wwat:peru

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INCA INGENUITY IN THE ANDES:

NESTLED deep in the Andes, the former Inca capital city of Cusco stands at 11,152 feet (3,399 m) above sea level. It is a destination for tourists from around the world who ascend the treacherous mountainside roads to make their pilgrimage to one of the modern wonders of the world, Machu Picchu. While it is best known for its proximity to the ancient city, there is a wealth of other sites in and around Cusco that still have intact remnants of the region’s Inca past.

The Inca Empire, known to themselves as Tiwantinsuyo, began in the early 15th century and lasted until the Spanish conquest. It was centered on the capital, Cusco, which continues to be an important city in Peru.

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Article and photos © by Caroline Cervera on AHE

Machu Picchu was the residence of Incan emperor Pachacútec, and a religious temple. It was considered one of the three sacred(er) peaks of the empire. When inhabited historians believe Machu Picchu’s population was somewhere around 300 to 1,000 Incas. According to current scholarship, all the residents were considered elites. They were supported by farming the terraces which surround the village and helped hold up some of the houses.

Why are these 1000-year-old dogs buried under the Lima zoo?

LIMA—Karina Venegas Gutiérrez was digging between the zebra and the hippo pens at the Parque de las Leyendas zoo here when she uncovered something strange. Like much of Peru’s capital city, the zoo is built atop layers of settlements that stretch back millennia. Venegas Gutiérrez, an archaeologist who works at the zoo, is charged with excavating that history. She has found scores of buildings and artifacts, and even a few human mummies. But in 2012, she unearthed something she still can’t quite explain: the remains of more than 100 dogs, resting alongside a similar number of humans. The unusual discovery may help archaeologists understand the roles of dogs in pre-Columbian Peru—including their potentially important role as sacrificial victims.

During the World Congress on Mummy Studies here last week, Venegas Gutiérrez led a tour of the site for several scientists (and one curious journalist). As a particularly angry-sounding zebra bellowed nearby, she discussed her still puzzling find. Over the course of their excavation, she and her team unearthed the skulls of 126 humans and 128 dogs. Read more.

Tens of Thousands March in Peru Against Gender Violence

LIMA, Peru — More than 50,000 people marched in Peru’s capital and eight other cities on Saturday to protest violence against woman and what they say is the indifference of the judicial system.

Officials said the size of the protest against gender violence was unprecedented in Peru and followed several recent high-profile cases in which male perpetrators were given what women’s groups said were too-lenient sentences. The march in Lima ended at the palace of justice.

“Today, the 13th of August, is a historic day for this country because it represents a breaking point and the start of a new culture to eradicate the marginalization that women have been suffering, especially with violence,” said Victor Ticona, president of Peru’s judicial system.

Ticona said that a commission of judges would receive representatives of the protesters.

Newly inaugurated President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski took part in the march along with first lady Nancy Lange.

“What we don’t want in Peru is violence against anyone, but especially against women and children,” he said.

Earlier in the day, Kuczynski said his government is “going to ask for facilities for women to denounce violence because abuse flourishes in an environment where complaints cannot be made and the blows are absorbed in silence — and this is not how it should be.”

Peru’s march follows similar protests against gender violence in other Latin American countries, including Argentina and Brazil, held under the slogan #NiUnaMenos — #NotOneLess.

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSAUG. 13, 2016, 11:45 P.M. E.D.T.

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The fortress of Kuelap or Cuélap (Chachapoyas, Amazonas, Perú), is a walled city associated with the Chachapoyas culture built in 6th century AD. It consists of more than four hundred buildings surrounded by massive exterior stone walls. The complex is situated on a ridge overlooking the Utcubamba Valley in northern Peru and roughly 600 meters long and 110 meters wide. It could have been built to defend against the Huari or others, but evidence of hostile groups at the site is minimal.

Judging from its sheer size, Kuelap’s construction required considerable effort, rivaling or surpassing in size other archaeological structures in the Americas. The structure is almost 600 metres in length and its walls rise up to 19 metres in height.

There are multiple levels or platforms within the complex. Because of its extension, these flat elevations support about 400 constructions, most of them cylindrical. Of them, only bases remain. In some cases, there are decorated walls with friezes of symbolic content that, in general, seem to evoke eyes and birds that take the form of a letter V in a chain.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuelap