ye shoppe

Ye Magick Shoppe for 5E

By Dracomortua:

Your players’ ship arrives at the docks at last. They go up to the first stevedore or whombler they see and say: ‘Excuse me there, hard working fellow - but where is the local magic shop?’:

Suddenly this all takes a sharp turn and the DM goes 'Out Of Character’: “What? Magic shop?” You kindly explain that there isn’t such a thing. Says so right there in the DMG, see? It is impossible for one to exist in a 5e D&D world. Period.

Your sassy players do not give up. Someone points out such shops exist here in reality on Earth, despite having no provable magic. There are even different kinds (lots sell incense and religious stuff, some selling bits o’ stone, people may want to stare at your crystal balls and it just goes wild from there). They point out a variant human’s feat can give any commoner a bunch of cantrips and one first level spell. So why doesn’t anyone own anything enchanted?

This guide gives you RaW self-defense. You can have as many magic shops as you like without breaking any rules. The trick is to put items in them that are interesting, fun and even useful despite the fact that almost nothing is an uncommon or rare magic item.

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tomorrow is m'last day at hell job (finally).. then i get my roots/hair fixed and end the 🍮🌻 era (for now).. and have the weekend off.. where i will rest and probably go take pics of 🐄🐏🐑🌳🌾🌼 (hopefully)… then i start @ ye olde 🍫 shoppe (that’s not its name i jst like saying “ye olde”).. good month start perhaps? *knocks on 🌳* (wood comes from trees)

The Icelandic Language still uses the letters Þ and Ð, which used to be in the English alphabet too but which fell into disuse and were eventually left out altogether. Their pronunciation is the sound made by the “th” in “this” and “that” respectively.

Incidentally, the Þ was not included in early English printing press types. As a substitute they used y, which looks somewhat similar. Thus was the popular misconception born that English people used to say “ye” as in “ye old shoppe.”

anonymous asked:

Hello! What does the pronoun 'ye' mean? Is it the same as 'you'?

‘Ye’ is the same as ‘you’ but only in certain circumstances. It’s the nominative personal pronoun for the plural ‘you’ or formal single person ‘you’. Here’s the table of conjugations which is probably easier to understand: 

Nominative means that it’s the pronoun that is the subject of the sentence. So if we take the example sentence ‘I like Shakespeare’, ‘I’ is the nominative pronoun. All of the following would be correct:

  • We like Shakespeare
  • Thou likest Shakespeare
  • He/she/it likes Shakespeare
  • They like Shakespeare

But also

  • You like Shakespeare
  • Ye like Shakespeare

Both of which can refer to either a single person (formal in early modern English) or multiple people.

There are also sentences like ‘I’m pedantic, aren’t I?’ where the nominative pronoun can come (again) at the end of a sentence. It would be correct to use ye in this context too: ‘Ye are pedantic, aren’t ye?’

If you’re an advanced or a native speaker of English you probably know that 

  • Me like Shakespeare
  • Us like Shakespeare
  • Him/her/it like Shakespeare
  • Them like Shakespeare

Are all incorrect. These are the oblique pronouns and can only be used in sentences where the pronoun is not the subject but is being affected by a subject and a verb. So in the sentence ‘Hamlet wants me to go to a nunnery’, ‘me’ is the oblique pronoun being affected by the subject (Hamlet) and the verb (to go). The following sentences would be correct:

  • Hamlet wants you to go to a nunnery
  • Hamlet wants us to go to a nunnery
  • Hamlet wants thee to go to a nunnery
  • Hamlet wants him/her/it to go to a nunnery
  • Hamlet wants them to go to a nunnery

In this instance, you cannot use ‘ye’.

It’s worth mentioning that the use of ‘ye’ in phrases like ‘Ye olde shoppe’ is actually a kind of mistake based on the fact that printing presses didn’t have a thorn (Þ) symbol and (confusingly) ended up replacing them with a y. It’s not wrong to write it as such, but the pronunciation should actually be a ‘th’ sound, not a ‘y’, so it should sound like ‘The olde shoppe’

The Hollies, Evolution
(Parlophone PMC7022)
Released: June 1967
Chart Position: #13

Side A: “Then the Heartaches Begin" • “Stop Right There" • "Water on the Brain" • “Lullaby to Tim” • "Have You Ever Loved Somebody?“ • "You Need Love”
Side B: “Rain on the Window" • "Heading for a Fall" • "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe" • "When Your Light’s Turned On" • "Leave Me" • "The Games We Play"

it’s hard to show your excitement about medieval studies. we’re like dID YOU KNOW THE WORD DRUID COMES FROM THE PROTOCELTIC DRU-WID-ES WHICH MEANS OAK-KNOWER OR OAK-SEER? AND WAS LOANED FOR OLD ENGLISH AS “DRY”? or dID YOU KNOW THAT “YE OLDE TEA SHOPPE” MEANS “THE OLD TEA SHOP” BECAUSE THE EQUIVALENT OF THE MODERN TH-SOUND WAS THE THORN:  þ AND MOST PEOPLE WROTE IT LOOKING LIKE A Y AND THEN IT BECAME INTERCHANGEABLE?? 

cool things about the history of english

- In old english the letter thorn (equivalent to modern day theta or eth) was written þ, but over time the way the letter was written changed so by middle english, the sound “th” was written with a Y. So when you see “ye old shoppe” the “ye” is actually pronounced “the”.

- In early modern english there were formal and informal second person pronouns. English has lost the informal “thou/thee”. This phenomenon occurred first in the north american colonies. Interestingly, the portuguese colony brazil lost its informal second person pronoun (tu) as well and only uses the formal você (this might be the case for spanish too but idk).

- What we refer to as irregular verbs in english actually used to be the standard. Only the verbs we use most often have failed to switch to the new system of conjugating verbs in english.

- Because English has had so many influences from other languages it has many synonyms. For most words of germanic origin you can find a latin-derived synonym (kin/family, lucky/fortunate). There is also the well known distinction between anglo-saxon roots of animals (cow, sheep) and the norman french roots of the words for the meat from those animals (beef, mutton). 

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Are you a tabletop-loving nerd? Good news! Ye Olde Nerd Shoppe has all kinds of goodies for your gaming needs! Come over and take a look! We have items in a variety of price ranges, and we’re adding more all the time to ensure there’s something for everyone!

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