xanthophyll

The leaf cycle:

During the spring and summer leaves serve as factories where most of the foods necessary for the tree’s growth are manufactured. The process, known as photosynthesis; takes place in the leaf in numerous cells containing chlorophyll, which gives the leaf its green colour. Along with the green pigment are yellow to orange pigments; carotenes and xanthophyll, however most of the year these colours are masked by great amounts of chlorophyll.

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 An asylum, Aphrodite’s arrival

Be bold, bog body, brown benches

Come caress carnivorous crux

Dare divinely, daunting denials

Entangled eclipse, emancipated ethereal 

Forsaken, forgiven, forgotten

Gossamer goddess, glowing Gilgamesh

Hands hailing hovering Halley

I intimately illuminate, intrigued!

June, July, justifiable joy!

Kinesthetic knowledge, kindred kittens

Losing limbs, lover’s lament

Moaning muscles, morning madness

Neverending, nowhere near

Open Oracle, oceanic ordeal

Propagated phloems, papilionaceous passion

Quivering queen, quacking quail

Red reeds, remember reality

Somber sonatas, sober syllables

Tame, taint, too tenderly

Under unpretentious Utopia

Voiceless vixen, venerated veneer

warming worm, warmest words

Xerophilous xylene, Xanthophylls xylems 

Youthful yoctoseconds, yattering your yellowwood

Zombification zwitterionic, zipping zigzaggers!

D C de Oliveira
02.11.2017

Fish food Nutrition break down

Just a rough guide on different brands and their standard tropical, goldfish and betta fish foods. I will also focus on pellets if available as they’re usually more viable and nutritious for your fish and cause less problems. that will allow you to compare and decide what one is best for you and your animals. I won’t be reviewing them directly as I’ve only used a handful of brands personally, but I will break down the nutrition regardless. Bolded are the really good ingredients not including vitamins

As a general rule you want to look at whole/natural protein over general meal as the first few ingredients, fewer grain based fillers and a balanced nutrition ratio for your fish. 

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anonymous asked:

Eremika where Hanji turns Mikasa into a kid and she wants her parents, but Eren and Armin are super over protective about her? <3 *follows bc of your fics *^* *

Thank you so much for following, I’m over the moon you liked my fics! I love this idea so much, but holy hell. This did not go as planned. Here it is, I guess…

“No, Eren, you can’t hold her like that.” 

“Why not? She’s fine. You’re fine, right? See, Armin? Fine. Everything is fine.” 

“You’re saying fine an awful lot.” 

“No offense, squad leader, but you don’t get to talk right now.” 

“None taken.” 

Armin folds his arms and sighs. Mikasa Ackerman, the Woman Worth 100 Soldiers, is hanging by her armpits from Eren’s outstretched hands, feet dangling way above the floor, clothes over sized and flopping from her shrunken frame. 

Mikasa Ackerman was fifteen years old when the day began. Now she’s seven, and they’re royally screwed. 

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4

In recognition of Earth Science Week, we bring you beautiful fall photos from around BLM Idaho with an explanation by Anne Halford, BLM Idaho Botanist, about why the leaves change color

Every autumn, cottonwood, quaking aspen and willow are transformed into colorful hues of gold, orange and russet. Before long, their leaves will fall and again become part of another cycle that feeds the soil. What causes this yearly cycle, and what determines which color the leaves turn? 

During spring and summer, leaves actively produce foods necessary for plant growth. This food-making process takes place in the many cells within the leaf. Within these cells are chloroplasts, which contain the chlorophyll pigments that are responsible for the green color of plants. The leaves also contain lesser amounts of other pigments, primarily xanthophylls (yellows) and carotenoids (yellows, oranges, and reds). 

Most of the year, these other pigments are masked by the greater amounts of chlorophyll in the leaves. But in fall, when changes in temperature and the period of daylight occur, the leaves stop their food-producing activity. Soon the chlorophyll begins to break down, the green color disappears, and the yellows, oranges and reds slowly begin to emerge, giving the leaves their fall splendor. 

The intensity of color is determined by the plant’s response to complex gradients of temperature and moisture. Fall weather conditions favoring formation of brilliant autumn color are warm, sunny days followed by cool nights with temperatures below 45F (7C). Sugar production increases during the daytime, but cool nights prevent movement of sugar from the leaves. 

From the sugars trapped in leaves, the pigment called anthocyanin is formed. When fall weather is consistently cloudy or rainy, and the nights warm, the leaves usually have less intense coloration. The smaller amount of sugar made during periods of less sunlight moves out of the leaves during the warm nights, reducing the conversion of excess sugars into pigments. 

Before the leaves can gracefully spin from their leafstalks, a special layer of cells develops and gradually severs the tissues that support the leaf. A small leaf scar is the only evidence that leaves once adorned these deciduous plants.

The leaf cycle:

During the spring and summer leaves serve as factories where most of the foods necessary for the tree’s growth are manufactured. The process, known as photosynthesis; takes place in the leaf in numerous cells containing chlorophyll, which gives the leaf its green colour. Along with the green pigment are yellow to orange pigments; carotenes and xanthophyll, however most of the year these colours are masked by great amounts of chlorophyll.

In autumn, because of the changes in daylight hours and changes in temperature the leaves stop photosynthesising and hence the chlorophyll breaks down. The green colour disappears, and the yellow and orange colours become visible. At the same time other chemical changes may occur, which form additional colours through the development of red anthocyanin pigments.

Eventually the tree sheds the leaves to save nutrients and prevent loss of water, the leaves then rot and return to the soil as organic matter.

The leaf in this photo is Manzanita leaf.

Photo courtesy of Flickr user robherr.

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Thank You for your comment, BLOG OF ROLEPLAY

Purple like that is actually very common in plants.  You do not usually see it because there is such a large amount of green chlorophyll.  Technically, the purple is Xanthophyll.  It is very efficient at using higher energy light for photosynthesis.  

Many paddle type cactus, especially at high altitudes, use enough that you see it strongly.  It is a very high survival adaptation for places like where I live.

The lovely fall colors?  Breaking down Xanthophyll in ordinary leaves.