x ray telescope

The dog name game (share a picture of what your dogs are named for) is going around Facebook, and I thought I would share here too. :)

Ryker is literally not named for anything. I just liked the way Ryker sounded. Lots of people think he is named after the Star Trek character though.

With Solstice, I wanted to start a space/weather theme with my dogs, and Solstice sounded like a pretty name for a pretty white dog. I think it’s pretty obvious what she is named for. Her registered name, Royal Autumn Twilight, also incorporates my favorite season as the winter solstice is the end of autumn.

Chandra is named for the Chandrasekhar Limit, which is the maximum stable mass of a white dwarf star before it collapses to a black hole or neutron star. Perhaps a bit prophetic now as she keeps growing larger…haha… There is also the Chandra X-ray telescope, which is a companion to Hubble, and this how I usually explain it to people since most people know about Hubble. :) Both of which are named after the astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar.

Astronomers discover cosmic double whammy

An international team of astronomers, including Lancaster’s David Sobral, has discovered a cosmic one-two punch never seen before.

Two of the most powerful phenomena in the Universe – a supermassive black hole and the collision of giant galaxy clusters – have combined to create a stupendous cosmic particle accelerator.

Keep reading

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The above images are spectacular representations of what Chandra X-Ray Telescope has brought to the astronomy table. The earth’s atmosphere filters out a great majority of x-rays, therefore, by having a telescope in orbit outside of the atmosphere, it gives astronomers a new perspective on the makeup of various celestial bodies. As seen in these images, high energy particles often emit high levels of x-rays which are typically invisible to us if we simply take a picture in the visible spectrum. Having an x-ray observatory like Chandra opens a brand new (beautiful) window to the universe.

Thanks to http://xiaolinhodown.tumblr.com/ and http://princessbowserkoopa.tumblr.com/ for inspiring me to create an OC for Supernoobs.

Tuesday (real name Amanda) Sanchez is a 12 year old sarcastic, moody Hispanic American goth girl who uses a pink battle ball which gives her vision based abilities like (heat, freeze, X-ray, night, laser, telescopic, future) She usually very emotionless and dull, and often times likes to creep people out with her gothly weirdness.

(NASA)  The Sun in X-rays from NuSTAR
Image Credit: NuSTAR, SDO, NASA

Why are the regions above sunspots so hot? Sunspots themselves are a bit cooler than the surrounding solar surface because the magnetic fields that create them reduce convective heating. It is therefore unusual that regions overhead – even much higher up in the Sun’s corona – can be hundreds of times hotter. To help find the cause, NASA directed the Earth-orbiting Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite to point its very sensitive X-ray telescope at the Sun. Featured above is the Sun in ultraviolet light, shown in a red hue as taken by the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Superimposed in false-colored green and blue is emission above sunspots detected by NuSTAR in different bands of high-energy X-rays, highlighting regions of extremely high temperature. Clues about the Sun’s atmospheric heating mechanisms may not only come from this initial image, but future NuSTAR images aimed at finding hypothesized nanoflares, brief bursts of energy that may drive the unusual heating.

Massive Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 2841

Image Credit: Hubble, Subaru; Composition & Copyright: Roberto Colombari

Explanation: It is one of the more massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms. In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

Earlier this week, we looked out to the far reaches of the solar system with humanity’s first closeup view of Pluto. Now, we turn our attention inward, to the center of our neighborhood. Sun researchers have layered three images from different telescopes to show our sun in all of its powerful glory.

High-energy X-rays recorded by NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) are in blue. Low-energy X-rays captured by Japan’s Hinode spacecraft are in green. Extreme ultraviolet light seen by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory is in yellow and red. All three layers were captured around the same time on April 29.

All the colors present in the image come from material at or near the sun’s surface that are heated to several million degrees, with the blue-white areas indicating the most energetic areas. Learn more here. 

“We can see a few active regions on the sun in this view,” said Iain Hannah of the University of Glasgow in Scotland. “Our sun is quieting down in its activity cycle, but still has a couple of years before it reaches a minimum.”

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Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 4945 : Large spiral galaxy NGC 4945 is seen edge-on near the center of this cosmic galaxy portrait. In fact, NGC 4945 is almost the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Its own dusty disk, young blue star clusters, and pink star forming regions standout in the sharp, colorful telescopic image. About 13 million light-years distant toward the expansive southern constellation Centaurus, NGC 4945 is only about six times farther away than Andromeda, the nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way. Though the galaxy’s central region is largely hidden from view for optical telescopes, X-ray and infrared observations indicate significant high energy emission and star formation in the core of NGC 4945. Its obscured but active nucleus qualifies the gorgeous island universe as a Seyfert galaxy and home to a central supermassive black hole. via NASA

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It is one of the most massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms. In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

Object Names: NGC 2841

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Hubble Space Telescope, Subaru Telescope

Composition And Copyright: Roberto Colombari

Time And Space

The Sun in X-rays from NuSTAR

Why are the regions above sunspots so hot? Sunspots themselves are a bit cooler than the surrounding solar surface because the magnetic fields that create them reduce convective heating. It is therefore unusual that regions overhead – even much higher up in the Sun’s corona – can be hundreds of times hotter. To help find the cause, NASA directed the Earth-orbiting Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite to point its very sensitive X-ray telescope at the Sun. Featured above is the Sun in ultraviolet light, shown in a red hue as taken by the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Superimposed in false-colored green and blue is emission above sunspots detected by NuSTAR in different bands of high-energy X-rays, highlighting regions of extremely high temperature. Clues about the Sun’s atmospheric heating mechanisms may not only come from this initial image, but future NuSTAR images aimed at finding hypothesized nanoflares, brief bursts of energy that may drive the unusual heating.

Image credit: NuSTAR, SDO, NASA

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Smasher (Hector Chang)   //   Image Comics

As Visionary Hector had the superhuman abilities related to his eyesight, which include laser vision, X-ray vision, and telescopic vision. His laser vision is used as an offensive weapon, and can be used to neutralize human opponents, and large objects such as armored tanks, though unlike his father’s laser blasts, 

Visionary’s are yellow instead of red. His x-ray vision allows him to see through solid objects. His telescopic vision allows him to see great distances.The upper limits of each of these powers is not yet been revealed. (X)

Two cosmic structures show evidence for a remarkable change in behavior of a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy. Using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers are piecing together clues from a cosmic “blob” and a gas bubble that could be a new way to probe the past activity of a giant black hole and its effect on its host galaxy.

The Green Blob, a renowned cosmic structure also called “Hanny’s Voorwerp” (which means “Hanny’s object” in Dutch), is located about 650 million light years from Earth. This object was discovered in 2007 by Hanny van Arkel, at the time a school teacher, as part of the citizen science project called Galaxy Zoo.

Astronomers think that a blast of ultraviolet and X-radiation produced by a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy IC 2497 (only 200,000 light years away) excited the oxygen atoms in a gas cloud, giving the Green Blob its emerald glow. At present the black hole is growing slowly and not producing nearly enough radiation to cause such a glow.

However, the distance of the Green Blob from IC 2497 is large enough that we may be observing a delayed response, or an echo of past activity, from a rapidly growing black hole. Such a black hole would produce copious amounts of radiation from infalling material, categorizing it as a “quasar.”

If the black hole was growing at a much higher rate in the past and then slowed down dramatically in the past 200,000 years, the glow of the Green Blob could be consistent with the present low activity of the black hole. In this scenario, the blob would become much dimmer in the distant future, as reduced ultraviolet and X-radiation levels from the faded quasar finally reach the cloud.

In this new composite image of IC 2497 (top object) and the Green Blob (bottom), X-rays from Chandra are purple and optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope are red, green, and blue.

New observations with Chandra show that the black hole is still producing large amounts of energy even though it is no longer generating intense radiation as a quasar. The evidence for this change in the black hole’s activity comes from hot gas in the center of IC 2497 detected in a long exposure by Chandra. The center of the X-ray emission shows cooler gas, which astronomers interpret as a large bubble in the gas.

Astronomers suspect this bubble may have been created when a pair of jets from the black hole blew away the hot gas. In this scenario, the energy produced by the supermassive black hole has changed from that of a quasar, when energy is radiated in a broad beam, to more concentrated output in the form of collimated jets of particles and consistent with the observed radio emission in this source.

Such changes in behavior from strong radiation to strong outflow are seen in stellar-mass black holes that weigh about ten times that of the Sun, taking place over only a few weeks. The much higher mass of the black hole in IC 2497 results in much slower changes over many thousands of years.

The citizen and professional scientists of the Galaxy Zoo project have continued to hunt for objects like the Green Blob. Many smaller versions of the Green Blob have been found (dubbed “Voorwerpjes” or “little objects” in Dutch.) These latest results from Chandra suggest that fading quasars identified as Voorwerpjes are good places to search for examples of supermassive black holes affecting their surroundings.

Object Names: IC 2497, Hanny's  Voorwerp

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/ETH Zurich/L. Sartori et al, Optical: NASA/STScI

Time And Space

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Better pics later, but say hello to Chandra! Dizzy Stellar Dynamics from Dizzy Dogs and named for the astrophysicist Chandrasekhar, Chandra x-ray telescope, etc. First nickname is Arya Underfoot because that’s where she always is. :P

As I said before, she’s a screamer! Quite a voice on this one, haha. She’s more people-oriented than her sable sister was, which has its plusses (she’s very interested in us and wants to be with us) and minuses (will have to do a lot of work on separation anxiety. She follows me everywhere and screams if we are separated at all). She’s done pretty well on this busy day, several hours on a plane and then straight down to an agility trial.

Tried not to overwhelm her with training on top of everything, but we did start working on some stuff and she took it in stride. Offered focus, hand touches, collar grabs, paw handling, waiting politely instead of mauling the crate door to come out, playing with toys and leashes. Puppies tend to remind you of how much they don’t know, like just eating a treat from your hand without dropping it! Or not screaming when you step away for two seconds, haha.

So far Ryker and Solstice are doing ok. Lots of rewards and careful management for co-existing. Solstice seems to be warming up and even tried to play with Chandra, though we’ll be limiting their play until she’s a bit larger and less breakable. :P Ryker is interested when I’m holding her, but can’t be trusted if she approaches him on the ground. We’ll get there!

p.s. we had three “black lab!” comments before we even left the airport, so that’s begun XD

MODERN SUPER-PARENTING

“ But why, Dad, why?! ”

“  You know why, son.  You’re out of control!  Giving that Kryptonian Supernova Wedgie to Lex Luthor, Jr.  You’re lucky his father is a mad genius and will figure out how to fix his spine.  Burning ‘Bat-Dork Lives Here’ in the lawn of Wayne Manor with your heat vision.  You know how old Alfred is?  He can’t be out in the heat with a rake and grass seed fixing that. 

And I’m not stupid, I know why you spend so much time in near-orbit over Paradise Island.  You’re at that age, and Telescopic X-Ray Vision is too great a temptation: I was a Superboy once, too.  There isn’t a birthmark or mole in Smallville I don’t know about.  ”

“ And you’re punishing me for the SAME THING? ”

“ But I wasn’t tweeting that information to the whole world!  Or taking selfies with Catwoman’s stolen jewels and unmentionables draped over your head!  How did you think that made the Bat-Twins feel?  They’re already in therapy because Selina can’t give up crime.  Would it be funny if your friend Atom, Jr. went swimming in your mother’s underwear drawer and took pictures?  You Teen Titans opened up a Boom Tube to Apokolips just to take turns mooning Darkseid and made a Vine out of it! ”

“ Seriously?!  I have super-hearing!  I HEARD you and Uncle Hal and Uncle Barry cracking up!   We’re just kids!  We were just fooling around! ”

“  That’s the problem: you narcissistic super-kids today don’t know how to keep your youthful indiscretions discrete.  It’s not that you get up to any less shenanigans than we did, you just don’t know how to keep your fat mouths shut and your fingers off the record button.  It’s cool now, but the Internet never forgets.  Brainiac built it that way, to be a permanent repository of the catalogued embarrassment of the entire human race.  There’s some things you just remember fondly and chuckle about around the Justice League meeting table with your friends, not digitally immortalize for everyone to throw in your face and judge you for years later. ”

“ I-I promise, Dad, I’ll never do it again.  Don’t take away my powers!  ”

“ Well … okay.  But you’re not completely off the hook. ”

“  Wait, Dad.  What are you doing with that Red Kryptonite? ”

“ Well, son, I’ve specifically altered the atomic weight of this sample of Red K so that it’s random transformative powers aren’t so random: exposure to this will turn you into a giant, delusional, bald-headed, diaper-wearing telepathic super-ape with extremely poor impulse control for 48 hours, then it’ll wear off. Your Teen Titan buddies can help babysit you until then.  But don’t worry, I’ve borrowed a collection of Uncle Jimmy’s cameras, and I’ll be close by.  You can follow all your misadventures later on Instagram. ”

“  Why don’t you just send me to the Phantom Zone and be done with it.  The Internet is right: you are a jerk. ”

Curt Swan & Murphy Anderson, August 1970

I’ve been re-reading the Piraka novel saga a lot lately, and I noticed something: each Piraka has two abilities, one vision-based and another unrelated power. Thok had spellbinder vision and animating objects, Reidak had infrared/thermal vision and adaptation to defeat, Hakann had heat vision and mental blasts, Avak had telescopic/X-Ray vision and prison creation, Vezok had impact vision and power absorption, and Zaktan had laser vision and… What? I don’t think his protodite form should count, as A: it was granted by accident and B: it’s more a physical trait than a mental ability, like the others. So what is Zaktan’s second power? Perhaps his power WAS his ability to turn into protodites, and TSO’s eye beams were the catalyst for Zaktan’s power activating. Maybe he already had a power, but his transformation rendered him unable to use it. Or maybe… Maybe Zaktan still has that second power of his, and for whatever reason, he’s kept it hidden. That’s a pretty Zaktan thing to do.