yet he was intrepid

J e h a n P r o u v a i r e:

“He loved to saunter through fields of wild oats and corn-flowers, and busied himself with clouds nearly as much as events. He spoke softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid. Yet he was intrepid.”

Les Mis Moodboards: 1/?

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.”He meowed softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward air, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid. Yet he was intrepid.”

#46: Jehan Purrvaire, from Les Meowserables by Victor Mewgo

Don’t be fooled by his flowery floofiness…Jehan is as much a diehard revolutionary as the other members of Les Ameows….

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jehan aesthetic

Jean Prouvaire was in love; he cultivated a pot of flowers, played on the flute, made verses, loved the people, […] He spoke softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward air, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid. Yet he was intrepid.

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“Above all, he was good; and, a very simple thing to those who know how nearly goodness borders on grandeur, in the matter of poetry, he preferred the immense….He spoke softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward air, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid. Yet he was intrepid.”

Jehan Prouvaire moodboard

❝ℑean Prouvaire was in love; he cultivated a pot of flowers, played on the flute, made verses, loved the people, pitied woman, wept over the child… He spoke softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward air, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid. Yet he was intrepid.❞ 

modern au phototelling: Jehan

Jean Prouvaire was a still softer shade than Combeferre;
he was addicted to love;
he cultivated a pot of flowers, played on the flute, made verses, loved the people, pitied woman, wept over the child;
his voice was ordinarily delicate, but suddently grew manly;
he was learned even to erudition;
he knew italian, latin, greek, and hebrew; and these served him only for the perusal of four poets: Dante, Juvenal, Aeschylus and Isaiah;
he loved to saunter through fields of wild oats and corn-flowers;
all day long, he buried himself in social questions, and at night, he glazed upon the planets, those enormous beings.
He spoke softly, bowed his head, lowered his eyes, smiled with embarrassment, dressed badly, had an awkward air, blushed at a mere nothing, and was very timid.
Yet he was intrepid.