you get more character that way

2

COMMISSIONS ARE OPEN AGAIN!!

(lower prices second time around, and updated rules!)

  • i will not draw gore. 
  • i will draw nsfw but depending on the request.
  • i won’t draw furries/anthro, sorry!
  • abusive themes/whitewashing are a no.
  • payment up front please, and upon contact and agreement on a piece i will give you my paypal information.
  • want more characters? price is negotiable, let’s talk!
  • (and yes if you want fullbody you will get fullbody down to the feet on flats/lines, i just used that picture as an example.)

throughout the process i will keep you updated with screenshots if you would like, just to make sure it’s coming along the way you want it to! feel free to suggest any edits to the art if it’s not the way you pictured/want it. if you’re interested in a commission, you can message me on this blog, or email me @ spacekidnebula@gmail.com !

nenekobasu  asked:

hi! would you recommend the vampire chronicles to someone who doesn't read much vampire stuff? i'm trying to figure out if i should get into it or not

Oh wow, that is a tall order for me to try and make a call on. You’re putting a lot of trust in the Local Salt Miner.

That said… well, I have to admit that your question makes sense. Despite being hugely attracted to horror in general, I was never a reader of Christopher Pike or Charlaine Harris. I tolerated the Anita Blake series for way too long, but that was less about the vampires and much more about the hurrr hurr look at all the sex these characters are having that I’m not. Similarly, when I read Poppy Z. Brite, I was most interested in his use of transgression, rather than in vampirism itself. So yeah, liking or being entertained by one work that exists within a genre doesn’t mean liking the whole genre, nor vice versa.

So to begin with, I would ask–what makes you suspect that you might like these books? People tend to have pretty intense, personal, emotional reactions, for better or worse; it’s certainly the case with all the fans I know, but we mostly all started reading the series at formative points in our young lives. It was, when I was growing up, one of those books that contained things your mother probably wouldn’t want you reading, but also didn’t LOOK like anything she needed to check over or veto.

(The first book, Interview With The Vampire, still lived in a hole in my mattress for a good many years because it felt so private and intense, and also because one of my mother’s favorite ways to punish me was to throw away books from my shelves.)

For me, the things that work are pretty much confined to the first three volumes, which form a fairly coherent and confined trilogy. Those are the three out of 14 that I actually recommend; reading past that is partly masochism on my part.

Some selling points, mixed in with negatives:

They’re very sensual horror, handling erotic themes though USUALLY not porn, with genital content taking a backseat to emotional and tactile stuff (TVA is, ahem, a big swollen exception). The language tends to be very purple and drenched in sensory descriptions, alluring in style and intent even when describing things which are repulsive; much of the horror comes from being placed inside the perspectives of these beings that feel so similarly to how we do, but are attracted even to disgusting things. (This can be a trial, like when Anne sees fit to take multiple sentences to describe a vampire’s hand on a literal dead child’s chest complete with nipple touching.)

Originally posted by gif-007

Also, for many readers including myself, it was a real experience just finding works with sympathetic queer characters in them whos queerness was unambiguously present and vital to their journeys, but which also fell into the realm of genre works with plots exploring more than simply Woe I am Gay, What a Trial. (OTOH, at its worst it becomes a pretty fetishistic depiction of Thin White Gay Men with Seme/Uke dynamics by a rich white straight misogynist lady drowning in privilege and forgetting fairly basic things which should impact the characters so.)

The same goes for the characters’ psyches. The vampires here all suffer from vagaries of thought which can be read as relatable for people with mental illnesses and survivors of almost any kind of trauma (TWs up and down the books for same). For me, Louis is the character with whom I connect the most, because of IWTV’s in-depth depiction of his existence as a depressed person on an impossibly attenuated timeline, struggling through the work of DECIDING to live night by night and year by year while also navigating often-toxic relationships with others. It’s a tiring, sad story, but Louis (before Anne decides she doesn’t like him any more) is a recognizable person to me.

Still, it was the chance to identify with something alluring and monstrous, powerful and damaged. The early books explored types of strength and weakness, and centered often on the importance of even transitory pleasures as an aid to continued perseverance in a world more and less hostile than it should be. Their treatments of morality are flawed, but the characters’ work in navigating those questions is involving and endearing.

Plus I just adore the characters. Louis de Pointe du Lac, intellectual, romantic, sensitive and cynical gay nihilist who Wants To Believe; Daniel Molloy, brokenhearted hope-filled former radio interviewer who picked up a vampire in bar in San Fran called the Pink Baby and then spent a decade clubbing himself to death before finally arriving at immortality; Claudia, a woman whose body will never match her mind or her desires or her impulses, vicious and cold and needful and brutal; Armand, victim of a thousand traumas, cloaked in strength and ritual to draw in people to keep him oriented; Lestat, who used to be a sweet rebellious free-spirited boy, cruel and thoughtless and desperate to hold onto something.

(He’s not that anymore, but. First three books.)

If you’re not sure about reading them, I’d seriously suggest giving the Neil Jordan Interview With The Vampire film from 1994 a go; it’s not a perfect adaptation by any means, but it has the tone and the storyline mostly intact, and honestly the production values alone are worth the sit. Cruise and Dunst are perfection, Banderas performs excellently despite being the diametric opposite of “physically suited” for his role, and Christian Slater seems to be having a good time. (Pitt is sadly both the lead and the weak point.)

It’s a two-hour investment of time that literally changed my life, 20+ years ago, and while it may not change yours, I do hope you enjoy it!

Good points of Pokemon X and Y

Because i feel these get too much hate

Vivillon: I love the idea behind it and how it encourages getting together with people in order to get different forms

PSS: no comments needed

Character Customization: it may still be flawed, but it’s the very first main series game to ever offer this

Berry fields: Honestly the best way the berry fields ever were handled imo

Many ways to easily get money

Super Training: On par with the pelago island imo the best ev grind option so far

Skates: Hands down. I love skating a lot, and having a more interesting option besides the bike is really nice

Sitting: The only mainseries game where you can sit. Still surprised they removed that in Su/Mo

This is just something i quickly thought up, so yeh i feel like there are things i may have overlooked. Feel free to add.

Also i didn’t say the pokemon designs in general as opinions vary a lot here, and even i don’t like all designs.

CR Binge: Desperate Measures

Matthew Mercer is not a benevolent god.

What an episode. You’d think being attacked by an ancient white dragon would be the most intense thing, but nope, that would be the whole scene in the basement. Roll initiative should never have to be said when only your own party is present! Travis was amazing – we’re really getting to see more of his RP chops in these last few episodes. Grog and Percy being at odds over the skull, each of them refusing to be entirely forthcoming even when the rest of their party is like WTF WTF WTF at them, was so intense because you literally have no idea if you can trust either of them. The perils of neutral characters, man.

And then the last part of the episode was mostly Matt talking, I guess? But it didn’t feel that way, both because he paints such pictures and because of the reactions of everyone else. The twins realizing that Thordak is the one who killed their mother. Keyleth being terrified for her people. All of them trying to figure out how much of this is their fault. I teared up a couple of times, especially when Matt described the destruction of the fire ashari.

Next episode: In Ruins, when we hopefully find out who of the relevant NPCs are still breathing. Somehow I doubt Matt will skimp on the vivid descriptions of their beautiful city in flames…

anonymous asked:

Which character is the most fun to write? Which character do you have the most difficulty writing?

Hands down, Mairon is the best character to write. He’s evil, yes, so that’s good fun, but I try to make him a bit more than just ‘ahhhh your nondescript typical evil villain’. I give him some complexity, he has emotions and doubts and ambitions, which can be a lot of fun to explore. And on top of all of that, he can be downright nasty. Melkor is evil in a kind of remote, overarching way, a more conventional way. Mairon can be evil in that insidious little way that gets inside of people’s heads and really messes with them. I think the most fun I’ve ever had writing a character was Mairon in ‘Sins of our Fathers’ when at the end he truly got to be his villainous self and ohhhhhh it was glorious :D 

What character do I have the most difficulty writing? Tricky question, as I only tend to write about the characters that I am interested in, and if I’m interested in them then I probably have a quite clear view of them in my mind. Melkor can be a bit of a challenge, just to get the nuances of him right, and Maedhros can be a challenge at the moment within ‘An Evil Cradling’, as trying to get the balance of emotions right (and to not be repetitive) is tricky. Mainly though I think I’d struggle with characters that I have less interest in, say Maeglin, or Manwë, or Thingol. Hence I don’t tend to write about them!   

projecting? probably, but hear me out

General Keith meta I guess. This is very long, but good writing ref for all you fellow fic authors.

Keith is a very sensitive guy.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Sumire and Hinata are similar in a couple of ways, but they're different overall. Sumire is more outgoing, if a bit anxious and fidgety. In contrast, Hinata was shy and meeker and always seemed to keep to herself at that age. People are just upset that SP created a character that's slightly similar and possibly based on a pre-existing character who happens to be one of the more popular ones. Fans like the characters; get over it you petulant and entitled folks.

I don’t find them similar ,  i don’t know why everytime she appears on screen they bash hinata but when they see a shy boy they praise him :3

this fandom

hollywoodreporter.com
'Sense8' Cast on Why Their Inclusive Show Is "Necessary" in Trump's America
The global group praised the Netflix series for its "poignant" timing at the second season premiere.

The timing of this season is particularly poignant,” Tina Desai — who plays love-torn Indian pharmacist Kala from Mumbai — told THR. “This is something we’ve experienced as people, not just as characters, that when you actually make the attempt to get to know who someone is, we’re all the same.”

She continued, “We might be culturally different, but we all think and feel the same way. If we can just respect that difference and then get over it and be more accepting, there really isn’t any problem. The problem comes around when you resist change. That’s what the show is doing: We all get past our differences and create something really amazing.”

Her on-screen love interest, Max Riemelt — who plays German thief Wolfgang — agreed with the timely message.

“We don’t like to use labels,” he told THR. “People like to understand and categorize things in order to understand. The show gives people a hope or the possibility to see things differently and also to identify and cope with people they thought might not exist. That is the power of this show.”

* Spoiler Alert*

Case in point: In the premiere episode when Lito and Capheus are being interviewed on opposite sides of the world and are each tasked with answering, “Who am I?” The question invokes all the Sensates to chime in with a unifying, interconnected answer.

“That was written a year before Trump’s election,” said Silvestre. “I completely believe the worst can bring the best of a human being and in that scene, it’s pretty clear when eight people from eight different parts of the world gather together, you can expect the best from them. The result is always better than when it comes from only one culture.”

ta-dala  asked:

Pass the happy along! When you get this, reply with 5 things that make you happy and then send it to the last 10 people in your activity!

I’m going to keep this fandom focused.

1. The way shipping launches endorphins into my brain that make me feel like I am falling in love for the first time.
2. The way Cassian Andor has no chill around Jyn Erso.
3. More Spasians in Star Wars! Represent!
4. Diego Luna’s dumb face.
5. Messy, angry, complicated women characters like Jyn Erso and Mara Jade, and fighting misogyny and patriarchy via them one meta post at a time with my fellow thoughtful, intelligent fans!

anonymous asked:

Allura and Coran in an Amish village

NEVER LET CORAN DRIVE

“coran, are you sure this is the right way? i don’t think we are anywhere NEAR new york city and i don’t even know if i’m overdressed or under dressed here.” allura complained as looked around the small town to find a map.

“we are getting close, i can feel it in my quinklehoppers!” coran announced as he found a map, “in fact we are only…. 171 miles away!”

“CORAN. NEXT TIME WE USE GPS.”

ask me for terribly written 3 sentence fan fic by leaving two (or more) voltron characters + a location either from voltron or real life in my ask

anonymous asked:

Choi Seunghyun for the 3-5 things you think about when you write about people?

Instability - Building an unpredictability around him and his actions caused by his instability. The rawness his character brings with negative emotions, the gut wrenching sadness of feeling the low lows, but that insanely high, off the charts eccentric and almost child like bizzare he gets when things are going good. But it’s more than the swings. It’s the inability for anyone to know which way he is going to swing, and the tenseness that often comes with that.

Luxeness - Not richness, not expensive taste, but the search for the finest quality life can afford him. When I write for him, details about what surrounds him build an important part of his character and making him believable. Cashmere suits and silk ties, fine quality red wine, wagyu beef topped with truffle white wine jus… It’s not an image he is creating, but his thirst for all things quality.

Uniqueness - This one is difficult to explain. But, he has such a decidedly ‘T.O.P’ way of interacting with people, places and things that makes writing his character so difficult. I don’t know how to explain it, but anyone that has tried to write for him will probably know exactly what I am trying to say here.

Honorable mentions: Chairs, art galleries, emotional coldness followed by intense loyalty, a jacked sense of humour and the kind of sex that is fast, hard and going to leave you with bruises on your wrists for a good week.

Originally posted by cheonjaes

Character Writing Meme

writing an autistic character when you are not autistic - a masterpost

completely double spaced version on google docs here – this post is more blocky for the sake of people’s dashboards, but still long so people will be less likely to glaze over it. my apologies if that makes it hard to read

things to look for and avoid in an autistic character

• symptoms only manifesting as “nonverbal and rocking”
• super smart / living calculator
• super dumb / doesn’t understand anything
• all the symptoms you can come up with for them are “awkward” and “has special interest(s)” (please do more research)
• trains, technology, and/or math as special interests
• acting like a child
• getting treated like a baby
• unreasonably cruel and uncaring about others’ reactions to them being cruel
• if they’re comparable to sheldon from the big bang theory, start over
• animal comparisons
• a lack of feelings
• please no stories about what it’s like to be autistic told by allistics

the right way to write an autistic person

• lots of symptoms, including secondary ones not included on a general diagnosis requirement list (here’s a list i rather like that was made by an autistic person – their blog is also a good resource)
• having a good amount of general knowledge and actually talking about it (i cannot believe that i have to say this)
• talking about things outside of special interests (again…. come on……….) (special interests are usually the default things our brains go to when theres no stimulation or we want to entertain ourselves – it isn’t literally all we think or talk about ever. if a conversation has no connections to a special interest, reconsider having your autistic character bring it up in a context that is not an introduction.)
• explicitly expressed to be capable of attraction and romantic feelings – if your character is an adult, add sexual feelings to this point
• capable of general functioning, just with a disability that makes it more difficult – not a walking disability (….sigh)
• a wide amount of feelings and emotional turmoil (but perhaps only being able to express it in limited ways)
• we’re people
• just people whose brains are wired differently

things to avoid in research for an autistic character

• autism moms / autism blogs and websites not run by autistic people
• any affiliation with autism $peaks means you should walk away and never look back
• a scientist trying to create explanations for what autistic people do without actually asking / not mentioning asking autistic people
• anything about a cure for autism
• a person that “worked with autistic kids” phrased in the same way as “worked with animals”
• talking about autistic people as if they are mysteries, are like animals, or are otherwise othered weirdos instead of people

things to look for in research for an autistic character

• actual autistic people talking about their experiences and symptoms
• just stick to that and you’re good but it’s hard to find sometimes ngl. just look for the above red flags

things i would personally like to see in an autistic character

• less easy to swallow sadness and more destructive anger. i would love to see a canonically autistic character who was frustrated easily by small things and had trouble communicating why
• not a story about being autistic, a story that happens to have a character or characters who are autistic – it isn’t pointed out or questioned, they’re right at home with the rest of the cast and not othered (a la symmetra from overwatch)
• intensive sensory issues / small sounds making large reactions
• clear communications about not liking x sensory thing (for example being touched)
• poor motor skills / clumsiness and not being laughed at for it
• walking funny (body bent downwards, walking very fast, walking slowly, big strides, shuffling, stiffness, etc)  – no one treats it as if it’s funny or something totally strange
• a big personality that has a presence so they can’t be cast aside (but feel free to have quiet characters too) – if this was along with being nonverbal they would probably leap to being one of my favorite characters ever
• a fear of asking for clarification on sarcasm or jokes because of past experiences and an arc about the character becoming more comfortable asking questions

>> if any fellow autistic people want to add something, feel free <<

allistics are encouraged to rb this

Great lines from Pokemon main series games:

  • “It’s a switch. Press it?” [Yes] “Who wouldn’t?”
  • “You daft codger, your mask’s absurd!”
  • “This is bad! Badbadbadbadbadbadbad! Bad for Team Plasma! Or Plasbad for short!”
  • “Judge an Egg?! That’s a tall order even for me!” 
  • “The train hasn’t come in… I know! I’ll carry the passengers on my back! That won’t work.” 
  • “The way it works is blah blah… radioactive energy blah blah… blah blah blah infrared technology… blah blah blah…” 
  • [Name] paid an outrageous ¥500 and bought the Magikarp… 
  • “I am at this hotel now.”
  • “I’m the Team Skull boss, and I’ve never been scared of nothing or nobody. Heck, I live my life making people scared of ME! So listen to what big bad Guzma has to say… Y'all are stupid!”
  • “I CAN’T STOP SHOUTING! I THINK I’LL FREEZE IF I DO!”
  • “Today’s smell check of our beds is done! They’re fine. They smell good.”
  • “You dim-witted…dense…dumb…daft…dippy…dorky…doltish DOOFUS!!!“
  • DDDDDDDDDDOOOOOOOOOOOMMMMMMMMM!
  • “Whoops, dropped my balls.”
  • “Verily has it been our most treasured possession, since I happened to pick it up in a shop a week ago. Or two weeks, mayhap!” 
  • “I need to find a way to get more into the character of a Pokémon… maybe I should get the Day Care to raise me?” 
  • “My Hiker friend was so pleased by your right answer that he simply had to battle you! Come, my fine Hiker!”
  • “This pretty Pokemon looks just like me when I was younger. Right when I said that, my husband spewed the coffee he was drinking. Did I say something funny?” 
  • “You compare ME, Tabitha, the next Chief Admin of Team Magma, to a Makuhita?! You’d better at least make it a Hariyama!”
  • “Truly marvelous! And also a bridge!”
  • “I’m not stuck! It’s just that a pleasantly cool breeze drifts through here.”
  • “Lighthouse Point: The point that has a lighthouse.” 
Why all of the Disney princesses are awesome

Snow White

- was a survivor of attempted murder, and was resilient to not let that horrid and traumatizing event bring her down or let it ruin her life

- was a victim of emotional abuse, and didn’t let the abuse get to her

- would save a baby bird from danger and make sure it found it’s parents

- knows how to hold a rocking party with friends

Cinderella

- survivor of emotional abuse from her stepmom and stepsisters for many years, and stayed kind towards others

- despite her family treating her so wrongly and poorly, she just wanted to spend a night with them and have fun with them, and just be like a normal family “ Prince Charming, who “ ?????

- she’s sassy as fuck “ Well I don’t want to interrupt their “music lesson “ during her stepsisters bad singing

- even though she had a short time to be at the ball, she was grateful for the opportunity anyways

Aurora

- Gives up her happiness, to perform her duty as a princess for her kingdom and her kingdom’s future and knows that she must do her job as a princess. That’s pretty brave and selfless.

- that gorgeous blonde curly hair !!!!

Ariel

- she’s the first Princess that goes forward to make her dreams come true, rather than just wishing, hoping and waiting.

- she’s adventurous, curious, loves to explore, learn about new things and new cultures and new world

- she’s the first Princess to save her love interest, but once, but twice

Belle

- different, odd and a misfit from the common crowd and gives no fucks

- “ Women shouldn’t read “ Well shut the fuck up, I’m going to do what I love and enjoy anyways.

- takes no bullshit. You are a asshole ? Got no time for that. She’s outtie.

- sees the good within people, but is also isn’t naive, she knows that some people are just plain monsters, through and through.

Jasmine

- will stand up for her rights, and won’t be pushed around

- is quick, sharp, intelligent and a fast learner

-wants to learn more about the outside world and her people

-if you try and lie to her or manipulate her or treat her like she’s a fool, she’s not having that shit

Pocahontas

-will fight for her people, her family, her world, her home, her culture

- she’s the first princess to save the day, not the guy, not a male sidekick, she’s the one the saves the day, while Snow had the Dwarfs, Cinderella had her mice friends, Aurora had Prince Phillip, Ariel had Eric, and Jasmine had Aladdin. ( Belle is debatable imo )

- loves the earth and nature and will protect it from harm

Mulan

- she saves China, I mean, come on

- she never gives up, no matter what. If she fails, she will just try even harder to succeed and will find a way on how can succeed.

- brave, determined, strong mentally and physically, a kind friend

-teaches girls that it’s okay if you haven’t found yourself yet- if you don’t give up, one day you will, and you will conquer

- pushes gender norms

- another female princess that saves the day, not her male love interest, or sidekicks, is also the first princess to defeat the villian in battle, like a previous male character like Phillip or Eric would

Tiana

- is hard-working, and never gives up on her dreams, and will work hard to get there

- teaches that dreams are done by sweating your butt off, giving up on fun sometimes, sometimes having to work more than one job, than just wishing and hoping, you have to take action, and make that dream happen

-ambitious and smart and realistic

- teaches that you shouldn’t take a short-cut, find a lazy option, cheat or gamble your way to success, the only to get there is through hard work and effort

- again,another badass princess that saves the day on her own

Rapunzel

- is kind to everybody

- is cheerful, positive, warm and supportive towards others, even people who seem “scary “, she knows inside, that we all have dreams

-is brave enough to step outside her  zone and new and strange places and territories

- anger her by harming one of her loved ones and she will fucking tear you apart

- a talented artist

Anna and Elsa

- teaches girls that family love is just as important than romance love, if not more so

- Anna goes through a abusive relationship and isn’t put off love forever, she learns her lesson, doesn’t let Hans bad treatment of her ruin her or let her become a toxic person, like he was, and moves on with a better man, and a healthier relationship

- Elsa goes through basically being locked up with lack of other human contact, fearing her powers and fearing what other people think of, to come out as better and stronger person

- Elsa teaches that sometimes its best not let what others think of you, and just say “ fuck it “ and just be yourself and be free

- Anna teaches the difference between a unhealthy relationship (whirlwind romance,quickly trusting people, getting into a deep relationship with somebody you don’t even know )  and healthy one ( somebody who gives you his jacket when you are cold, holds you close when you are scared, is worried about your well-being, getting to know somebody first before leaping in, somebody who asks for your consent before kissing you, will do anything to make sure you are safe and okay )

Moana

- will do anything for her island and people and make sure they’ll all okay

- her leadership skills are A++

- no “ you are forced to marry this boy so you can become his queen”, BS, Moana is the future leader

- is brave to fear the unknown waters, learn new skills, and battle monsters

- is understanding, and understands why somebody acts the way that they do

- is extremely independent


in short, they are all awesome, even the three originals.

The 8 Steps of a CHARACTER ARC

You know that moment as a writer, when you’ve been charging through the story, high on how fantastic it is, and then suddenly…it all STOPS.  The next scene doesn’t form in your head. You’ve got nothing. 

Behind your characters, a string of bright and captivating scenes mark the trail of that rocket of inspiration; ahead of your characters, a foggy expanse, stretching to who-knows-where, a few shapeless blobs that should be scenes floating in the nothingness. The rocket is dead, and not refueling any time soon.

Well, to everybody who’s suffered this, or is currently suffering it, there’s a way to navigate through that fog. A map. Directions and a destination.

Or, more specifically, events that form the underlying structure of the story. 

This post is going to focus on one facet of story structure: character arc. Structure is something people subconsciously recognize and expect, and if the story doesn’t match those expectations, they feel cheated (though usually can’t explain why). Every good story follows a structure. So if you know structure, you’ll always know where to go next, and won’t get lost in the fog. 

So here are the 8 steps of a character arc:

1) Hero: Strength, Weakness, and Need

This happens in the setup of the story, when the main character’s ordinary world is being introduced. First, the main character’s strengths must be displayed; we must be given a reason to like them, or if not exactly “like” them, empathize with them, and be fascinated by them. The reader needs to bond with the character, feel concerned about how it all turns out for them. Or in other words, feel that the main character is worth experiencing the story. There are easy traits that do this: courage, love, humor, being in danger, being unfairly treated, being highly skilled at something, having a powerful noble goal. (Courage is the one they all need. If the character doesn’t have the gumption to actively pursue what they want, they are automatically a background character.) 

After this, still in the beginning of your story, let the character exhibit what needs to change. Show their weaknesses of character and self awareness.
And lastly, hint at what they NEED to learn. Sometimes this is even stated to the character, and they don’t understand it, refuse to believe it, or condemn it. Like “A Christmas Carol”, when Scrooge’s nephew says his speech about Christmas and how wonderful it is, and Scrooge replies “Bah Humbug!" 

2) Desire: This is the moment when the character knows what they need to pursue, in order to obtain what they inwardly want. It is not the inciting incident or catalyst, the event in a story that disrupts the ordinary world and calls the hero on an adventure. This is a separate step entirely, occurring after that catalyst has shattered life as the main character knows it. They believe obtaining this goal will calm whatever inner turmoil or conflict they’re battling. And always, they’re not quite right.
Think of Mr Fredricksen: His goal is to get the house – a  symbolic representation of Ellie and the life he shared with her – to Paradise Falls, which he believes will heal his grief and guilt. It won’t. Once he obtains it, the achievement feels hollow. But I’m getting ahead of myself. So on we go! 

3) Plan: Once in Act Two, the character is going to scramble for a plan of action. The inner want has solidified into a tangible goal, but they need a strategy to achieve it. This also spells out for the reader what to expect in that second act.  

4) Conflict: What’s going to try stopping them? A hero with a goal is one thing, but to make it a story we need something that stands in the way. An obstacle. A force of opposition. If we didn’t have obstacles, books would be as interesting as "Harry Potter and the Trip to the Grocery Store.” (Although honestly, I’d probably read that.) After the catalyst has changed everything, after the character crosses the threshold into Act Two, everything from here on out will be laden with conflict. This is usually when enemies, or more accurately forces of opposition, begin to appear. Everything is accumulating to complicate the main character’s pathway to achieving what they want. The forces of opposition come from not only the villains, but from the actions that have to be taken to achieve the desire. Whatever this action is, it’s exactly what the main character is not suited to do, an action that pressures their flaws, exposes them to exactly what they need to become but can’t right now. 

Like Stitch being forced to be the family dog. He’s not suited to this task.

5) Battle: The forces of opposition are amping up, growing stronger, fighting with greater intensity. The main character is taking the punches and working around them, relentlessly plowing forward. Hero and allies are usually punching back too.

6) Midpoint: This is the event where they first encounter what they need to learn, what they need to become. Something happens that forces them to behave in this new, life-saving way. But once they’ve seen it, they don’t know what to do with this knowledge. 

7) Dark Night, Revelation, Choice:
This is always the darkest point in the story, where all seems lost, and death – of a literal or spiritual nature – is in the air. And in this moment, something usually happens that makes the main character wake up to what is wrong, and what they need. More often than not, this revelation will arrive from the “love story” or relationship of the plot, and will be the thing that helps them pull themselves out of despair and see the light. And once this is uncovered, once the revelation of the truth about themselves is recognized, they are faced with a choice. Of course, they’ve been faced with choices in every beat of every scene, but this is the big choice that is going to determine if their story has a happy ending or a tragic one. The choice is this: “You are being faced the truth that you need to heal. Are you going to choose what you need, let your old self die, and become someone better?” And always, always, always this is a hard choice. The revelation must be significant to them. And it’s never easy. It can’t be. We don’t write stories about heroes who make easy choices. Villains have it easy. Are you going to adopt this new way of living, adopt this truth, and let your old self die? Or are you going to stay the way you are (which feels safer and is much less challenging) but end up stuck in a sort of living death? Most of the time, of course, they choose the right thing. 

This moment is usually always the saddest scene in the thing. Like this scene with Stitch.

8) New Life: This is their changed life. After experiencing the trials of the story, after realizing what they need and choosing to be reborn, they are going to be different people – and are going to live a different life. This is what follows the statement “And every day after …” What has changed? Show the audience how things are different, how things are better, because they want to see that. This is the resolution, the wrapping up of everything we’ve been through with the main character, and having this in the story is often what gives that feeling of satisfaction after seeing a really well-told story. 

So! To show off how this works, I’ve chosen the character arc of Carl from Up. 

1) Hero: Strengths, Weakness, Need

Strengths: Reasons to like Carl are packed into that heartbreaking opening sequence. By the end of it, we love him, love Ellie, and are crying our eyes out.

Weaknesses: Now Carl is curmudgeonly, grumpy, cold, and won’t pay attention to a living soul. He’s also plagued by grief, regret, guilt, and loneliness. (Which we are all 100% okay with, because we already like him.)

Need: He needs Russel. The statement of what he needs to learn isn’t outright said (as it will be later) but Russel represents it. 

Step Two: The catalyst was when a truck knocked down Ellie’s mailbox, Carl hit a construction worker in the head with his cane, and for this a judge declares him a public menace and orders him to go to Shady Oaks Retirement Village. The DESIRE is this moment. 

Carl escapes in a flying house, thousands of balloons lifting him skyward. He even says the desire of the whole story out loud, “So long boys! I’ll send you a postcard from Paradise Falls!” The tangible goal is “live out the rest of his days in his and Ellie’s house, on the edge of Paradise Falls, South America.” (“It’s like America … but South.”)

Step Three: The plan and the conflict overlap, as they are wont to do. We have a scene where Carl is unfurling sails, setting a compass, and settling back in his chair for a smooth journey. But later on, after some conflict has arrived, we have Russel figuring out how to actually make it there. And after even more conflict has arrived, we have him telling Russel “We’re going to walk to the falls quickly and quietly, with no rap music or flash-dancing.”

Step Four: The moment he settles back into his armchair, high above the city, and here’s a knock on the front door, nothing is going to be easy for Carl. First, we have opposition in the form of Russel. Then we have a storm. Then the house lands miles away from the Falls, so they’ll have to walk it. Then we have Kevin, the giant bird. Then we have Dug. Which means they’re also being chased by a legion of talking dogs. Which brings us to Muntz, the main villain, and Carl’s shadow – the representation of Carl’s flaws, and the consequences of refusing to let go of the past. 

Step Five: This is the trek to the Falls. It’s also the battle with every complication that arises. And it’s also exactly what Carl is not suited to do. He’s a curmudgeonly old guy, bent on living out the rest of his life alone. Well, the story says “Nope, Carl, that’s not how it’s going to be” and promptly gives him a surrogate grandson to take care of, a dog who adores him, and even a giant mythical bird. And he has to lead them all, if he’s going to get to the Falls. 

Step Six: The moment when Russel invades Carl’s heart. Which is what he needs, but he doesn’t understand. (I have the scene beated out in the previous post.)

Step Seven: Finally, he gives in to the worst of himself and chooses his goal of living in his broken house on the edge of Paradise Falls. But somehow this doesn’t feel like victory. He’s still alone, next to Ellie’s empty chair, and she is still beyond his reach. 

He picks up her adventure book, and leafs through the photographs, missing her; he pauses on the page scrawled with the words “Stuff I’m Going To Do”, lets his hand rest on it, grief and regret overwhelming him. He begins to close the book, and the page shifts … revealing the edge of another picture. Surprised, he turns the page. It’s their wedding picture.

Ellie added picture after picture of their happy marriage, the whole wonderful life they shared, all the things she did. And on the bottom of the last page is her last message to him: “Thanks for the adventure! Now go have a new one! Love, Ellie.” Exactly what Carl needs. He doesn’t need to be guilty, he doesn’t need to regret the past. The past was beautiful, and she will never truly leave him. 

Choice: So, Carl can make the choice to throw everything out of the house to go save Russel. 

New Life: Sitting on a curb, eating ice cream with Russel.

In the credits, we see a whole new life – or new adventure – with Carl, Russel, Dug, and even a bunch of new puppies.

So, it’s actually pretty simple. And once again, it’s fun to develop your own stories like this, but it’s surprisingly fun to analyze movies and books with it too. It improves your storytelling ability, I’ve found. Practice makes perfect.

I hope this post helps somebody out. It’ll make the ten times I cried while writing it, while watching scenes from Up, worth it.

In the new Beauty And The Beast Gaston is a hero who saved the town. He, according to the filmmakers, comes from a military background and his vanity comes from the love and praise that the village gives him. He and Lefou have, again, according to the filmmakers, a friendship in this film that has spawned over a couple of years and have a ‘married couple’ vibe and not an ‘abused foolish follower’ vibe. At first, I was against it being Lefou who is gay but after doing some actual research I saw that apparently the man Lefou loves in Gaston is the hero of the village, and apparently there is no abuse in their friendship in this movie, so Lefou isn’t falling for an abusive man. The filmmakers have said that Lefou is questioning his feelings when Gaston begins to turn evil after not getting Belle, the one thing he wants, and Lefou is seeing someone becoming corrupt and apparently Lefou will be a fully fledged three dimensional character with an arc. And apparently at the end of the film will have an 'exclusively gay moment’. I hope this means he gets a happy ending away from Gaston and will not be seen as 'the fool’. The director (Bill Condon) and actor playing Gaston (Luke Evans) are gay so I hope that they are really thinking about how this will be presented. I’m not going to judge this until it comes out because it could turn out to be the push Disney needs to get more LGBTQ+ characters. Yes, Lefou is not ideal but it’s what they’ve gone with and I hope he’s represented in a healthy, correct and respectful way which, from what I’ve read, is the exact root they are going for. I’m gay and I know how it feels to love someone who is straight but I also know that you know move on from that and create a better ending for yourself, which I hope they do with Lefou.

youtube
  • Fave thing learned about characters and any difficulties with voicing
    • Josh learned in season 2 that Shiro can loose his cool, loved finding that out about him. With 2 young kids, that voice kinda comes naturally. Loves Shiro’s dark sense of humour when he’s poking fun at his grave injuries
    • Jeremy: for Lance usually lines are kinda there to lighten mood or make people laugh and Jeremy just tries making people in booth laugh and if he’s done that he knows he’s good, like playing off people around
    • Kim: for Allura, didn’t have an accent before and added it to differentiate her from earthlings. trying to find different sound for Allura. Struggles a little, especially with big paragraphs
  • What goes through mind when playing off inner demons like Allura and Keith with Galra, Lance being 7th wheel, Shiro trying to be civil with Slav
    • Jeremy: trying to make it as real as possible, think of something similar that’s happened to you but usually it’s there in the script how characters are feeling. A lot of them are still teenagers so still trying to find place and what is my thing and where I fit. 
    • Kim: for Allura, it can get pretty boring to be a princess, but it’s great she has this mission but also this struggle, love that not just typical princess like in last ep where she’s fighting haggar, has a lot of duality
    • Josh: basically just try to make it real for myself, has to take himself to certain people he knows who are like that. Has a lot in common with Shiro and for the rest just rely on writing and what else he’s seen in show
  • For Allura, bigger arc in second season, internal motivation, conflict
    • Kim: when recorded it, she’s ignoring Keith, acting like a teenager, has moment off screen where she realizes it and that she hasn’t been being better self. Kim was surprised to see comments online about people upset she forgave Keith because “she has right to feel that way” because she never saw it that way
    • Josh: how cool though that an animated show can take an issue like that and make discussions happen
  • What are you excited to see with characters and explore in future
    • Everyone: want Shiro back
    • Jeremy: most excited for Lance to step up into leadership role and be more serious and responsible (at times, cause he’ll always also be Lance). Fun to see people get opportunities to be more mature. Pleasantly surprised when certain characters get to step up and be more serious
  • Fave s2 scenes
    • Josh: chase on cow
    • Kim: Hunk’s slow mo run away from Vrepit Sal’s, Pidge learning Altean with the bear, Coran looking for a mouse for no reason, little precious moments
    • Jeremy: Coran deaging
    • Kim: a lot of good fight scenes, like BoM
  • Kim gets scripts and cannot stop reading, says it’s so fun to be a part of
6

I’ve been called disgusting because of my OTPs about 15 times last month.

Please please PLEASE don’t treat us less human just because you think shipping our OTPs is not right. NO exceptions. You will not become a better person nor make the world a better place by doing that. We won’t stop shipping it, there will only be more hate.

Update: half of those who reblog it don’t understand exactly what I meant here, so I’ll say it boldly: this comic is for those who receive hate because they ship underage/incest/abuse ships and such, not just ships that are unpopular. You say it’s illegal? I’m desperate to see a screenshot of the law which says “shipping fictional characters is prohibited when…”, including the number of the law, name of it’s country (bc I’m not american) and everything. You say it’ll make us want to have such relationships in real life? Well I’m sure you’ve read a lot of books with criminal characters, and you liked them, and apparently that means you’re gonna be criminals too.

I hate it when my words get interpreted the wrong way, so stop saying shit like “oh of course if it’s not about pedophilia!!!”. Yes. Yes it fucking is.

How to incorporate a typical teenage love story into a show

1. Have the two love interests, one will be quirky and ditzy, the other will be a bad boy/rebel

(make sure the quirky/ditzy one is very oblivious, to the point where it actually kills you)

2. Make them hate each other (because they think that they’re complete opposites) so that no one would even guess that they would ever have a relationship in the future

3. Again, you gotta really sell their rivalry, you need to trick your audience

4. Also make sure to subtly show that they’re more similar than they realize 

5. As the story progresses, make it painfully obvious that the bad boy has developed feelings for the quirky/ditzy character by making him jealous and having him flirt a lot 

(make sure the quirky/ditzy character is still completely and utterly oblivious to this)

5. Force a love interest onto the bad boy to cause unnecessary drama 

6. Have a moment where the bad boy saves the quirky/ditzy character from danger

Making it seem as if they’re going to get together

But then they don’t because it’s way too early for that and you gotta keep the audience on their feet!

7. Drag out the rivalry some more (even though it’s mainly just the bad boy being salty that his crush doesn’t recognize in the slightest that he’s pining because they’re oblivious af)

8. Give them a few random moments where they actually enjoy being with each other as well, it makes the audience think there might be something going on between the two but they’re not 100% sure

9. When the bad boy gets into some sort of danger, make the ditzy/quirky/oblivious character finally realize after forever that “Oh shit, I actually do kinda care about this guy.”

9. Distrupt this sudden, important realization that could have actually led to their relationship starting by dropping a huge bomb into the story 

10. Leave the audience on a giant cliffhanger, wondering if this situation will bring them closer together or farther apart.

Maybe in season 100 they’ll possibly get together? Who knows? The audience will just have to wait and see! 

A Stupid Way to come up with Original Characters and Stories (That Somehow Works)
  • Find a character from a work you admire. Any media will do, but Children’s media works the best.
  • Ask yourself a few questions about the character in question. I don’t have a complete list, and the questions are likely going to vary, and most of this is coming off the top of my head, but yeah, here are a few suggestions.
    • Was there anything about this character that ticked you off? Maybe this character did something that you thought was ooc? Or maybe this character is too perfect and could use a few more flaws.
    • Does the medium or genre prevent the character from performing certain actions? Furthermore, do certain aspects of the characters life, including sex, gender, social status, and age prevent this character from acting in a certain way?
    • Is there something you want to see the character do that you know will never happen in the show?
    • And finally, is there anything you want to change about this character?
  • Rant to yourself or to tumblr about everything the show apparently did wrong. Constantly switch between getting mad at yourself for nitpicking a show you love and being mad at the work itself for not being 100% perfect. 
  • Scream into a pillow, make yourself some hot cocoa, eat a full dinner, and then take a hot shower. 
  • Get out a sketchpad or a word document or anything else you use to brainstorm and start drawing and or writing about the character in the show. But write the character the way you think they should be, as opposed to the way their presented in canon. 
    • Take into account that changing some aspects of your character will effect the story in some pretty big ways, especially if what you changed is an action the character performed. Maybe that Magical Princess ran away at a young age under the stress of becoming queen before joining a gang and ultimately becoming a crime boss? Maybe that Alien supervillain can be reformed by showing them the good things about the planet Earth. When you change an aspect of a story, justify the change by having it affect every other aspect of the story. Whatever you do, though, don’t handwave the change. Instead embrace it… those changes are where the heart of your story lies.
    • Don’t be afraid to add in elements from other works of fiction other than the one you’ve chosen. Most of the plot elements of Gravity falls and Rick and Morty, for example, are just similar enough to make a meeting between Ford Pines and Rick Sanchez possible. 
  • Look over your work and note just how far you’ve drifted from canon. If you’ve changed the idea enough, it should feel kinda alien to the original work. If it’s too similar, then if might be a good idea to repeat the previous steps.
    • Some of the things to note include tone, genre, level of obscenity, and target demographic. Considering how fanworks typically go, we almost unconsciously make dark shows light and fluffy and light and fluffy shows dark and gritty. This can be a good thing when done right.
    • The humour of the work will also depends on the type of humour you feel comfortable writing. Sometimes your humour will be almost exactly like the original work, and sometimes it’ll be drastically different. Aim for the latter.
    • If you added in elements from another work of fiction, then certain patterns are inevitably going to be formed. using the Rick and Morty/ Gravity Falls fandom above, one can’t help but make Ford and Rick foils of each other; two interdimensional science dorks, but one has a stronger sense of morality. The character reactions between the two of them is dripping with potential that we’ll never see in canon, because these two shows air on different networks and are aimed at different target demographics.
  • If necessary, repeat the process again, but this time apply this to your version of the character. Continue until your happy with what you have.
  • Finally, rename the characters, and if you’re an artist, re-draw them as well. The new names and designs should reflect the character you wrote, not the character you were inspired by. 
  • And bam, you just made something original. 

Now obviously, this isn’t the only way to make characters or write stories… artists tend to draw from real life just as often as they reference other works of fiction. But the great thing about this process is that it depends entirely on your own personal interpretation of not only the work of fiction in question, but also of how the world around you works. I believe that we, as humans, are natural complainers and nitpickers, constantly believing ourselves to be the sole authority on how the world should work. On one hand, it might be easy to just rant about it and call it a day, but I believe these rants hold quite a lot of creative potential. Writing isn’t about coming up with something wholly new and original… story telling is pretty much limited to the human experience, and we’ll always fall back on something familiar (note the tropeless tale)… instead, its about writing about the familiar in a new way.

Thoughts?