ya-romance

Everyone is afraid of something. We fear things because we value them. We fear losing people because we love them. We fear dying because we value being alive. Don’t wish you didn’t fear anything. All that would mean is that you didn’t feel anything.
—  Cassandra Clare, Lord of Shadows
ya  books with romance & asian protagonists

bc asians can have love stories too okay

bolded = ownvoices; mc = main character; li = love interest; * = to be released; *** = romance is side plot

contemporary:

historical:

sci-fi/fantasy:

note: i haven’t read all of these, and i’m not sure of how much romance are in some of these, especially some of the ones that are to be released

also note: @asianya​ is a good resource for books with asian protagonists and has more recs

last note: you may have noticed that i didn’t include some of the popular ones; that was probably on purpose :)

Hey friends, DARE is almost here!!!

Release Date: July 28, 2017

Here’s a pre-release giveaway to celebrate!

One winner will receive:

  • If within the U.S. - A signed paperback & magnetic character bookmarks
  • If outside the U.S. - An unsigned paperback & signed character bookplate

Guidelines:

  • You must be 18 years or older to enter, or have your parent’s permission. This book is Mature YA.
  • You do not need to be following me, but it would be very much appreciated.
  • Either reblog and/or like this post to enter. Multiple reblogs are okay, but please don’t spam your followers. No giveaway blogs.
  • Do NOT leave personal information in comments or reblogs.
  • No purchase necessary. Giveaway is void where prohibited.
  • Giveaway ends on Monday, July 24th, at 11:59 pm Pacific.
  • The winner will be chosen randomly, contacted via Tumblr messaging, and have 48 hours to respond before a new winner is chosen.

DARE:

A Hotheaded Prisoner

They say she’s mad—made of madness, made of fire. In a cage by the sea, Flare dreams of escape. She yearns for the day when she’ll flee to a place only she knows, a hidden world of mystical waters and gilded sands.

The island is calling to her. And she she won’t let anyone keep her from it.

Especially not him.

A Coldhearted Prince

They say he’s cruel—crowned of cruelty, as cold as ice. A prince whose gaze cuts like the incisions he administers within his lab. Jeryn has sailed beyond his kingdom for the Trade, to bargain for those wild, imprisoned fools that make his skin crawl.

By law, they’re subjects meant for experimentation. And easy to despise.

One in particular. A girl seething at him from behind bars, with burning eyes and ready fists.

A Mythical Shipwreck

But on the cusp of transport, the tide rages. That uncharted island awaits, a dark tangle of foliage where creatures slither in the mist and poisons lurk in the flora.

Stranded, the prince and prisoner must fight to survive. In this mysterious rainforest, they must band together … if they don’t slay one another first. Or become something more to each other.

Something just as dangerous.

*Book Two in the Foolish Kingdoms duology: same universe, different couple. Can be read as a standalone, though it’s recommended to read TRICK first.*

*Mature YA: sexual content and language. Intended for readers 17 and older.*

Add DARE to your Goodreads shelf

So that’s it, guys! Good luck!
~Natalia

every time you
tell your daughter
you yell at her
out of love
you teach her to confuse
anger with kindness
which seems like a good idea
till she grows up to
trust men who hurt her
cause they look so much
like you
—  (to fathers with daughters) milk and honey, rupi kaur
Writing Character Arcs

Post suggested by @amethystvalkyrie.

Let’s get this out straight away: You cannot disregard character arcs. The way you can think of character arcs is that readers usually come for the plot but stay for the character because you can have a kick ass plot but if the characters don’t have depth and don’t grow or change throughout, then the readers can’t connect to the story. Readers need to care about the character to care about what they are going through and the best way to do this is through their arc. Now, though attention to character is always important, certain genres demand more than others just like certain genres demand more plot than others. For example, literary, contemporary YA, and romance put more emphasis of character than more plot-driven genres like thriller, adventure, fantasy and sci fi. In any case, character arc enhances the story but it can be tricky to understand how create this arc and how to use it to better the story, so here are some tips:

  • Really, think of it as a curve. Okay, so maybe not a nice smooth curve, more like one with a bunch of bumps and squiggles in it. Also, the direction of this curve depends on who you want your character to become. Usually, a protagonist will arc up, starting at point where they have some personal obstacles to overcome, whether this is just a few things or a major attitude adjustment. You can also have characters that arc down and progressively get worse, like a villain or a tragic hero. The point is that as the time goes on, your characters should move on the Y axis (sorry for the math). You can actually plot it out if it helps you understand the rises and falls of your character’s arc.
  • Find what each character really needs to change. What is holding them back from achieving their goal? Why is it so important that they change? What would happen or who would they be if they don’t change? Alternatively, what can go wrong if they change or change for the worse? Remember that not every character arc is a positive one and sometimes readers need to see the characters fall to understand what is at stake and cheer for them more when they get back up.
  • Don’t make it sudden or pointless. Like anything else in your story you want to make the character’s advancement (or deterioration) have a cause and effect relationship. Something that happens in the story causes the character to have to change or at least consider how their actions are impacting others and their own life. A drunk who gets into a car accident and nearly kills their kid. A hero whose selfishness nearly causes the destruction of a village. Typically, the biggest shifts happen near the climax where the stakes are highest and the character has to make the biggest decisions.
  • Don’t make the character passive. Passive characters, in particular passive protagonists are unbearable. These are the ones that have the plot happen to them rather than contributing to the direction and outcome of the events. A character needs to take charge of their own destiny even if it’s a story where destiny is literally coming after them. Like I said before, some genres have more room for this than others. A high-stakes thriller that’s more plot driven has moments where the characters have to struggle to keep up with the events happening to them, but they should still be making the major decisions that ultimately lead to the conclusion. When the characters aren’t being decisive they can’t grow or change and their personal story stays flat and boring.
Bookish Weaknesses
  • Innocent Cinnamon roll characters 
  •  Sassy villains 
  •  Faery books (A Court of Thorns and Roses, The Cruel Prince, An Enchantment of Ravens) 
  •  Bad guy love interest 
  •  Badass female characters in dresses
  • Nerdy female characters
  • Adorable, awkward but still manly male characters
  • Witty humor
  • Humorous writing style (ex. Demons at Deadnight and Obsidian)
  • Kickass monsters 
  • Characters I have stuff in common with
  • Male character knows he’s end game for female character but said female character is fighting it and this just amuses male character 
  • Tomboy female character who still likes girly things
  • Mates
  • Beautiful covers
  • Characters with compassion
  • Main female characters with brown, curly hair
  • Books with maps
  • Magical worlds
  • An intense, passionate, earth shattering romantic love that the world has never seen
Romance in writing.

Romance.

I just don’t like romance novels, nor books whose plots focus heavily on it.

I hate when the synopsis paints romance as a main plot point, it turns me off reading the book entirely.

It shouldn’t, and I hate that it does. But I find the majority of romance (especially YA romance,) to be boring, bland and predictable.

Best book relationship I’ve ever read? Percy Jackson and Annabeth Chase from the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan. And the books are for middle schoolers.

That’s not to say romance in YA is bad, not at all. I’m sure there are some really well written relationships but past experience has put me off reading them.

I’ll get there one day. Any recommendations to ease me I guys?

people say you’re lucky to be in love with your best friend, but I think you’re luckier to love yourself.
—  musings from a book I’ll never write