you learn how to read it first

anonymous asked:

I joined in February and it took me 10 days to read shit ton of masterposts (thank you, bulletproofhalo & tellmethisisnotlove) and to completely fail like 5 exams in the meantime (I retook them, it's ok) and watching videos when not reading and then I spent a few days on catching up with what was happening at that time and honestly I know I'm capable of learning really fast but that was my damn record

hdjkhsdjks how you didn’t die omg 

Today on World Refugee Day, we commemorate the courage, strength, and perseverance of refugees, asylum seekers, and internaly displaced people. There are currently over 65 million refugees in today’s world–the highest number in recorded history. They have been forced to flee their home due to life threatening conditions ranging from drought and famine to religious persecution or war. Now, more than ever, it is time to #StandWithRefugees and raise awareness to the plights and obstacles they face.

We hosted our first Issue Time dealing with how the global community can support, improve the position of and stand in solidarity with refugees, and communicate how and why refugees are human beings, just like us, first and foremost. Our panel, Madge Thomas, Deputy-Director of Global Policy and Advocacy, Global Citizen, Piper Perabo; Actress, Activist, and IRC Voice; International Rescue Committee, Elmo, Sesame Street Muppet, Sherrie Westin, EVP for Global Impact and Philanthropy, Sesame Workshop and Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait, answered your questions here.

Looking for for some actions you can take right now?

- Millions of children around the world are in crisis – because of conflicts and disasters, many of them will never learn to read or write, or even enter a classroom. Ahead of World Refugee Day, Global Citizen will host our first Issue Time panel on our Tumblr page. Sign the petition to ask world leaders to pledge to the Education Cannot Wait fund for kids in crisis.

- The worst humanitarian crisis since World War II has ripped apart families, left children out of school, destroyed homes and revealed some ugly sides of humanity. But many people around the world have continued to support and provide for refugees with open arms, whether they’re individuals or governments. Write a letter to a refugee to show your support.

- Globally over 65 million people are forcibly displaced. They have left everything behind, fleeing from conflict, violence and natural disasters. Ahead of World Refugee Day, Global Citizen will host our first Issue Time panel on our Tumblr page. Sign the petition to urge the 20 most powerful countries to protect and support refugees everywhere.

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes

by Stephen King
(reprinted in Sylvia K. Burack, ed. The Writer’s Handbook. Boston, MA: Writer, Inc., 1988: 3-9)

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn.  It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction.  But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.



II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do.  I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit.  In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction.  These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor’s approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.

He told me he needed a sports writer and we could “try each other out” if I wanted.

I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.

Gould nodded and said, “You’ll learn.”

I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.

I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he’d have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here’s an example:

(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King’s original copy)

Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as “Bullet” Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953….

(after edit marks)

Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon’s basketball team since 1953….

When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.

“I only took out the bad parts, you know,” he said. “Most of it’s pretty good.”

“I know,” I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. “I won’t do it again.”

“If that’s true,” he said, “you’ll never have to work again. You can do this for a living.” Then he threw back his head and laughed.

And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don’t expect ever to have to work again.



III. The Second Introduction

All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.

I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he’s talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould’s little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.

So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It’ll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away…if you listen.



IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1.  BE TALENTED
This, of course, is the killer.  What is talent?  I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with “what is the meaning of life?” for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness.  For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money.  If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.

Now some of you are really hollering.  Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep.  And some of you are calling me bad names.  Are you calling Harold Robbins talented?  someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching.  V.C. Andrews?  Theodore Dreiser?  Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?

Nonsense.  Worse than nonsense, off the subject.  We’re not talking about good or bad here.  I’m interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who’s good or bad.  As a rule the critical judgments come after the check’s been spent, anyway.  I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself.  People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have.  Ergo, they are communicating.  Ergo, they are talented.  The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn’t get paid.  If you’re not talented, you won’t succeed.  And if you’re not succeeding, you should know when to quit.

When is that?  I don’t know.  It’s different for each writer.  Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty.  But after six hundred?  Maybe.  After six thousand?  My friend, after six thousand pinks, it’s time you tried painting or computer programming.

Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters…maybe a commiserating phone call.  It’s lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices…unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement.  I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible.  If your eyes are open, you’ll know which way to go…or when to turn back.

2.  BE NEAT
Type.  Double-space.  Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff.  If you’ve marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3.  BE SELF-CRITICAL
If you haven’t marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job.  Only God gets things right the first time.  Don’t be a slob.

4.  REMOVE EVERY EXTRANEOUS WORD
You want to get up on a soapbox and preach?  Fine.  Get one and try your local park.  You want to write for money?  Get to the point.  And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can’t find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again…or try something new.

5.  NEVER LOOK AT A REFERENCE BOOK WHILE DOING A FIRST DRAFT You want to write a story?  Fine.  Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus.  Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket.  The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time.  Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.  There are no exceptions to this rule.  You think you might have misspelled a word?  O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later.  Why not?  Did you think it was going to go somewhere?  And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland?  You can check it…but laterWhen you sit down to write, write.  Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6.  KNOW THE MARKETS
Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall’s.  Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy…but people do it all the time.  I’m not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines.  If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion?  Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top?  If you like science fiction, read the magazines.  If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines.  And so on.  It isn’t just a matter of knowing what’s right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine’s entire slant.  Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7.  WRITE TO ENTERTAIN
Does this mean you can’t write “serious fiction”?  It does not.  Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap.  This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others.  But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around.  I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8.  ASK YOURSELF FREQUENTLY, AM I HAVING FUN?”
The answer needn’t always be yes.  But if it’s always no, it’s time for a new project or a new career.

9.  HOW TO EVALUATE CRITICISM
Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say.  Listen carefully to what they tell you.  Smile and nod a lot.  Then review what was said very carefully.  If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn’t work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet.  It doesn’t matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is.  If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I’d still suggest changing it.  But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10.  OBSERVE ALL RULES FOR PROPER SUBMISSION
Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11.  AN AGENT?  FORGET IT.  FOR NOW
Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients.  10% of nothing is nothing.  Agents also have to pay the rent.  Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life.  Flog your stories around yourself.  If you’ve done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete.  And remember Stephen King’s First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don’t need one until you’re making enough for someone to steal…and if you’re making that much, you’ll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12.  IF IT’S BAD, KILL IT
When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law.  When it comes to fiction, it is the law.



That’s everything you need to know.  And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want.  Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.

My ten minutes are up.

Fanfiction rant

My parents never liked my reading fanfiction and actively attempted to stop me. Me, being a rebellious teen at the time, obviously found ways round this.


Point is, one of my parents arguments was how much time I spent reading the /quote/ “stupid things” (excuse me?! But true😂) and I wasn’t learning anything (yeah riiiiiiight)


Do you know how many things I’ve learnt from fanfiction??


From Court cases, to latin, to basic first aid, to extensive knowledge on pressure points and how to use them when torturing (oops 😂). And honestly, those are just the ones I can think of the top of my head.


I’ve learnt soooo much knowledge from fanfiction that I constantly practice in my daily life, I wouldn’t be anywhere without it.


Point is, fanfiction is actually, despite the evidence against it (sleep deprivation, reading stories totally not for your age cuz let’s be honest, none of us paid attention to those 18+ warnings😂), really good for you and educational.


Praise the writers, cuz in maybe 50 yrs time, your gonna remember some random fanfiction fact and it’s gonna save your life.


Its proven true so far in my (short) life.

How to Read Energy and What to Expect

As many of you know, one service I offer on this blog are energy readings. I have gotten a lot of inquiries on how I do these readings, so I would like to inform you on my methods as well give you tips on how to do them yourself. Please note that I am not an expert nor do I have the final say on how to do energy readings properly, this is just my experience. 

Understanding Energy
The way I understand energy is as the force that inhabits everything at one point or another. Everything has an energy signature, down to the smallest grain of sand. However, the energy of living things is a bit different. There have been many names given to this energy but it is most often known as one’s life force. The hardest part of an energy reading is picking up on one’s particular energy among the trillions of energy sources swirling around at any given moment, but I will tell you how I do this.


How to Read Someone’s Energy

My method for reading energy is going to be different from everyone else’s. Your method for reading energy will be different from everyone else’s. Everyone has their own techniques for reading energy, but here are a few of mine.

  1. Sit in a comfortable location with at least part of you pressed firmly against the ground. 
  2. If you are reading for someone irl, have them sit near you. Physical contact often helps if both of you are comfortable with that. 
  3. If you are reading for someone not physically present, it can help to have a piece of them “sit” in front of you. I ask for names and blog urls when I do my readings so that I have an energy signature to focus on but you really can use anything or nothing at all, whatever helps you get a lock on the other person’s energy. 
  4. Sit in front of the person or blog and close your eyes. A bit of meditation before you try to tap into their energy is a good idea.
  5. Feel the energy of the earth under you and feel out this individual’s energy as it appears, a piece of the earth just like you.
  6. Grab onto this energy. Snatch it from the earth just briefly. Images, smells, tastes, sounds, colors, and feelings should come to you as you feel their energy. Keep a mental note of what you experience and write it down once you return.
  7. What you have experienced while feeling someone’s energy is their energy reading. It may be a bit of a jumbled mess, but that’s okay. Everyone’s energy is different but there may also be some overlap, which is also okay.

You can give someone their energy reading in many forms. I give mine as a paragraph with everything I saw, yours may be only a line or two. Everyone experiences different things when reading energy and having shorter readings isn’t a bad thing. You may even pick up on more or less energy from each individual. Its totally okay if some readings are long and others very short. 


So…. What if your energy reading doesn’t resonate with me, like, at all?

There could be a great number of reasons your reading went screwy. As I said before, energy can neither be created nor destroyed, it simply changes shape. This being said, it could be a number of factors.

  1. I am picking up not on your energy, but the energy of someone very close to you. If you have been in contact with them recently, pieces of your energy sometimes clings to them. 
  2. It could also be that I am reading into the energy of one of your past lives, something you won’t necessarily resonate with or remember.
  3. It could also be that the reading was accurate but maybe some part of it was hard to hear, or some repressed memory. This is not the fault of the reader, in the long run it is up to the client to interpret the reading. 
  4. It could also be external factors in my own life clouding my ability to pick up on your energy. My cat knocks over a vase in another room and not thinking I write that in as your energy because I was so lost in the moment.
  5. It could also be you’re my last in a long line of energy readings and I am exhausted and hurriedly trying to get through your reading without paying attention to detail. 
  6. It could be any number of things, all acting upon one another. Keep an open mind. 

Whatever the reason for your energy reading not being accurate, it is best to just be polite and move on. No good will come of harassing a reader, especially if they are offering a free service. 


I just did an energy reading and I’m exhausted!

Yup, that’s a real thing and totally normal. Energy readings can be draining, especially for beginners, as you expend some of your energy when you tap into the earth and go out in search of other energies. This is especially draining at first if you have not yet learned how to shield your energy when searching in the energy field and subsequently some of it may be leeched out. Here are some self care tips to help you regenerate faster.

  1. Time yourself. I like to light a stick of incense before I start my readings. Once it is completely burned out, I stop no matter what I’m doing and go drink some water and just do something I enjoy for 30 minutes or so before returning to readings. 
  2. Eat or drink something sugary or high in carbohydrates while you read to return energy lost. I like to munch on sweet cherries while I read.
  3. Learn to shield yourself from energy drain. I imagine my energy dressed in a suit of impenetrable armor before I search out someone’s energy. Your shield can come in any manor of form, find one that feels right to you and keeps the pesky energy leech out. 
  4. Take little breaks in between readings, even just a minute or two to catch your breath. 
  5. Use crystals to return your energy. I like to take some moon-charged amethyst and hold it in my palm during breaks, feeling its energy flow into me. 
  6. Practice self care. Shower, change your clothes, put on some lotion or makeup… Anything like that will help replenish energy.
  7. Take a nap! I have a bad habit of doing energy readings as soon as I wake up and then I’m dead for the rest of the day. Napping helps immensely. 
  8. Know your limits. You probably won’t be able to do 20 energy readings your first day. Pacing is so important.
  9. If you are doing energy readings online, be prepared to use the block button. Some people are going to be rude, but that is their problem not yours.
  10. Have fun! If energy readings become stressful take a break. If someone is waiting on you for their energy reading, they will understand if it comes a little late. If not, fuck ‘em. You don’t owe anything to people who don’t care about your well being as a reader. 

There are a great many things you can do to recharge after an energy reading, but these are just a few of my favorites. Everyone is different, and respecting that is key. 

Remember actually enjoying yourself is key. Good luck with your energy readings!

  1. read classics - I know from experience its a slow but steady climb when it comes to reading classics, but it’s a worth while experience to put yourself in world that so different from the world now but mirrors it quite the same. Reading classical opens you mind to how simple but complex the human race is. It might seem like chore especially if your not a reader but you can start by just picking a classical that ficinated you the most  and listening to it on audiobook first. After a couple times of listening on audiobook you’ll get used to rhythm of the language and it’ll be easier to continue reading on your own. Also, pro tips- if you really wanna kick it up a notch, write a short review for every classic you read to help retain the info. 
  2. expand your genres-  Everyones knows there’s a lot to be learned from movies, tv show and music but for most of us, once we learn what kind of genres we like we tend to never branch out and this limits our learning. You don’t have to like every genre but exposing yourself to different styles of music and movies teaches you tolerance and after a while of forcing yourself to do this, you might find your pallet start to shift.  
  3. watch youtube videos- This is one of my favorite ways to not only be entertained but to get a general overview of a certain topic, usually if it sparks my interest i’ll do a little further research. Youtube channels such as ted-ed, asap science, scishow and today i found out do an amazing job of giving you a little bit of knowledge about everything.
  4. listen to people who have different opions than you- I know this one is particularly hard one for most people, but your going to learn the least from having repeptive conversations with people with the same ideas as you. People with different opinions than you will have an impact on how you live your life wether you like it or not; its not your job to accept their ways of thinking but to understand why they think the way they do- you never know, you might just find that the other persons opinion has some merit and might make you more knowlegable about a certain situation. A great way to do this is to watch interviews, read articles about the opposing side of your opinion.
  5. Accept that you’ll never know everything- This is an important one, you may be thinking, how does this have to do with educating myself? well, I added this one because I truly feel like you can’t educate yourself without acknowledging your ignorance. A person who thinks they know eveything has no room to learn. One of the most powerful ways to educate your self is to accept that you are never going to be finished learning, this opens you up and makes you more receptive to lessons we learn in life everyday. So in short, if you want to be more educated, just live! we’re all life long students and that’s okay. 

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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bts scenario: learning korean

i changed this a little, so i hope you don’t mind. also, this is honestly so cute, learning a language for someone else is just so sweet in my eyes and aw aw. anyway, i hope you enjoy! 

raising money for my pet’s tumor removal (please read this)

++++

jin: jin softly shut the door behind him as he walked into the quiet house. “babe?” you were sat at a desk, headphones in your ears. jin quietly peaked over your shoulder and tried to take a glance at what you were looking at. ‘한국어’ the title of the worksheet read, which made jin’s eyes widen. leaning forward, jin placed a soft kiss on the exposed skin of your neck as he pointed to the correct answer. “i can’t believe your learning korean,” jin said. you shyly shrugged your shoulders, “i want to learn it. for you.”

Originally posted by jinactor

yoongi: “is that korean?” the sound of yoongi’s voice behind you made you jump in your chair as your frantically tried to cover your work. yoongi laughed at your flustered expression, “baby don’t be shy,” he smirked, “i think it’s cute that you’re learning korean, now you’ll understand my dirty talk.” yoongi’s mouth came close to your ear as he whispered, “세게.” your face turned red at his words, “yoongi!” he let out a chuckle, “that’s what you’ll be saying later.” 

Originally posted by infiresfan

hoseok: hoseok had been cleaning the room when he came across a stack of papers haphazardly thrown on your desk. humming lightly, he flipped over the papers only to be met with big letter that read ‘korean alphabet’. hoseok’s eyes skidded over the paper as you, unknowingly to him, walked in the room. “hobi!” you yelled as you saw him looking at your paper, “don’t read those!” hoseok smiled sheepishly, “too late!” “it was supposed to be a gift!” you frowned. “you’re already a gift babe.” 

Originally posted by parkjiminer

namjoon: namjoon smiled brightly as he heard your voice through the closed door, “an… annyeo…” your pronunciation was terrible, but in no way was he going to tell you that. “annyeonghaseyo,” namjoon said with a smirk as he walked into the room. “hey!” you shouted as you pouted, crossing your arms, “i’m really trying here.” namjoon chuckled, “i know baby, you’re so cute.” a flush took over your face and neck as namjoon sat down next to you, helping you with your pronunciations. 

Originally posted by ciutae

jimin: “jiminnnnnnn,” you complained as you reached another hard problem on your korean worksheet. “yes babe?” jimin tried not to smile as you got increasingly more and more frustrated with the language. “why is korean so difficult.” jimin chuckled, “well i-.” you cut him off, “yes jimin, we know english is a dumb language that makes no sense but i just can’t figure this out!” jimin placed a light kiss on your cheek, “it’s okay babe, here, let me help.”

Originally posted by trash-for-bangtan

taehyung: “you have to start with writing the important things,” taehyung said as he took the pen from your hand writing ‘김태형’. you rolled your eyes, “your name isn’t on my list of need to know words, tae.” taehyung fake gasped, placing his hand over his heart. “i beg to differ,” he huffed, “but hey at least you can read it!” you laughed, “of course i know how to write your name taehyung, it was the first thing i learned.” “see i am important!”

Originally posted by kimtaehyung-gifs

jungkook: “why the hell is your name so hard to write,” was the first thing you said when jungkook walked through the door after practice. “well hello to you too,” jungkook chuckled at the frustrated look on your face, “here let me see.” you passed your paper shyly to jungkook who laughed at your awful writing. “don’t laugh!” jungkook took the pencil from your hand before writing down his name ‘전정국’. “fuck off you fluent piece of shit.”

Originally posted by parkjiminparkjimout

short, sweet, & to the point back to school tips

An anon recently asked for some back to school tips, so I thought I’d give a few for both high school and college.

For high school & college:

  • Need new stuff? Have you checked your backpack? Is it falling apart? Make sure your most basic needs are covered.
  • Be certain you have the right supplies for each class, such as a folder and a notebook for each.
  • Of course, make sure you have pencils, pens, paperclips, tape, post-it’s, index cards, and anything else you might need.
  • Prepare your workspace! Clean out your desk and make sure everything has a designated space. Clear away clutter. A cluttered desk makes for a cluttered mind.
  • Freshen your wardrobe! If you have the extra cash, use some to buy yourself new clothes and shoes. It’ll definitely get you in the back-to-school spirit.
  • Did you do your work for over the summer? Please do not wait until the last week/day/night to do this. Try to enjoy the rest of your break!
  • Do you have a reading list for the upcoming year/semester? If so and if you have the time, get a head start on your reading before you start getting busy.
  • Get a planner or a bullet journal! Set it up and fill out as much as you can: important dates, big projects, etc.
  • When picking a seat on the first day, sit at the front of the classroom. You’ll be free from distractions, be able to hear & see better, and more likely than not your questions will be answered.
  • Start organized, stay organized. Keep all your handouts in separate folders or binders. Use a color coded system: match your folder/binder to your notebook for a particular class.
  • Get on a good sleep schedule. Gradually start going to bed earlier and waking up earlier. It takes two weeks to establish a new sleep schedule.

For college:

  • Make sure you have everything you need to furnish your dorm or apartment!
  • Stock up on some healthy study snacks.
  • Look at a map of your campus and learn the routes you will have to take to get to your classes. You don’t want to be late on the first day!
  • Get your books early to err on the side of caution. Professors are very unsympathetic to, “I didn’t do my reading because I didn’t have the book.” Figure out how much you’ll use your books and/or if you can effectively share, and sell your books back as soon as you can.

Best of luck to everyone as you get ready to head back to school!

Curious about auras? This article will hopefully explain the specifics of this peculiar phenomenon.

What’s an aura, anyways?

The term aura refers to an individual’s subtle energetic emanations. Auras aren’t visible to everyone, but plenty of people see them. They appear as a sphere of light or color around the body. 

The color, size, brightness, and other features of the aura depend on the nature of the person it belongs to. These things can vary based on mood. They can also relate to metabolic factors, magical activity, and many other things.

Many New Age writers say that the aura is energy in the scientific sense. This is a common misconception. No physicist has ever measured anything resembling auras as they’re commonly understood.

A few days ago, someone told me that they believed the aura was a human’s magnetic field. This isn’t true. The magnetic field of a human doesn’t act like an aura. It doesn’t change based on emotions or other things like that.

Others say it is something electrical, or related to quantum mechanics. The truth of the matter is that science can’t (yet) measure the aura in any way. Many are skeptical about its existence for this reason.

Still, many, many people have seen auras throughout history. To me, it’s a real phenomenon. Science may not understand it yet, but, for me, it’s real!

The energy that extends beyond our physical bodies is called the aura. The word “aura” is derived from Latin aere, meaning “air” or “gentle breeze.” The American Heritage Dictionary defines the aura as “an invisible breath, emanation, or radiation.” In metaphysics, the aura is seen as the human energy field, that portion of the subtle body that radiates out beyond the limits of the physical body.

Belanger, Michelle  A.. The Psychic Energy Codex: Awakening Your Subtle Senses (p. 117). Red Wheel Weiser. Kindle Edition.

Some gifted people see auras without trying. Also, many children see auras in early childhood. Often, this ability, if not cultivated, disappears as they grow up. Many magicians and witches develop the ability to see auras.

This involves a great deal of practice and effort. It’s worthwhile, but everyone is different. Not everyone will have the same aptitude to see auras. Some people can see only a little bit of the aura, like a vague mist. Others see brighter colors and light.

Everyone’s aura is different, too! Most witches and psychics believe this extends only few feet from the body. Size can and does vary, though. Some people may have an aura of only several inches. 

Others might have a very large aura. Size, color, brightness, and other features change throughout a person’s life. If you see a person’s aura at one point, expect it to change within hours, if not minutes. This reflects how dynamic people can be.

Auras in History

People have observed and recorded auras throughout time. It appears in many pieces of religious and spiritual artwork. Historically, auras are usually shown emanating from the body of holy men and women.

Christian artists often depict them surrounding saints. They appear in other cultures, as well. Medieval authors referred to the light surround a person’s head as the “aureole”. They called light around the body the “nimbus.“ These authors called the whole aura the “glory.”

In Scrying for Beginners, Donald Tyson writes about the auras shape in artwork. While many modern seers refer to the aura as a sphere, the ancients saw it differently. They believed that saints emanated two spheres that overlapped.

The glory is sometimes depicted in religious art as the vesica or vesica piscis, a lens-shaped figure formed by the overlap of two equal circles that pass through each other at their centers. Christ, the Virgin Mary, and other saints are often painted within this pointed oval, which is also called a mandorla (from the Italian word for "almond”).

Donald Tyson. Scrying For Beginners (For Beginners (Llewellyn’s)) (p. 200). Llewellyn - A. Kindle Edition.

During the occult revival of the late 19th and early 20th century, many people wrote about the aura. Theosophists and other occultists developed complex systems for understanding it. 

Madame Blavatsky and Walter Kilner believed there were distinct layers to the aura. They named them and sought to understand them.

As science merged with occultism, seers began to look for ways to measure the aura. There have been plenty of attempts. None were particularly fruitful.

Of note is “Kirlian Photography.” Symon and Valentina Kirlian developed this practice in 1940s Russia. It involves sending an electrical current through the individual.

A photographic plate records the resulting discharge. Later scientists argued that the image was more mundane. They believed the interaction of this electric field and ambient moisture caused it.

Today, most people seem to agree with that sentiment. Kirlian images recorded don’t behave in a manner consistent with how seers perceive the aura. For example, Kirlian images rarely change based on state of mind.

Despite many attempts, science still doesn’t understand the aura! For that reason, most people relegate it to the realm of metaphysics and occultism. I don’t have a problem with that.

I am supportive of science, but acknowledge that not everything is currently known. As a witch, I do believe in magick, for example. Magick itself isn’t understood or measurable by science. The aura isn’t, but I still find the concept useful.

Seeing the Aura

Over time, it has been evident that people can develop aura sight. I myself saw auras occasionally as a child. I did not have further experiences with this until I began studying magick, though. I don’t consider myself to have natural aura vision.

Still, I see auras in certain circumstances these days. It’s something I practiced and developed. While not everyone can develop this ability, most people can! The level of detail you see will vary, but why not try?

Now, I’ll give you my own method for inducing aura vision. It may or may not work for you. I have read that many other people found these techniques helpful, though.

It is best to begin by looking for your own aura. Some people do begin by working with a partner, though. For me, aura vision comes best when I’m a bit sleepy. I don’t have the focus for it when I’m completely exhausted, but a little sleepiness works well.

I’ve found that auras are easiest to see in a dim environment without bright artificial lights. Natural light in the early morning or evening works best for me. While some folks say candlelight works, I find that the flickering distracts me.

Some herbs and incense can help with aura sight. Herbal blends designed for psychic enhancement have worked well for me in the past. 

My favorite herb for inducing aura vision is mugwort. It is good for other magical purposes, as well. Do some research and be careful if you decide to try it, of course. Not everyone reacts well to herbs.

Begin by focusing your vision on the edges of the body. This is regardless of whether you’re working by yourself or with someone else. 

With other people, I like to fix my vision above the top of the head. When looking for my own aura, I extend my hand flat and at an angle. Then, I gaze above my palm.

This is tricky, though. It takes a lot of practice. It works best for me if I look at the space  close to the body, and try to ignore the body itself. It’s difficult, though. We’re used to looking directly at objects, not the area around them.

I would suggest not wearing very bright clothing when attempting this. That can be distracting. It’s also good to do this against a blank, uncolored surface, like a white wall.

The aura will usually appear first as a light shimmering in the air. This may have a wispy mist-like appearance. It usually begins with a grayish color. Once you can see this, focus on it, and not the object.

When you can see the aura very close to the body, begin to glance around that area. After a time, you will be able to see a larger, more diffuse part.

Aura Colors

While many people can see auras, not everyone can see aura colors. This is especially true for beginners. For those that don’t see colors, the aura appears as that shifting, shimmering mist.

If color does appear in the aura, focus on the color. It may seem to grow brighter and brighter. Most seers agree that the colors correspond to the nature of the person at that specific time. 

Some books will list “color meanings” for the aura. My view is a bit different. Aura colors do have meaning, but, to me, a given color’s meaning depends on the seer.

If you associate yellow with happiness, seeing a yellow aura would show that the subject is happy. We don’t all process color the same way! We tend to absorb cultural associations for certain colors. Still, everyone has a different view. Keep this in mind when reading the aura!

Conclusion

I hope this article provides a good beginning for potential aura seers! Developing aura vision is fun and exciting. You can learn about a person (and how to connect with them!) by examining their aura.

It can also be helpful for witches and magicians. It’s a good first step to seeing all kinds of subtle forces. If you can see them, it’s easier to connect with them! Anyways, I hope you’re all having a great day. May your magick be glorious!

Creation Vs Consumption

Ok, so, artist struggling with depression here. I just slept for like 2 days straight and I can barely hold a pencil right now and everything I draw looks like shit and nothing I make feels like it matters.

Most of us have been there. It’s painful.

Especially when you eat, breathe, -live- art, and you can’t create anything. There’s a pressure to always be creating, always drawing, always posting. But sometimes, you just can’t. Sometimes your heart just isn’t in it, or you don’t have the energy, or you’re distracted by things that happened in the day that upset you. And I know when I tell you “That’s okay” you may not believe me, because hell, I don’t always even believe myself.

But here’s something of a life hack I learned that I desperately need to practice more myself:

If you can’t create, consume.

Watch a movie. Read a webcomic. Catch up on your favorite cartoon. Do it for days. Do it for weeks. However long it takes. Indulge in the thing that makes you love drawing in the first place. Your inspiration is living in there somewhere, and immersing yourself in your interests when you’re down is self care.

Not productive enough? Need something that feels more worth while and less leisurely? Study. Google tutorials on drawing that anatomy you’re struggling with. Look up walk throughs on how to use watercolor in a way you haven’t tried. Watch youtube videos of other artists drawing or demonstrating techniques you don’t know and figure out how they do the thing. You’re a student and you’re studying, so it’s Mature and Productive and counts as Work, BUT it takes far fewer spoons than actually creating art if you just don’t have it in you.

Conclusion: you don’t always have to be creating content to be advancing as an artist.

This is for my nervous witchlings.

It’s okay to stutter, to look at the descriptions. It’s alright if you have to look up the meaning of this tarot card or that herb. It’s normal to trip over the words of your first long incantation or just your own feet while dancing.

I just have this bad feeling that so many baby witches are embarrassed about the way their first spells and potions go.

So many seem to lose the courage to do their Craft because they can’t get the spells to sound beautiful or because they think they are to clumsy to do this ritual.

Let me tell you something.

Everything comes with time.
The practice, the knowledge, the intuition, the grace.

Oh dear ones especially the Grace! It’s all patience.

Like learning a new recipe, at first it’s just chaos: you and a sizable portion of the kitchen are covered in flour. Nothing seems to work the first time you try it. You’re trying to hold the recipe steady with your elbow so you can read how many eggs you need again and how mutch salt goes WHere!? It’s awful and the results are mediocre at best.

But each time you try again, dare again, you get better. Until one day the recipe is just a distant reminder and everything you do is muscle memory.

We know what this kind of grace looks like from watching our grandmothers cook or knit. From watching our sisters braid hair and our mothers dance.

It’s beautiful and it’s born entirely from patience and practice.

So don’t worry about your failures. Really I mean it, please don’t. As long as you learn from them they were worth making. So go out there and dare to fail, to fall, to have flaws.

And take this to heart: “If you stumble make it part of your dance.”

Your J. S. Morrigan

We are really underestimating aliens

I feel like it should be mentioned that it takes some pretty damn advanced and tough life to evolve enough to achieve interstellar travel. What if humans are the last intelligent life to accomplish it in this galaxy because we spent so much time arguing amongst one another?

We assume aliens are super impressed by how horrifying and rough Earth can be, but we have a lot of needs. We might be versatile for Earth, but space?

The temperature, atmosphere, food types, and even gravity are all unique to earth and vital to our success. If we even change pressures too quickly, our blood foams and can kill us. Anywhere besides earth and we would be hugely disadvantaged!

Neptune rains diamonds. Venus’s atmospheric pressure would squash us flat. Jupiter’s winds would shred us to bits in 5 seconds flat. Uranus’ magnetic field would open once, let in a little radiation, and dammit our skin melted again.

I’d have to guess that any alien life form intelligent enough to speak has outcompeted everything else on its planet like we have ours, and that doesn’t come from being weak. We got lucky because we were just smart enough to make weapons.

These aliens gotta be the biggest, baddest motherfuckers in the Milky Way. Keep in mind, they’re smart too. It’s much more likely they would laugh us out of the intergalactic space station.

We’ve also been describing aliens as lacking creativity and empathy, but that’s what technology comes from. Creative creatures. What if these aliens are even more creative and capable? “Human Jim, you really only see from 670 - 440 wavelengths of light? You must be missing out. I can see ultraviolet through infrared.” What if our senses are dull compared to theirs, and that’s why we’re so far behind?

Our only saving grace at that point is our ability to mimic and learn new things. After all, that’s how we started. We saw other animals do the thing and then we did it too.

Aliens might be brainy and brawny, but the humans are good copycats. Don’t let them hear you speak your native tongue, as they will learn it. Don’t let them see you assemble a plasma base because they will immediately adopt it and modify it for their own needs. In combat, we’re not fearsome at first. But, we can see your fighting style and find weaknesses rather quickly in the heat of battle. God forbid you meet a social butterfly. Some humans can read body language and mimic it in order to make you like them.

Maybe our next biggest advantage is how nimble our fingers are, and how dextrous our two track brain is. What if aliens can’t play piano because that requires two hands to do different things? What about reflexes? Emotional reflexes? In the time the Ritaliroans decided the best course of action, the humans amygdala went insane and already did the thing anyways.

Just a lot of thoughts that I’ve had about this. Especially opposable thumbs. Aliens with tentacles might find it much harder to build microchips than we do.

anonymous asked:

I'm really interested in learning Japanese but I'm not really sure where to start with it.

It’s amazing how someone can teach themselves a whole new language by themselves. I self-studied Japanese and never used a textbook. There are so many resources for learning, online and free. You can learn just using the online or free resources listed here and beyond. But where do you start?


First, start with hiragana. There are many ways to learn it.

videos:

Next, learn Katakana

videos:

Next understand more about hiragana like long vowel sounds, muddied sounds, The Small や、ゆ、and よ, the small つ、the long vowel sound with Tae Kim.

Then more with katakana. Learn the long vowel sound and the small ア イ ウ エ オ with Tae Kim again.

Then additional sounds using whatever method helped you learn hiragana and katakana.

Done with all that?  Now, drop romaji. It’s dead to you. A little reluctant? Practice more.

Learn grammar next with vocab and kanji on the side. It’s hard to learn grammar without vocab and it’s hard to learn words without understanding some kanji. I know it’s tough but once you ride it out through grammar learning Japanese becomes much smoother and easier. It’s not as frustrating. It’s so fun.

Grammar

Vocab

  • memrise
  • JLPT N5 vocab list ( recommend learning other JLPT vocab later too)
  • learn the words in the grammar lessons too!
  • Write down new vocab you come across and make flash cards or quizlets to learn them

kanji

Dictionaries

Dictionaries are helpful for vocab and kanji.

  • imiwa?
  • jisho
  • Japanese ( This is my main dictionary)
  • Download Japanese dictionary and Japanese-English dictionary on iPhone in settings, go to dictionary on settings

After all that just keep practicing. Go to your best free resource, your public library and find books in your level, watch videos in Japanese, read manga, watch a film in Japanese etc. 

Also, here’s a good masterpost that also lists other good masterposts and more.

Here’s some miscellaneous advice I want to give beforehand I really hope you'll take:

  • Try using the Japanese dictionary the most, not the Japanese-English one but the completely in Japanese definitions of words one. Use Japanese-English when you can’t understand the Japanese definition to help yourself. I found English words given to define Japanese words seem to be similar words or/and words the Japanese word is usually translated in. It’s hard to really understand the word exactly. To really understand the word I find myself having to read the Japanese definitions. This is literally what I give the most credit for my progress in Japanese. ( some good ones are kotobank and goo辞書 as well as the iPhone one.)
  • Learn loan words. Sometimes they aren’t used like the language it originally came from uses it.
  • Understand what radicals are so you use them to look up kanji. Lots of Japanese dictionaries let you look up by radical.
  • Practice stroke order. I mean my handwriting is messy but a least it’s legible and not as messy as it could be.
  • learn Dialects!
  • Some words use a couple different kanjis. Learn the nuances of using those different kanjis in the word.
  • Read news in Japanese
  • learn the culture. It’s impossible to learn Japanese without understanding the culture.
  • learn kanji by learning how its used and vocab. Here’s a post I made about that. It’s the same one above.
  • Change your phone into Japanese.
  • follow Japanese people’s accounts on social media, whether that’s here on Tumblr, Twitter or Instagram.
  • And lastly, Don’t lose yourself to discouragement. Keep going. I can’t tell you how good it felt to watch Jdrama completely in Japanese or read a whole adult novel in Japanese. I could see anyone getting there too. It takes time but it’s very possible.

Followers, feel free to recommend any resource in the notes:)


がんばって!

Have you guys ever seen that post about how the way parents talk to their children becomes their inner voice?

That means that sometimes Zen looks at the mirror and all he remembers are his mom’s harsh words telling him he’s ugly, scolding him for not being as obedient as his brother.

That means that sometimes before he sends a picture of himself into the chat he probably hesitates, because he’s not sure if he really does look good in it. His narcissism is all just a façade to hide the fact that he’s actually so insecure inside.

That means that when you start living with him there will probably be days when he just feels absolutely disgusting, and all he does is avoid mirrors, work out almost to the point of overexertion, and you have to stop him and just assure him that he is alright the way he is.

You’ll start to wonder if the reason why he heals so quickly is because his body’s so used to it.

You’ll start to wonder what it was like before you came along. On good days he would be sweet and loving, but on the bad days he wouldn’t even want to look at you because he doesn’t feel like he deserves to. Because he’s ugly. Because you deserve better.

You’re there with him through thick and thin because you love him, and each day you just have to remind him that you love him and that both of you deserve each other.

One day he’ll learn to love himself, you tell yourself. And so you stay, because in the first place, you have no reason to leave. You’ve got a perfect man. His insecurities don’t change that. He just has to see himself as how you see him.


Just a mini-fic before I go to bed!

I’d like to dedicate this to @zens-ponytail because she inspired me with her previous post here.

If this post actually blows up I’ll do one for the rest of the RFA members + V + Saeran since this was actually really fun to make.

Thanks for reading!


UPDATE: YOOSUNG X MC MINI-FIC

2

A/N: Part II of this Imagine. I also put a request from @dreamwalker08 in there. It just worked together perfectly. Enjoy!

Words: 1958
Warnings: violence, smut (on the battlefield)

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Astrology Milestones

Age 12 - First Jupiter Return: The ancients celebrated puberty because the biological God and Goddess of creation had been awakened and it was a sacred time in one’s life. This was recognised with jubilance and honour. Jupiter rules hormones and cultural conditioning. In modern times we shame and denigrate the phase, remarking on hormonal changes that inconvenience society, and yet we wonder why teenagers self destruct, rebel, and turn to substance. This changing biology transforms the lower body and activates the spirit, and yet we are not prepared or nurtured for this powerful change. 

Age 14 - Jupiter opposes Saturn: The resistance to authority and conditioning is activated here, along with self consciousness and the lure into danger. This is the moment a young person can typically choose between ‘indulgence, laziness, and self pleasure’ (Jupiter) in leaving school or ‘responsibility, expectation, and conforming to authority’ (Saturn) in remaining in school or focusing on the future. The karmic lesson is revealed around this period. We face intimidating figures of authority, often threatening with ‘what until you’re in the real world’ shaking confidence even more 

Age 21 - Uranus squares natal Uranus: 21 is the age globally recognised as completed transition into adulthood. This period indicates self expression and experimentation, a time for tattoos and lilac hair and inspiration. It’s a favourable time for sparking people’s interest in astrology. Political activity, protest, and rebellion can begin around here. Cosmically, this is a time where people learn a lot about themselves and generate good self awareness, they start to feel wholly in their body, or as if fogginess has dissolved 

Age 28-30 - First Saturn Return: Everything you have built until this point is under threat. Saturn writes his first report card, and it will rely on how intimate and satisfactory you have been in facilitating Saturn’s condition in the natal chart. This is the biggest overhaul we experience on a physical/mental level, when the anchor of the chart completes transit and writes a new criteria. We are given 29 years because the reading material and substance is so profound. Harsh reality hits with shattering force. It’s time to become an adult. 

-C.

A. Claire’s Identity....REVEALED???

No. Well, probably not. But I think I have a pretty decent guess? 

My Jude post is going to take a little while longer, and once I put these pieces together it didn’t take much to make things fall into place, and turned out to be pretty quick to put together.

I don’t usually do outright speculation, I tend to dislike doing so. But this feels solid enough that I’m willing to at least mention it, and more than that its simply interesting to think about, so while we wait for Hiveswap: Act 2, I figure we may as well mull over this possibility.

So, humor me.

A. Claire is a pretty mysterious figure. She seems to come out of nowhere to shake up Homestuck’s core cast, and she seems to know more about the game than we ever confirmed for any other Guardian, barring Pa himself. 
Why does she seem so connected to the Cherub Key? How on earth did she paint a mural of the green sun??? What’s her deal! 

There’s no precedent for a character quite like the mysterious actress, and seemingly no background profile that would explain how she knows what she knows. Except, of course, for the obvious one. The one we’ve overlooked. 

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