“A near miss on the carrier Bunker Hill (CV-17) during an attack by Japanese aircraft off the Mariana Islands on 19 June 1944. Image(s) part of a scrapbook assembled by Commander Francis N. Gilreath during his service as Flag Secretary and Aide to Rear Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery.”

(National Museum of Naval Aviation: NNAM.1987.096.001.046)

My Russian Spy son…(Abram Orlov)

Hes fluent in german, and obviously russian, and English. HE IS really quiet, and really relaxed all the time. Im talking even when hes angry you wouldn’t know it. He usually only speaks when its relevant or to bully Aldrik. (They aren’t on good terms) Hes very agile, chubby, and LOVES turtle necks a bunch. Do not…let him baby sit your kids they’ll come home ready to fight in the war 😂. He hides a bunch of snacks in his sweaters like all the time. And he can go from giving you a bear hug one second to chopping your hand off the next while still remaining that calm face. His eyes are usually always closed? Are they closed? He somehow sees. Cause logic. (I literally copy and pasted all this from my Instagram xD)

2

Abram intimidating Aldrik (theyre not on good terms)

Then theres a photo bombing Freddy Falser (character on the right)

Fred: (American Medic)
Abram: (Russian Spy)
Aldrik: (Oberfuhrer)

More on Fred: i decided to throw Freddy into my pile of WWII characters, Hes known as Freddy Falser hes a terrible medic but he’ll always lie and tell you you’re gonna be fine. He actually…lies about almost everything. His brother Davis was a pilot but he slipped into a coma after a little accident occurred.

Maybe it’s time to stop using Nazis as bad guys.

Now hear me out. I’m not saying we shouldn’t make any more World War II movies. And I’m not saying we can’t have movies that portray Nazis in the villainous role they require, earned, and deserve. All I’m saying is that maybe we shouldn’t, for a while.

Nazis have essentially become the titular Alien from the Alien movies. We’ve seen it so many times, its portrayal growing more and more reductive with each installment, that we’ve reached the point where we’re no longer afraid of it. The Alien isn’t scary anymore. Once you drag the monster out of the shadows of your bedroom, shine a bright light on it, and make it dance, you forget what it feels like to be sitting alone in the dark with it watching you from a distorted mass of shapes that project nothing but malice and dread despite never fully congealing into a recognizable figure.

Today, we take for granted the amount of time it took the majority of the world to realize that. Many countries, the United States included, didn’t see Nazis as the overt monsters nearly a century of hindsight has taught us they were all along. Nazism was vogue, even in America, where the well-educated and well-moneyed would spend evenings extolling the virtues of eugenics, and suggesting appeasement was the way to deal with Hitler, because he “really didn’t seem that bad.”

Most people reacted with incredulous disbelief at the rumors of death camps, prompting people to actually break in to camps to collect evidence, because yes, “pics or it didn’t happen” absolutely extended to the Holocaust. We had to be convinced that Nazis were truly evil, and decades of casting them as cartoonish villains in popular culture has softened their evil to the point where it’s almost become abstracted. When watching Inglourious Basterds, it’s easy to forget to connect the bizarrely affable Hans Landa to this (holy hell graphic and disturbing) image of a wheelbarrow full of dead Jewish children, and fucking nobody is thinking about that real, soul-crushing shit while they’re waiting for Nazi Zombies to load.

Why We’ve All Forgotten How Evil The Nazis Really Were

During World War II, there was a large push for recruitment of some of the best art students across the country to join the United States Army.  They formed a “deception unit”, or a “ghost army” that appeared to look like a huge mass of soldiers, tanks, trucks and artillery.  However, it was all smoke and mirrors, consisting of inflatable tanks, sound design, and clever applications of fake tank tracks overnight.  Actors also met in pubs, planting false information.  This distracted the enemy from the real troops who were gathering.

To learn more about this fascinating undertaking, which was only de-classified fairly recently, check out the podcast on the subject from 99% Invisible.  (Photo from Retronaut/Mashable, England, c. 1939) 

3

WW2 Veteran Comes out as Transgender aged 90

A WW2 veteran has come out as transgender at the age of 90 and is happy to finally be receiving female hormone treatment.

Patricia Davies says she knew since the age of three that she was a woman but lived in fear of how people would react for decades until doctors changed her medical records to “female” last year.

Even though she had opened up to her late wife about her feelings in 1987, who bought her jewelry and dresses to wear in secret, she remained living as Peter after receiving abuse from people in the street and fearing “electric shock treatment”.

The retired industrial photographer, who served in the army between April 1945-1948, has a distant aunt who once lived to 104 years old so hopes she has “similar genes” to keep her going so she can now enjoy life as a woman.

Patricia, from a village in Leicestershire, said: “It feels like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders. I was living a lie.”

“I have been keeping quiet. I have slowly started to tell some of my neighbors. Everybody said ‘don’t worry, as long as you’re happy.”

“I’ve known I was transgender since I was three-years-old.”

“I have always been attracted to women but not in a sexual way. I’m not gay. My attraction to women was that I wanted to be like them. I would have liked to be like the pin-ups.”

“I was never totally unhappy. I always made the most of things and looked on the bright side of things. I’ve always had a wicked sense of humor.”

“Because of the general hostility of people I kept quiet. It wasn’t until recently that I felt safe to come out and I felt an overwhelming desire that I wanted to break free. So I came out and I’ve not regretted it.”

Patricia served in the army from April 1945 until April 1948, leaving when she was 21 and getting married only a few months later.

During her time in the armed forces, she served in the Far East, India, East Africa and Palestine.

Patricia said: “You took your life in your hands in the army. I lost a couple of mates and had a close shave myself.”

“I had to keep my mouth shut about being transgender, you couldn’t flaunt that as that would have been a disaster.”

“Transgender wasn’t really known in those days. I would have been classed as homosexual, which would have caused problems in the army. I would have ended up in prison. But I got through it.”

“But it was alright overall and I feel quite proud having served during the war and having done military service, in particular during the trouble in Palestine.”

“Perhaps Hitler got news I had joined in April 1945 and gave up. That’s what I like to think.”

“I feel quite relieved, quite happy. [The best thing about coming out] is being accepted as a woman. That has been something I’ve wanted all of my life.”

“If people don’t like what they see then I don’t care but no one seems to be causing me any trouble. Nobody questions it though. Nobody seems to bat an eyelid, they accept me as I am.”

“I’ve been made most welcome in the societies. I think people will benefit from being educated on this a bit more.”