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The Unfinished Portrait- narrated by Stephen Fry: 

Many of our places were home to, and shaped by, people who challenged conventional ideas of gender and sexuality. Fifty years after the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality, we’re exploring our LGBTQ heritage with a programme called Prejudice and Pride.


Robert Wyndham Ketton-Cremer – the last Squire of Felbrigg – was known as a shy, gentle, unmarried man who restored his exquisite ancestral home and bequeathed it to the nation.

Until now, official accounts of Robert’s life have offered only a partial story and neglected to acknowledge what was widely accepted by those who knew him, preferring instead to describe him as ‘the bachelor squire’…or ‘not one for the ladies’.

This film offers a new way of seeing Robert and his fascinating life.

Tips and Ideas for Writing Post-Apocolypse

Writing post-apocalypse/dystopian future can actually open a large range of possibilities and original ideas but there are some things we should try to keep in mind. The problem with this genre is that is a heavily research-based genre, it requires a lot of information so a lot of things can slip up or be forgotten.

Limits of the Body - This is something that seems to be largely forgotten unless in extreme situations. Yes, humans are tough, but they are also weak. We have that balance of nature within us. People can keep going whilst in a lot of pain, but something like a headache could knock them senseless. I knew someone who got shot in the leg and ran three miles because he thought he had been hit by the brick. The second he realised he had actually been shot and was safe to do so, he collapsed in pain. Quickly establish what your characters can and cannot do.

Children - Children are more robust than so many people give them credit for, they wouldn’t make it to adulthood otherwise. Children are emotionally stronger than they are physically but many children have a lot more endurance for their size than adults because they have to keep up with adults. Two good examples are The Road by Cormac McCarthy and Lord of the Flies by William Golding.

Hygiene - Namely with periods and stuff. It is hard work keeping the body clean, so personal hygiene will be poor but people tend to stop caring at a point when they realise how hard it is to maintain. A lot of people would revert to old fashioned methods of vagina health as well, so people would use reusable cloth or diva cups. The only book I know of that covers this is The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey.

Simple Killers - More people died of the Spanish flu than in the First World War (source). It is surprising how often it is “little things” that kill people off. An emotional death does not have to be all that dramatic, no bloody death or major killer. Something as simple as a small cut that festered will kill someone if not treated correctly. An asthma attack, diabetes, things we see as treatable would make quick work of us without medical aid. Also most deaths are really simple and sudden.

World Limitations - What is this obsession with guns and everything happening in the summer and unlimited cans of food? No, let’s be honest, none of these are realistic. Guns will not last, can goods will be snatched up by the shop loads, most natural disasters will happen in spring or autumn. Remember to do the key thing, make your world real and people are more likely to believe it.

Take a Page - Who are most renowned for their post-apocalyptic stories? British pre-1950s authors. Why? Their worlds are real, the possibilities of what could happen in those worlds are real. Some where and still are scarily accurate, they looked at the current and possible state of things, creating a world too similar to our own. Great examples like 1984 by George Orwell, The Death of Grass by John Christopher, The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham, Soylent Green and the Mad Max Series.

Tales from the stage door

Sorry for the long post! So, here they are - some of the pics I took of David at the stage door at The Wyndham’s Theatre after his 2. and 3. performance of Don Juan in Soho (which you should totally go watch!). Some are better than others, but they are all magnificent because, well - it’s David Tennant! You are welcome to reblog, share, save or whatever you want - just don’t repost, please :-)

18-03-2017:

20-03-2017:

Bonus, because I know some of you will appreciate it:


HAPPY TENNANT TUESDAY!!!

There is more underneath the glass and steel of Hong Kong

When it comes to Hong Kong as a travel destination, scenes of the hustle and bustle, all kinds of cuisine and hundreds of shopping complexes probably flood your mind in a blink. No we are not going into the obvious beauty of the city. We are here to unravel the mesmerizing gem of the city’s cultural diversity. Let us freshen your vision and mind with some colorful hues!

HKwalls

For those who want to explore the city from an unconventional perspective, check out the HKwalls! For four years in a row, HKwalls has been making efforts to strengthen the link between art and the public space. Last year, HKwalls took place in Sham Shui Po, one of the earliest developed areas in Hong Kong. The mixed land uses and history has given the district a distinct character, making it an ideal area for the annual street arts celebrations. The festival featured 40 art pieces created by artists from 17 countries, 42 workshops, 3 free film screenings and a pop-up print exhibition.

This year HKwalls reignites the partnership with Vans as part of the Hong Kong Arts Month in Wong Chuk Hang. Unlike other events during the month, there are scattered happenings for the public to stumble upon.  Though Wong Chuk Hang may be a little far from the city centre, it is chosen for a reason. While the art and creative community has been blossoming in the industrial district, the mural art pieces and interactive programs would perfectly compliment the growth. Just remember to have your camera ready!

Feeling revitalized now? Let’s dig deeper into the city’s cultural matrix, here is our recommended guide for you.

Old Town Central

Here we go a compact experience in the culturally diverse city!

Old Town Central (OTC) refers to the rectangular shaped neighbourhood in Central bounded by Wyndham Street, Caine Road, Possession Street, Queen’s Road Central and Hollywood Road. A miniature of the big city, it hosts many must-go including heritage sites, landmarks, historic architecture, religious buildings, designer boutiques, local shops, dining and entertainment outlets. It mirrors the transition of Hong Kong from a fishing village to a British colony to a metropolitan city throughout the decades.

Possession Street

The story of modern Hong Kong began at Possession Street in 1841, where the British soldiers landed and the colonial governance commenced.  Fast forward to 176 years later, it is now the Hollywood Road Park, a Chinese-style garden.  Still, you can find a mix of nostalgic and modern shops at Possession Street.

POHO

Climb a few staircases to POHO; fill yourself with the artsy air. Surrounded by Po Hing Fong including Tai Ping Shan Street, Po Hing Street, Tung Street, Sai Street, and Upper Station Street, the up-and-coming neighbourhood is analogous to Hong Kong’s hipster village with plenty cafes, quirky boutiques and art galleries.

YMCA Bridges Street Centre & Ladder Street

You will find YMCA Bridges Street Centre and Ladder Street at the east of OTC. Constructed in 1918, the YMCA Bridges Street Centre is an architectural epitome displaying a crossover between Chinese green glazed tiled roofs and Chicago School style. Ladder Street, a Grade 1 historical building, which is made entirely of stone steps, connects Queen’s Road Central all the way uphill to Hollywood Road and Caine Road.

Man Mo Temple

At the corner of Ladder Street, Man Mo Temple is a masterpiece of long-lost traditional Chinese architectural craftsmanship. It would certainly take your breath away the moment you step in. The temple was built for Gods worshipping and as “Kung Sor” where community issues were discussed and resolved.

PMQ

Go along Hollywood Road and you will arrive at PMQ, the Police Married Quarters. It has been revitalized as a creative hub where over 100 shops, pop-up stores, design studios and restaurants are nested. The mission of PMQ is to nurture local designers, provide a place for organizing exhibits and for visitors to have a taste of creative lifestyle. With this in mind, you cannot miss this place from your to-go list in Hong Kong.

Gough Street and Kau U Fong

Also known as NOHO, there is a great deal of independent boutiques and contemporary art galleries awaiting your discovery; cafes and old-style dai pai dong (cooked food stalls) ready to fill you up. Be sure to spare some time and belly for them!

Pak Tsz Lane Park

Pak Tsz Lane Park, located at a quiet square behind Aberdeen Street, Hollywood Road, Gage Street and Peel Street, is a park featuring a monument in memory of anti-Qing Dynasty activities in the late 19th century by revolutionaries from Furen Wenshe and Xing Zhong Hui. Enlighten yourself with some knowledge on Hong Kong’s role in overthrowing the monarchy in China.

Hollywood Road

One of the oldest built in 1844, Hollywood Road has evolved into a renowned art hub, accommodating numerous contemporary art galleries, antique shops and boutiques. Get your art and shopping fix here and you won’t be disappointed.

Tai Kwun

At the junction of Old Baileys Street and Hollywood Road stands a gorgeous colonial-style establishment – Tai Kwun, or “big station” in Chinese. That was how the Chinese used to colloquially refer to the former law enforcement complex. Initially where the Central Police Station, Central Magistracy and Victoria Prison were, it is now under transformation into the next talk-of-the-town hub of heritage, arts and leisure. Stay tuned!

Pottinger Street

Named after Hong Kong’s first governor, Pottinger Street is made of uneven slabs of cobblestone, and thus given the name “Stone Slab Street”. If you need ideas for your costumes and props to Halloween celebrations or themed parties, look no further, you can find everything here.

Lyndhurst Terrace

Lyndhurst Terrace is another featured spot of the Dr Sun Yat-sen Historical Trail. The old Xing Yan Lou Western Restaurant was one of the secretive bases where Dr. Sun Yat-sen and his comrades meet as well as a refuge for overseas revolutionaries during the First Guangzhou Uprising in 1895. You may be hit by some shiok buttery aroma and it probably comes from Tai Cheong Bakery, renowned for “the best egg tarts in the world” hailed by the last British governor Chris Patten.

This content was produced in partnership with Hong Kong Tourism Board.

9

Here you go! The few decent pictures I got of David Tennant at the stage door on June 8th (top pic) and 9th 2017 after Don Juan in Soho. Some of these are blurry, but I’ve tried to do some modifications :-) Fell free to reblog, but please do not repost. Anyway - enjoy the lovely, amazing, precious, kind and wonderful human that is David Tennant!

Happy Tennant Tuesday!

As some of you know, I’m very close to 1000 followers - and I’ve promised you a never before posted picture of David Tennant when I reach that follower milestone. Unfortunately I’ve lost followers the last couple of days and I’ve recieved som anon hate (which I refuse to engage in, bc I’m not that kind of person)

All this has made me think: Am I here on Tumblr to gain lots of followers, likes and all that? HELL NO! Am I here on Tumblr to share my love for David Tennant and spread some DT love? OH YES! Therefore, I’ve decided to post the picture today!

So, without further ado, here you go:

I don’t know why, but I really just love this pic… 

It’s from March 2017 after a Don Juan in Soho performance at Wyndham’s Theatre in London. 

I’ve taken it myself and originally, my dear friend Anja is also in the photo - but she doesn’t like the way she looks in it, so I promised to cut her out :-) But hey, we must admit that David also looks pretty damn fine on his own ;-)

Happy Tennant Tuesday everyone!