yen le

The rhetoric that demonizes anti-Latino and anti-Asian immigrants is disturbing not only for what it says, but more so for what it does not say. By portraying immigration to the United States as a matter of desperate individuals seeking opportunities, it completely disregards the aggressive roles that the U.S. government and U.S. corporations have played— through colonialism, imperialist wars and occupations, capital investment and material extraction in Third World countries and through active recruitment of racialized and gendered immigrant labor— in generating out-migration from key sending countries. As Joe Feagin reminds us, “recent immigrants have mostly come from countries that have been substantially influenced by imperialistic efforts by U.S. corporations and by the U.S. government around the globe.” This portrayal of immigration stigmatizes the immigrants as desperate, undeserving, and even threatening, and delinks contemporary immigration from past U.S. corporate, military, or governmental actions abroad.

As I watched this spectacle of border making, I was reminded of my own bordercrossing experience. In 1975, when tens of thousands of Vietnamese refugees, including my own family, arrived in the United States, the majority of Americans did not welcome us. A Harris poll taken in May 1975 indicated that more than 50 percent of the American public felt that Southeast Asian refugees should be excluded; only 26 percent favored their entry. Many seemed to share Congressman Burt Talcott’s conclusion that, “Damn it, we have too many Orientals.” Five years later, public opinion toward the refugees had not changed. A 1980 poll of American attitudes in nine cities revealed that nearly half of those surveyed believed that the Southeast Asian refugees should have settled in other Asian countries. This poll also found that more than 77 percent of the respondents would disapprove of the marriage of a Southeast Asian refugee into their family and 65 percent would not be willing to have a refugee as a guest in their home. Anti-Southeast Asian sentiment also took violent turns. Refugees from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia in many parts of the United States have been attacked and even killed; and their properties have been vandalized, firebombed, or burned. The antirefugee rhetoric was similar to that directed against Latino immigrants: Southeast Asians were morally, culturally, and economically deficient— an invading multitude, unwanted and undeserving.

- Yen Le Espiritu, “Homes, Borders, and Possibilities,” in Asian American Studies Now (2010) 

Say it with me: I AM NOT MAD THAT THERE WILL NOT BE A NEW VnC CHAPTER RELEASED IN THE GANGAN JOKER OCT ISSUE. I TOTALLY UNDERSTAND, MOCHIJUN NEEDS TO REST ONCE IN A WHILE SINCE SHE IS ONLY HUMAN LIKE I AM. FURTHERMORE, I AM OVERLY GRATEFUL FOR THE EFFORT SHE PUTS IN VnC (just as she’s put in PH), AND I VALUE THE EXCEPTIONAL LENGTH OF THE PREVIOUS CHAPTERS WE’VE GOT. FINALLY, I WISH FOR MOCHIJUN TO TAKE ALL TIME SHE NEEDS TO REST AND RECOVER.

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YẾN LÊ ft YANBI - “CÒ LẢ“

Gece sükût,
gece derin,
gece din-le-yen,
gece anlayışlı,
gece saklayan,
gece dua,
gece teheccüd,
gece tefekkür,
gece iyi,
gece yoldaş,
gece sırdaş,
gece yaren,
gece vefalı…

Mehmet Deveci

“Reiko debout”, 1923, de

Kishida Ryūsei岸田劉生 (1894 - 1929).

Bien qu’inconnu en Occident, Ryūsei Kishida est considéré au Japon comme l’un des plus grands peintres du xxe siècle. Lié au mouvement Shirakaba (1910-1923), il symbolise, dans les manuels scolaires par exemple, la modernité de l’ère Taishō (1912-1926). Depuis les années 1940, plusieurs grands historiens de l’art japonais moderne ont travaillé sur son œuvre, mettant en évidence la spécificité de son réalisme et sa critique originale des avant-gardes.

En dépit du petit format de ses tableaux, il est l’un des artistes les plus cotés sur le marché nippon. En 2000, sa toile Reiko un châle sur les épaules (1920) a été adjugée 360 millions de yens, établissant le record pour une œuvre moderne japonaise.

Another colored illustration from Takahiro Arai’s twitter! The accompanying caption roughly translates as,”He’s a bit strict, but…”

Meanwhile, the text in the comic (referencing the Tokyo version of the Les Mis Musical going on the road) reads:

Enjolras: Citizens, on June 10, we’ll gather at the Chunichi Theater in Nagoya!

Marius: The price of the shinkansen [bullet train] though…

marieechristine  asked:

hi, do you know any scholarly work that discusses hyper sexualization of the filipina and reclaiming those narratives?

Articles:

- “Bodies, Letters, Catalogs: Filipinas in Transnational Space” by Rolando B. Tolentino

“The Filipina’s Breast: Savagery, Docility, and the Erotics of the American Empire” by Nerissa Balce

“Performing the Filipina ‘Mail Order Bride:’ Queer Neoliberalism, Affective Labor, and Homonationalism” by Gina Velasco

“‘We Don’t Sleep Around Like White Girls Do:’ Family, Culture, and Gender in Filipina American Lives” by Yen Le Espiritu

Books:

- Body Politics: Essays on Cultural Representations of Women’s Bodies ed. by Odine de Guzman

- Fantasy Production: Sexual Economies and Other Philippine Consequences for the New World Order by Neferti Tadiar

- Forbidden Fruit: Women Write the Erotic ed. by Tina Cuyugan

- The Hypersexuality of Race: Performing Asian/American Women on Screen and Scene by Celine Parrenas Shimizu

- Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory ed. by Melinda Luisa de Jesus

Sexuality and the Filipina by Lilia Quindoza Santiago

- Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina by Denise Cruz

- Walang Hiya: Literature Taking Risks Toward Liberatory Practice ed. by Lolan Buhain Sevilla and Roseli Ilano

Allo, Génération Y à Babyboomers

Je suis en colère. Pour pas changer. Mais bon, vous me direz en même temps, j'ai pas créé ce blog parce que je suis heureuse au pays des licornes et des papillons. Si j'ai créé ce tumblr c'est pour pointer du doigt ce qui va pas et tenter de faire en sorte d'améliorer un peu les choses. Alors bon, voilà, je me lance, et je commence par mettre les choses au clair : je suis en colère.

Et cette fois-ci, c'est à nos vieux que je vais m'en prendre. Nos parents. Les ex-soixantuitards. Tous ces gens nés juste après la guerre. Ils commencent à avoir les cheveux grisonnants, la vue qui baisse et les idéaux qui s'étiolent. J'irai pas jusqu'à citer Brel sur un air bien connu, parce que les babyboomers sont pas tous des bourgeois, notez, mais c'est pas l'envie qui manque.

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Bob Hope Christmas Special (1967)

I got caught in a deep dive into Bob Hope USO performances at military bases during the Vietnam War. I’m fascinated by these programs, thinking about musical/comedy performances in a different kind of camp setting from Japanese Incarceration or refugee camps, but one that is still militarized, operating under incredibly stressful conditions, and featuring working musicians and entertainers offering escape in multiple ways from the reality of the day to day situation.

Yen Le Espiritu, in her excellent book Body Counts about Vietnamese refugees, discusses her idea of the militarized refugee, in which she discusses how the Vietnamese and other southeast Asian folk who left in the 70s and 80s and came to the US, traveled through spaces of American military imperialism, from holding camps in the Philippines and Guam (sites of American occupation in the 20th century) and eventually landing at Camp Pendleton before being released into America. Throughout the process they underwent training in English and American culture to become “good” refugees, which in turn shifted the narrative of the USA as a place of “good refuge” helping us to forget America the invading and occupying force (in a long string of invading and occupying forces in Vietnam). 

In this performance, from a 21st century lens, plays tone-deaf and ignorant to issues of race, cultural sensitivity, gender and sexuality. Bob Hope is an amazing performer, absolutely, but a lot of this is hard to watch. The exchange at the beginning with Miss World 1967 is really interesting. Hope asks Madeleine Hartog Bell (from Peru) what her measurements are and it’s disarming to see a horde of soldiers yell and applaud the measurements of her body. Later in the program when the talented Raquel Welch is featured, the crowd explodes. She holds her own as a comedian with Hope, but their script positions her and all women as objects and prizes for these men. I think about about how there might be a militarized sexuality, or militarize patriarchy or something at play here which might lay Epsiritu’s work on top of the gender and sexuality at work in these performances. The control and release of these huge masses of men’s sexual desires is astounding. Homophobic jokes are tossed around with almost as much regularity as sexist jokes, in order, it seems to me to establish a red-blooded, heterosexual soldier. Somewhere in there, there seems to be a message that Raquel Welch, American bombshell, and beyond that, MISS WORLD, represent what these men are fighting for and what these men will be promised upon their return home. 

(Raquel Welch)

Around 38min, a soldier from Arkansas is brought up to speak in French with Madeleine Hartog Bell for her second appearance of the special. She speaks seductive phrases in French to the soldier, and at the end of the bit and some gentle ribbing, Hope turns to the soldier and earnestly says, “No, you’re great. With your kind of spirit we could be in Hai Phong in the morning. I think you did a great job.” Hope then turns to Madeleine and says, “How bout a little reward for him, don’t you think he deserves it.” The crowd of soldiers goes nuts, “Oh YEAH!” you hear someone scream. The Arkansas soldier breaks into a full grin and encourages the men to applaud even louder to convince Miss World. The crowd cheers wildly and Madeleine kisses the soldier on the lips. Now, she might be into this, she might hate it. It’s part of an act, but it does skirt a serious line between entertainer and sexual object. For all of us not so red-blooded American men in the 21st century, Hope using her kiss and beauty as a reward for this soldier, who is representing all of the soldiers and is who they live vicariously through in this moment of sexual voyeurism, well, there’s a lot to think about.

Just working stuff out, for the moment, but these Hope shows are really fascinating.