bird, that’s what you are.”) and pale violet eyes that shimmer like jewels and he adores her more than anything else in the world. Sometimes though, he’ll look at her and feel a sharp sense of deja vu. Because he’ll see a ghost of someone else in her features (someone with ink-black hair and jewel-like violet eyes and a smile that’s beautiful in how honest it is) and he’ll feel something twist in his chest, something a lot like longing. It passes though (it always passes) and if he happens to hold his sister a little tighter on those days, well, that’s no one’s business but his. 

(When she was born, his parents had asked him if he had any ideas for names, and without even thinking about it, he’d blurted out “Hisana.” To this day, he still doesn’t understand why he’d responded that way– after all, he’s never met a Hisana in his life. Still, there’s something about that name and the way it slips past his lips–instinctual, as easy as breathing– that makes him think he made the right choice.) 

Bachelor 2: Quinn

Bio: Quinn is a farmer, but is exceedingly bad at it. All his crops die, his cows get sick, and what he does manage to grow turns out fowl. He looks to you for farming tips, especially after you become a big success. He’s happy and optimistic, and doesn’t let his failures get him down. He loves dairy products.

Starting weight: 145

Favorite gift: Pizza
Loves: Cheese, cheesy bread, butter
Likes: Mashed potatoes, cake, cupcakes, brownies
Dislikes: Stir fry, fried rice, carrot cake
Hates: carrots

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Creepypasta #612: A Little Mountain Village

Story length: Long

In the 70’s my uncle applied for a job teaching English in Japan. My family says he came back a physical and mental wreck. I finally got him to tell me what happened. This is his story in his words…

Back then the Japanese government was just starting to bring people over to teach English. I applied, but never heard anything back, moved on. A few months later I get a call from some guy saying he works for a Japanese recruiting agency and that they desperately need a teacher for some rural town; says he got my info from the government. I was happy as hell and accepted, the next month I’m on a plane to Japan. (By the way, I didn’t speak Japanese.)

I knew it was going to be rural, but when I got there my stomach sank. The town, or should I say village, was literally on the side of a mountain. It was named “Inaka” and maybe 500 people lived there. Forget advanced technology or salarymen, I’m talking about farmers, rice patties, dirt roads, traditional houses. Place looked like it was out of a history book.

There was one paved path, it was steep as hell and climbed from the road at the foot of the mountain up to Inaka. Driving up the path was only safe in a 4-wheel drive; in the icy winter it was completely inaccessible. I’m not gonna’ lie when you got up there the place was beautiful, in a day trip kind of way. Staying there for a year though, I wanted to cry. But I had signed a one-year contract and didn’t want to be the unreliable Gaijin. Plus, what did I have to lose? It was only one year.

Things got a little better when I met the person who would be my companion for the next year. Her name was Yuki and she saved my life. She was maybe 30 years old. I wouldn’t say a bombshell, but definitely easy on the eyes. Cute face, nice smile, friendly, and best of all, she spoke English. She showed me around, got me set up in my apartment. (And by apartment I mean a fucking stone age dwelling) and basically became my one friend. I was literally getting paid to correctly pronounce English and get the students used to being around foreign people, plus Yuki and I really hit it off, things seemed good.

Didn’t really notice anything off until she introduced me to the locals. At first I just chalked it up to the fact that we couldn’t communicate; cultural differences and all that. But was it normal for them to keep staring at me with those glassy eyed looks. Felt as is they were looking right through me. And why were they all so quiet, even with each other. I guess Yuki sensed what I was feeling “Don’t worry, they are very shy. That’s why we need you.” That was my first sign that something was off. I got my next sign a couple of days later when I started classes and met the lifeless mannequins that were Inaka’s “children”.

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In America, “the squeaky wheel gets the grease.” In Japan, “the nail that stands out gets pounded down.” American parents who are trying to induce their children to eat their suppers are fond of saying “think of the starving kids in Ethiopia, and appreciate how lucky you are to be different from them.” Japanese parents are likely to say “Think about the farmer who worked so hard to produce this rice for you; if you don’t eat it, he will feel bad, for his efforts will have been in vain” (H. Yamada, February 16,1989). A small Texas corporation seeking to elevate productivity told its employees to look in the mirror and say “I am beautiful” 100 times before coming to work each day. Employees of a Japanese supermarket that was recently opened in New Jersey were instructed to begin the day by holding hands and telling each other that “he” or “she is beautiful” (“A Japanese Supermarket,” 1989).


The American examples stress attending to the self, the appreciation of one’s difference from others, and the importance of asserting the self. The Japanese examples emphasize attending to and fitting in with others and the importance of harmonious interdependence with them.

—  Culture and the Self, Markus and Kitayama, 1991

One Direction Photo Challenge Day 14 (Lo)

Who You Think is the Best Dressed : Zayn Malik

OK not gonna lie I didn’t spend as much time on this as I would have liked. But I’m going with my gut and also agreeing with Li. I don’t recall Zayn ever having a fashion disaster, or me thinking What the heck is he wearing? I mean we’ve had Harry as a rice farmer, Louis’s bright blue pants, Liam’s shirt tied around waist thing, Niall’s- OK I don’t have one for Niall at the moment but he dresses pretty casual so.. Zayn wins!!! His style looks perfect on him!!