yes yoko ono

Yoko Ono’s “Cleaning Pieces”

CLEANING PIECE I 

Write down a sad memory. 

Put it in a box. 

Burn the box and sprinkle the ashes in the field. 

You may give some ashes to a friend who shared the sadness. 


CLEANING PIECE II 

Make a numbered list of sadness in your life. 

Pile up stones corresponding to those numbers. 

Add a stone, each time there is sadness. 

Burn the list, and appreciate the mount of stones for its beauty. 

Make a numbered list of happiness in your life. 

Pile up stones corresponding to those numbers. 

Add a stone, each time there is happiness. 

Compare the mount of stones to the one of sadness. 


CLEANING PIECE III 

Try to say nothing negative about anybody. 

a) For three days 

b) For forty-five days 

c) For three months 

See what happens to your life. 


CLEANING PIECE IV 

Write down everything you fear in life. 

Burn it. 

Pour herbal oil with a sweet scent on the ashes. 


CLEANING PIECE V 

Let a list of arbitrary names come into your mind as you go to sleep. 

Say “bless you” after each name. 

Do this with speed, by keeping a constant rhythm, so, in no way, you would hesitate to bless them.

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witchery
“If I am a witch, then so be it, I said. And I took to eating black things - huitlacoche the corn mushroom, coffee, dark chiles, the bruised part of fruit, the darkest, blackest things to make me hard and strong” - Sandra Cisneros

1. waking the witch - kate bush // 2. drumming song - florence + the machine // 3. psalms 40:2 - the mountain goats // 4. wicked spell - diane izzo // 5. your honor - regina spektor // 6. bad moon rising - rasputina // 7. paris is burning - st. vincent // 8. 64 little white things - cake bake betty // 9. katrinah josephina - universal hall pass // 10. we are on fire - cocorosie // 11. flowers and blood - mariee sioux // 12. cryptozoology - paper bird // 13. curses - eskimeaux // 14. yes, i’m a witch - yoko ono

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I got the word that this amazing woman was putting on a show the next week, something about people in bags, in black bags, and it was going to be a bit of a happening and all that. So I went to a preview the night before it opened. I went in — she didn’t know who I was or anything — and I was wandering around. There were a couple of artsy-type students who had been helping, lying around there in the gallery, and I was looking at it and was astounded. There was an apple on sale there for two hundred quid; I thought it was fantastic. I didn’t have too have much knowledge about avant-garde or underground art, the humor got me straightaway. There was a fresh apple on a stand — this was before Apple — and it was two hundred quid to watch the apple decompose. But there was another piece that really decided me for-or-against the artist: a ladder which led to a painting which was hung on the ceiling. It looked like a black canvas with a chain with a spyglass hanging on the end of it. This was near the door when you went in. I climbed the ladder, you look through the spyglass and in tiny little letters it says ‘yes’. So it was positive. I felt relieved. It’s a great relief when you get up the ladder and you look through the spyglass and it doesn’t say 'no’ or 'fuck you’ or something, it said 'yes’.
… And she came up and handed me a card which said 'breathe’ on it, one of her instructions, so I just went [pant]. This was our meeting. — John Lennon

Happy birthday, Yoko Ono.

Andy Warhol and Divine at a party in Andy’s honor at the re-opening of the Copacabana nightclub. Allan Tannenbaum, 1976.

Interview: Allan Tannenbaum with Justin Strauss

If you weren’t there to see it but can imagine in your mind New York City in the ‘70s, you can thank Allan Tannenbaum. Tannenbaum worked as chief photographer for Soho Weekly in the ‘70s and ‘80s, extensively documenting the music, glitter, fashion and magic of Downtown New York in an era when Art was Queen and nightlife, the great equalizer.

Find here an interview between two of New York’s most treasured gems — music producer, remixer and DJ Justin Strauss and photographer Allan Tannenbaum, who first met in 1981 when Tannenbaum snapped Strauss’ portrait during a DJ night at New York’s legendary club, The Ritz. We caught them chatting on a bench at The Gallery at Ace Hotel New York where Allan Tannenbaum’s retrospective show Take Me to Funkytown: New York in the 70s is on display until Monday. 

Justin Strauss: Hi Allan. Let’s start at the beginning. What inspired you to want to become a photographer? Was there someone? A photograph?

Allan Tannenbaum: I was with a friend who had a nice 35mm camera.

JS: Wait, how old were you? 

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