you are the best you are the greatest

Working Girl

A Peter Parker x Reader Drabble

A/N: This is a thank you gift for @riseofthehufflepuffs because she’s my best friend and the greatest person I know and I wanted to write a Peter fic for her for always supporting and being there for me. So, if there are any weird specifics that don’t pertain to you, well, they’re meant for C. 


You hated working, no, hate wasn’t a strong enough word. You loathed it. You weren’t Hillary Duff from A Cinderella Story, you didn’t work in a diner where the popular kids would come to and joke about calories. You worked in a nearby chain restaurant that forced you to interact socially with people you didn’t always care to talk to. Men making awkward flirtatious comments, judgemental stares from people when you ask them to repeat an order, mom’s getting angry at their socially awkward kid for not being able to pick out something to eat; you despised it. 

What sucked the most was when your peers would come around. Not your friends, no, they were always supportive; your peers, on the other hand, were mysterious. You didn’t always care what people thought of you, but watching them walk away and whispering, you couldn’t help but think it was about you. That they thought you were beneath them because you were the same age and you had to work. 

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Lord Akeldama’s own answers:

1. Blondes or brunettes?
Never ask a vampire his favorite flavor, would you wish to eat the same thing every day?
2. What do you think of mini top hats for men?
Why would a gentleman show himself to be smaller?
3. Boxers or briefs? Boxer-briefs?
Knickerbockers.
4. What is the greatest fashion disaster you ever witnessed?
The wrong gentleman in knickerbockers.
5. What is your favorite color?
Sunset.
6. What period of history did you think had the best fashion sense?
French Rococo.
7. What is your favorite fabric?
Satin.
8. Ruffles. A do or don’t?
A discretionary tale.
9. Hat or no hat and if so, which and when?
Hats are worn outside. To protect one from the sun, of course.
10. Where do you acquire your wardrobe?
From my tailor, obviously.
11. Zip then fasten… or fasten then zip?
Button.
12. What would you say is a modern day crime of fashion?
Crocs.
13. Leggings as pants… Yay or nay?
We’re back to knickerbockers.

anonymous asked:

Hi!!! I'm a lil lesbian hufflepuff, but my parents probably wouldn't be too supportive. If coming out goes badly what should I do???

Remus: Let it sit a bit. If they don’t have the greatest reaction, the best way to let them realise that it’s not such a big deal, is to let them cool down. They will take that time to realise that it’s who you are and that the best thing to do is to accept you. But i’m sure they’ll be suportive, don’t doubt yourself and goodluck sweetie!

Krupp: (to George and Harold) You know, being Captain Underpants taught me a valuable lesson. I thought you were my greatest enemies, when all along you were my best friends… it taught me an even more valuable lesson: where the Captain lives in my brain. 

(Mr. Krupp smashes the Hypno Ring)

Mr. Krupp: Goodbye, Captain Underpants.


Source: Portal 2

(I was a tad MIA from Tumblr so I just saw your messages and the love you sent my way so I’m sending it back in the greatest amount possible!!!)

@juggiedeservesbetter Hahaha, I kinda like my name too because it is very rare here in Greece so I thank my mom and her twelve cousins for conducting a poll with possible names when I was born and reaching that decision! 😋 But I’m sure your name is as lovely! Love you too, honey, you are such a sweetheart!❤️

@maldito-sentimentalismo Oh wow, thank you for this wonderful message, dear! I hope you have everything you wished for and so much more and that life treats you in the best possible way as well! Lots of love! ❤️

@wordsonpages1 Love, you just melted my heart and made me forever grateful to you! You’re such a wonderful human being yourself, so sweet, kind and lovable, I can’t even thank you enough for this message! Truly, everything you said applies for you too and I’m so happy to have the chance to chat with you!! An incredibly nice person that has an excellent way with words? Brilliant, you are brilliant! ❤️

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” – Mark Twain

“Do not wait to strike till the iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.” – William Butler Yeats

“It always seems impossible until it’s done.” – Nelson Mandela

“The best way for you to predict your future is to create it.” – Abraham Lincoln

“It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.” – Confucius

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” – Thomas Edison

“Don’t watch the clock; do what it does. Keep going.” – Sam Levenson

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” – Zig Ziglar

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” – Benjamin Franklin

“I am not afraid…I was born to do this.” – Joan of Arc

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.” – Amelia Earhart

“We aim above the mark to hit the mark.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.” – Helen Keller

“The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.“ – Walt Disney

“Consult not your fears but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do.” – Pope John XXIII

“Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.” – Arthur Ashe

“When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot in it and hang on.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

“What you do today can improve all your tomorrows.” – Ralph Marston

“Perserverance is failing 19 times and succeeding the 20th.” – Julie Andrews

“The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” – Thomas Paine

“I attribute my success to this–I never gave or took any excuse.” – Florence Nightingale

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” – Johann Wolfgang van Goethe

“Who seeks shall find.” – Sophocles

“Change your life today. Don’t gamble on the future, act now, without delay.” – Simone de Beauvoir

See Part 2 for more motivation.

How to Kill Feelings of Inadequacy

1. Choose to like, love, value, and believe in yourself. Choose to be your greatest ally – and the best friend you could have.

2. Ask a good friend if they’ll tell you what they like about you most. Then believe what they are saying – don’t just push their words aside.

3. Commit to discovering what you’re good at and enjoy, then invest time in developing those attributes and traits.

4. Don’t exalt others’ gifts as if they matter more than yours. Every talent is important. Don’t right off your personal strengths.

5. Learn to show yourself compassion when you struggle or you fail. And remember “you are human” - so you’re going to make mistakes.

6. Notice ways that you are growing … ways you’re changing over time. Give yourself some credit for this – you are different from before.

Siren Allure Spell

Originally posted by enchantinworld

Sirens are dangerous creatures, who lure nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island. This spell is used to bring allure to your speaking and singing voice, to enchant those around you.  It is best used when a witch is wanting to kill it at an interview, dominate a speech, or perform like the greatest diva.  And it is so simple!

YOU WILL REQUIRE:

–tablespoon of honey
–bowl of sea salt
–glass of water

SPELLWORK:

  1. Begin outside.  (If you are near a body of water, this would be even better.)  Toss a pinch of salt in each of the four directions, saying:
    Northern sirens of rivers carving stone and dark depths, aid me.
    Eastern sirens of cliff drops into jetties and sea spray, aid me.
    Southern sirens of pale sands and hot lava rock, aid me.
    Western sirens of endless horizon and ancient shipwrecks, aid me.
  2. Make a circle with the remaining sea salt, large enough for you to stand in, and step into it.  Shut your eyes.  Envision the tide rolling in over your toes, kissing your ankles, and drawing you out waist deep.  
  3. Open your eyes and distribute your honey onto a spoon.  Recite the following chant:
    For words sweetened as fresh honey,
    for song as powerful as hurricane gales,
    for confidence as strong as undertow,
    for appearance as alluring as siren maidens.
    I am one with the sea and the sea is in me.
  4. Consume the honey.  Let its warmth spread over your tongue, along your teeth, down your throat, and into your stomach.  Concentrate on that heat and feel it spread through your veins.
  5. Taking your glass of water, drink the entirety of it.  When you are finished, say: My siren spell begins now and all will be enchanted.
  6. Step out of the circle and your spell is complete.  It should last one full day.

Hope this helps, darlings!

8

happy 100th birthday, ella fitzgerald // april 25, 1917 - june 15, 1996 // “just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do. where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong”

“The best way to start any musical evening is with [Ella]. It don’t get better than this.” Frank Sinatra

“Man, woman or child, Ella is the greatest of them all.” Bing Crosby

“Ella’s amazing! My daughter says that every time she makes a mistake, it becomes a hit record.” Lucille Ball

“It is so much fun to sing with Ella. It is so nice to sing with someone who does more than make a pretty noise.” Jo Stafford

“If you want to learn how to sing, listen to Ella Fitzgerald.” Vincent Minnelli

“The one radio voice that I listened to above others belonged to Ella Fitzgerald. There was a quality to her voice that fascinated me, and I’d sing along with her, trying to catch the subtle ways she shaded her voice, the casual yet clean way she sang the words.” Doris Day

theguardian.com
Ten things I learned about writing from Stephen King
The novelist James Smythe, who has been analysing the work of Stephen King for the Guardian since 2012, on the lessons he has drawn from the master of horror fiction
By James Smythe

Stephen King is an All-Time Great, arguably one of the most popular novelists the world has ever seen. And there’s a good chance that he’s inspired more people to start writing than any other living writer. So, as the Guardian and King’s UK publisher Hodder launch a short story competition – to be judged by the master himself – here are the ten most important lessons to learn from his work.

1. Write whatever the hell you like

King might be best known – or, rather, best regarded – as a writer of horror novels, but really, his back catalogue is crammed with every genre you can think of. There are thrillers (Misery, Gerald’s Game), literary novels (Bag Of Bones, Different Seasons), crime procedurals (Mr Mercedes), apocalypse narratives (The Stand), fantasy (Eyes Of The Dragon, The Dark Tower series) … He’s even written what I think of as being one of the greatest Young Adult novels of all time: The Long Walk. Perhaps the only genre or audience he hasn’t really touched so far is comedy, but most of his work features moments that show his deft touch with humour. It’s clear that King does what he wants, when he wants, and his constant readers – the term he calls his, well, constant readers – will follow him wherever he goes.

2. The scariest thing isn’t necessarily what’s underneath the bed

Horror is a curious thing. What scares one person won’t necessarily scare another. And while there might be moments in his horror novels that tread towards the more conventional ideas of what some find terrifying, for the most part, the truly scary aspects are those that deal with humanity itself. Ghosts drive people to madness, telekinetic girls destroy whole towns with their powers, clowns … well, clowns are just bloody terrifying full stop. But the true crux of King’s ability to scare is finding the thing that his readers are actually worried about, and bringing that to the fore. If you’re writing horror, don’t just think about what goes bump in the night; think about what that bump might drive people to do afterwards.

3. Don’t be scared of transparency

One of my favourite things about King’s short story collections are the little notes about each tale that he puts into the text. The history of them, the context for the idea, how the writing process actually worked. They’re not only invaluable material for aspiring writers – because exactly how many drafts does it take to reach a decent story? King knows! – but they’re also brilliant nuggets of insight into King himself. Some people might think that it’s better off knowing nothing about authors when they read their work, but for King, his heart is on his sleeve. In his latest collection, The Bazaar of Broken Dreams, King gets more in-depth than ever, talking about what inspired the stories in such an honest way that it couldn’t have come from another writer’s pen. Which brings us to …

4. Write what you know. Sort of. Sometimes

Write what you know is the most common writing tip you’ll find anywhere. It’s nonsense, really, because if we all did that we’d end up with terribly boring novels about writers staring out of windows waiting for inspiration to hit. (If you like those, incidentally, head straight for the literary fiction section of your nearest bookshop.) But King understands that experience is something which can be channelled into your work, and should be at every opportunity. Aspects of his life – addiction, teaching, his near-fatal car accident, rock and roll, ageing – have cropped up in his work over and over, in ways that aren’t always obvious, but often help to drive the story. That’s something every writer can use, because it’s through these truths that real emotions can be writ large on the page.

5. Aim big. Or small

King’s written some mammoth books, and they’re often about mammoth things. The Stand takes readers into an apocalypse, with every stage of it laid out on the page until the final fantastical showdown. It deals with a horror that hits a group of characters twice in their lives, showing us how years and years of experience can change people. And The Dark Tower is a seven (or eight, or more, if you count the short stories set in its world) part series that takes in so many different genres of writing it’s dizzying. When he needs to, King aims really big, and sometimes that’s what you have to do to tell a story. At the other end of the spectrum, some of King’s most enduring stories – Rita Hayworth & Shawshank Redemption, The Mist – have come from his shorter works. He traps small groups of characters in single locations and lets the story play out how it will. The length of the story you’re telling should dictate the size of the book. Doesn’t matter if it’s forty thousand words or two hundred, King doesn’t waste a word.

6. Write all the time. And write a lot

King’s published – wait for it – 55 novels, 11 collections of stories, 5 non-fiction works, 7 novellas and 9 assorted other pieces (including illustrated works and comic books). That’s over a period of 41 years. That’s an average of two books a year. Which is, I must admit, a pretty giddying amount. That’s years of reading (or rereading, if you’re as foolishly in awe of him as I am). But he’s barely stopped for breath. This year has seen three books published by him, which makes me feel a little ashamed. Still, at my current rate of writing, I might catch up with him sometime next century. And while not every book has found the same critical and commercial success, they’ve all got their fans.

7. Voice is just as important as content

King’s a writer who understands that a story needs to begin before it’s actually told. It begins in the voice of the novel: is it first person, or third? Is it past or present tense? Is it told through multiple narrators, or just the one? He’s a master at understanding exactly why each story is told the way it’s told. Sure, he might dress it up as something simple – the story finding the voice it needs, or vice versa – but through his books you can see that he’s tried pretty much everything, and can see why each voice worked with the story he was telling.

8. And Form is just as important as voice

King isn’t really thought of as an experimental novelist, which is grossly unfair. Some of King’s more daring novels have taken on really interesting forms. Be it The Green Mile’s fragmented, serialised narrative; or the dual publication of The Regulators and Desperation – novels which featured the same characters in very different situations, with unsettling parallels between the stories that unfolded for them; or even Carrie’s mixed-media narrative, with sections of the story told as interview or newspaper extract. All of these novels have played with the way they’re presented on the page to find the perfect medium for telling those stories. Really, the lesson here from King is to not be afraid to play.

9. You don’t have to be yourself

Some of King’s greatest works in the early years of his career weren’t published by King himself. They were in the name of Richard Bachman, his slightly grislier pseudonym. The Long Walk, Thinner, The Running Man – these are books that dealt with a nastier side of things than King did in his properly attributed work. Because, maybe it’s good to have a voice that allows us to let the real darkness out, with no judgments. (And then maybe, as King eventually did in The Dark Half, it’s good to kill that voice on the page … )

10. Read On Writing. Now

This is the most important tip in the list. In 2000, King published On Writing, a book that sits in the halfway space between autobiography and writing manual. It’s full of details about his process, about how he wrote his books, channelled his demons and overcame his challenges. It’s one of the few books about writing that are actually worth their salt, mainly because it understands that it’s about a personal experience, and readers might find that useful. There’s no universal truths when it comes to writing. One person’s process would be a nightmare for somebody else. Some people spend years labouring on nearly perfect first drafts; some people get a first draft written in six weeks, and then spend the next year destroying it and rebuilding it. On Writing tells you how King does it, to help you to find your own. Even if you’re not a fan of his books, it’s invaluable to the in-development writer. Heck, it’s invaluable to all writers.

flower asks for fanfic writers

send me a type of flower and i’ll answer the question that corresponds with it! (▰˘◡˘▰)

anemone: how old were you when you first started writing?

baby’s breath: about how many fics have you completed?

carnation: do you only write on tumblr or on other sites? what are they?

daffodil: do you prefer to write about an OC or an unnamed reader (y/n)?

dahlia: what time of day/night is best for you to write?

gardenia: what is the setting in which you write best?

hyacinth: do you prefer to write angst or fluff?

hydrangea: what inspired you to begin writing in the first place?

iris: do you prefer writing about a man or a woman character? why?

lily: do you listen to music when you write? if so, do you have a specific playlist for it?

orchid: do you prefer to write one shots or multi part fics?

peony: au or canon?

poinsettia: is it hard for you to make up names for characters in your fics?

rose: which of your works is your favorite? why?

sunflower: what is the best feedback/compliment you’ve ever received regarding your writing?

daisy: would you ever consider a career in writing?

violet: do you read a lot?

tulip: what is your favorite writing blog on tumblr that you feel deserves more followers and reads?

jasmine: what is the greatest amount of notes you’ve ever received on one of your works?

poppy: do you write your fics right here on your tumblr drafts? if not, where?

buttercup: do you prefer to write requests or come up with your own things?

water lily: what helps you get through writer’s block?

lotus: how many drafts do you currently have?

pansy: do you keep your blog a secret to people you know personally?

petunia: who is your favorite character to write for? why?

lavender: what is the most important thing to you as a writer?

lilac: come up with your own question for me to answer.

deal | pt 1 (m)

Originally posted by sugamysavagebaby

summary: the years spent working hard had really paid off and was it so wrong to want to rub that in a few faces? The cliché mean girls that often teased you for not doing anything with your hair or clothing, wouldn’t it be great to show off someone like Jungkook? High school reunion au + ceo!jeon

word count: 6,366 

part two | part three 


Eyes like ice, cold and calculating narrow over the rim of a wine glass. Soft lips press to the polished glass, the crimson complimenting tan skin. If it weren’t for the soft dent between his brows you would have assumed he had not heard you. He takes his time allowing the wine to caress his palate, eyes closed as he savors the taste.  As always, he makes you wait until the wine glass is drained of it’s dark contents. You ponder on the taste, if it is bitter upon his tongue much like his words.

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150 Self-Discovery & Reflection Journal Prompts

1. What is going well in your life right now? 

2. Think of the last time you had a really great day. What was the best part of it? 

3. Write about a time you felt brave. 

4. How will you enjoy creativity and nature today?

5. List as many things as you can that make you happy. 

6. How can you take a break today? 

7. When is the last time you lost track of time? What were you doing? 

8. What is the last thing you created that you were proud of? 

9. When is the last time you were excited? What was happening? 

10. When do you create the best results or make the best decisions in your life? 

11. How do you enjoy spending your free time most? 

12. What are your greatest strengths? 

13. What values are most important to you? Are you living true to these values? Why or why not? 

14. If you could make a difference in the world, what would it be? 

15. If you had no fear, what would you do? 

16. What is the biggest barrier between you and your full honesty in journaling? 

17. What would you do with $10 million? 

18. Write a letter to your teenage self. 

19. What have you learned today that will make tomorrow better? 

20. What are you most grateful for? 

21. What would you do if you had no fears? 

22. Do you own things, or do things own you? 

23. What happens when you let go of expectations? 

24. What are you currently worrying about? 

25. Who are you? 

26. Who do you want to be? 

27. Write about a difficult time in your life when you showed strength. 

28. What makes you unique? 

29. Write a letter to someone who has supported you through the most difficult time in your life. 

30. What do joy and wellness look and feel like to you? 

31. What qualities do you look for in a friend? 

32. List your accomplishments and successes. 

33. Who made you feel good in this past week?

34. What activities make you feel energized? 

35. Reflect on the happiest moment of your life and write down how you felt, what you heard, etc. 

36. What is your most treasured possession and why?

37. What is the greatest life lesson you’ve ever learned? 

38. How do you feel about your body? 

39. Do you consider yourself a victim of your circumstances or a survivor? 

40. How does journaling help you? 

41. If you could run away, where would you go? What would you bring with you? 

42. What are two unforgettable moments in your life? 

43. Share your innermost secret; something you’ve never told anyone before. 

44. What is one thing you can do today to improve your health? 

45. What is the driving force in your life? 

46. What is your personal motto? 

47. Write a letter to someone you need to forgive. 

48. What are you angry about? 

49. How do you want to be remembered? What do you want to be remembered for? 

50. Choose a number and write a gratitude list. 

51. What do you need right now? 

52. Who or what means the world to you, and why? 

53. Share your favorite positive affirmations. 

54. What are you passionate about? 

55. Reflect on an old photograph and write about it. 

56. Write your own obituary. 

57. How do you manage stress? 

58. How does it feel to be the age that you currently are? 

59. What does authenticity mean to you? 

60. What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever received? Who was it from? Why is it the best? 

61. Do you practice any time management techniques? If not, do you think you could benefit from some? 

62. If you could relive any experience in your life, what would it be? 

63. Are you addicted to social media? Honestly assess yourself. 

64. Reflect on some of the changes you’ve seen in yourself over the last 5 years. 

65. What is your earliest childhood memory? 

66. Write a review of a book or movie that had a huge impact on you.

 67. What does growing older mean to you? 

68. What is your guilty pleasure? 

69. Write a letter to your future or current child. 

70. Look in the mirror and write about what you see. 

71. Where do you see yourself in 5, 10, 20 years? 

72. Write about your family members. 

73. Why is it important to embrace your inner child? 

74. What excites you about your future? 

75. List 5 short-term and long-term goals. Explain the steps you’ll take to achieve each of those goals. 

76. Share your bucket list. 

77. What bad habits do you have? 

78. Write about the place you grew up. 

79. Discuss an important and controversial topic that is relevant in the world right now and explain your stance on it. 

80. Write a letter to a pre-teen about body image. 

81. How do you maintain your mental, physical, and spiritual health? 

82. Are you honestly happy with how you have lived your life so far? 

83. What do you really, truly want? 

84. How can you amplify what you’re currently doing in your life? 

85. How can you make someone’s day today? 

86. What are you currently fighting or resisting? 

87. What does life want from you? 

88. What do you need to give yourself permission to do? Write a permission slip for it, as long as it is healthy. 

89. What do you want to learn today? 

90. What would happen if you forgave yourself for doing something you regret? 

91. How can you do more? 

92. How can you do less? 

93. Do you ever get in your own way? How? 

94. On this long journey of self-discovery, what do you hope to achieve or find?

95. What do you think shaped you into the person you are today? 

96. Knowing that you must let go of some things in order to move forward, what do you need to let go of? 

97. Is there anything you need to get off your chest? Write it out. 

98. When do you feel free and the most confident? 

99. List questions you need answers to. 

100. When you’re old and gray, what do you hope you remember about your life? 

101. Do you have depression or anxiety? If so, write about what it feels like, what it looks like, etc. 

102. What is motivating you to journal for self-discovery? 

103. Write a list of people you can trust or go to in times of need. Note contact information. 

104. If you lost everything, what would you do? Where would you go? 

105. If you knew you had a month to live, who would you call? What would you say? What would you do? 

106. How is your relationship with your parents? 

107. What is your dream job or profession? 

108. What is your stance on religion? Do you consider yourself religious? 

109. What is the most outrageous thing you’ve ever done? 

110. What is worse: never trying, or trying and failing many times? 

111. What is the worst thing that’s ever happened to you? 

112. What would you change about your body? 

113. What does success actually mean to you?

114. How do you express your anger? Is this a good or healthy manner of expression? 

115. If you had 3 wishes, what would you wish for? 

116. List some of your favorite songs and note why you like them. 

117. Do you have any sexual fantasies? 

118. What is the biggest mistake you’ve ever made? 

119. Write a letter to someone you strongly admire. 

120. Do you procrastinate? When? What could you do to stop procrastinating?

121. What are your weaknesses? 

122. Describe your favorite season and why you like it. 

123. Write about how your sense of style has changed over the past 5 years. 

124. What is the meaning of life? 

125. What is your life’s purpose? 

126. What are you currently craving? 

127. What is something you would love to do, but aren’t sure if you can do? 

128. When do you feel the best about yourself? 

129. When do you feel the worst about yourself? 

130. Who are you not? 

131. How does your intuition or conscience speak to you? 

132. What aspect of your life do you need support in? 

133. What gave you great joy today? 

134. Did you feel lovable today? Why or why not? 

135. What expectations of yours haven’t been met recently? Why or why not? 

136. When you think about your future, how do you feel? 

137. Write about some of the negative things your inner critic says to you, and then disprove them with rational thoughts. 

138. If your life could be summarized or exuded in one word, what would that word be? 

139. Write about a moment experienced through your body. It could be making love, eating breakfast, laughing, etc. 

140. What couldn’t you live without? 

141. What does unconditional love look like to you? 

142. What do you wish others knew about you? 

143. If your body could talk to you, what would it say? 

144. What do you love about life? 

145. What emotions do you feel or associate with confidence? 

146. What are some things you’d like to say no to? 

147. How can having a positive attitude change your life? 

148. Write a pep talk to yourself for use the next time you feel upset or depressed. 

149. Write a letter to your future self. 

150. What have you learned by journaling for self-discovery?

Here’s a message to Christians and Catholics, from a Catholic born kid in a Catholic majority country

If you put heaven above your own life on earth, you are ungrateful. You are spitting in God’s face. He made this world for you and all the people in it and you’re saying “nah, I don’t like it, fuck it, I’ll wait for better”. 

Worse still is convincing people the world is a terrible place you can ignore and abandon instead of doing what you can to make it better. 

That’s not Christianity. Christianity is being a steward of creation. Taking care of the world God gave you. Taking care of people. If you think you’re gonna get into heaven by ignoring the world you’re supposed to be taking care of, I can assure you wholeheartedly that you’re gonna get in death what you gave to others in life: 

Absolutely nothing. 

You have been given the greatest gift–life. And wasting that life on prayer and hopes instead of good action and service and help? Well, you know the story of the talents? If you’ve had bible studies, I’m sure you remember. 

The man who buried his talents in the ground, who did nothing for nobody, was punished.

If you truly believe yourself to be a Christian, waiting on heaven and not doing your best to make the earth better, whether environmentally or socially, means you’ve failed as one. 

Kindness doesn’t need a religion but religions are nothing without kindness.

“You will never win if you never begin.” – Helen Rowland

“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.” – Jack London

“A somebody was once a nobody who wanted to and did.” – John Burroughs

“If you can dream it, you can do it.” —Walt Disney

“Do not wait; the time will never be ‘just right.’ Start where you stand, and work with whatever tools you may have at your command, and better tools will be found as you go along.” — George Herbert

“Step by step and the thing is done.” – Charles Atlas

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” — Eleanor Roosevelt

“If you don’t ask, you don’t get.” – Stevie Wonder

“There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes. But with hard work, there are no limits.” — Michael Phelps

“One way to keep momentum going is to have constantly greater goals.” — Michael Korda

“Be gentle to all and stern with yourself.” – Saint Theresa of Avila

“You just can’t beat the person who never gives up.” —Babe Ruth

“The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.” — Ernest Hemingway

“Things do not happen. Things are made to happen.” – John F. Kennedy

“He who believes is strong; he who doubts is weak. Strong convictions precede great actions.” — Louisa May Alcott

“Without discipline, there’s no life at all.” – Katharine Hepburn

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” —Friedrich Nietzsche

“Sometimes you don’t realize your own strength until you come face to face with your greatest weakness.” — Susan Gale

“Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.” — Thomas Jefferson

“There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that’s your own self.“ – Aldous Huxley

“Doing the best at this moment puts you in the best place for the next moment.” – Oprah Winfrey

“From my tribe I take nothing, I am the maker of my own fortune.” – Tecumseh

See Part 1 for more motivation!