ww photos

5

Okaeri(?), Dazai-san~

My Dazai nendo arrived, so I had to take pictures!! 😭👌

A preview for @unknownlandzine! I’m so incredibly happy I got in, the project has been so much fun ;;

Parka the beaver is Parks Canada’s mascot 🍁( ´◒` )🍁 

Please consider to get yourself a copy! Pre-orders open tomorrow~ 

6

I like my body and my skin, and I feel comfortable with my own strength and knowledge. My experiences are invaluable, and knowing what I know now makes life a real fun place to navigate. There are moments when looking at the little arms and face of my kid, and the surge of love I feel almost takes my breath away. Like everyone, I suffer the blows, loss and pain that come with experience, but I make it a point to talk through them with my friends, my therapist and my wise women, and that helps. Truly. Can I say it? Being age 50 is awesome!

Nagasaki after the atomic bomb

At 11:02 a.m. on Aug. 9, 1945, the bomb, nicknamed “Fat Man,” exploded approximately 500 meters above Nagasaki, Japan. It instantly killed an estimated 70,000 of the city’s population. Three days earlier, on Aug. 6, 1945, an American B-29 Superfortress bomber called Enola Gay dropped a uranium-235 bomb on Hiroshima, eventually killing at least 140,000 people. It was the first and only time nuclear weapons have been used. Their destructive power was unprecedented, incinerating buildings and people and leaving lifelong scars on survivors, not just physical but also psychological, and on the cities themselves. Days later, World War II was over.

On the 72nd anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Nagasaki and amid growing tension between Washington and North Korea, here’s a look back at that fateful event. (AP/Getty images)

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Destroyed Urakami Cathedral is see just after the atomic bomb was dropped in Aug. 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. (Photo: Yasuo Tomishige/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

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Almost nothing remained of this district in Nagasaki, Japan, as the result of the atomic bomb attack. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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Four months after the U.S. atomic bombing of Nagasaki, an unidentified person stands beside a seared tree amid ruins and rubble, Nagasaki, Japan, Dec. 9, 1945. (Photo: Alfred Eisenstaedt/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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Keloids cover the back of a survivor of the Nagasaki atomic bomb. Keloids are dense, fibrous growths that grow over scar tissue. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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The remains of Mitsubishi steel plant, which was 1 ½ miles from where the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, Japan. (Photo: Bernard Hoffman/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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A female Nagasaki atomic bomb victim receives a treatment at Shin Kozen Elementary School in Aug. 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. (Photo: Yasuo Tomishige/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

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Former business district of Nagasaki in Sept. 1945 where 18,000 hotels, office buildings and homes once stood before the total devastation of the U.S. atomic bomb dropped a month earlier. (Photo: Bernard Hoffman/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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Remains of trolley car in foreground, 2 ½ miles from where the U.S.dropped an atomic bomb in Nagasaki, 1945 (Photo: Bernard Hoffman/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

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A small atomic bomb survivor receives a treatment at temporary hospital set at Shin Kozen Elementary School on Sept. 23, 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. (Photo: Yasuo Tomishige/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

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Completely destroyed Urakami Cathedral is seen, 500 meters from the epicenter of Nagasaki atomic bomb, in Aug. 1945 in Japan. (Photo: Eiichi Matsumoto/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

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Lieutenant Colonel Kermit Beahan, who dropped an atomic Bomb in Nagasaki, is shown in Chicago Ill., on Sept. 19, 1945. (Photo: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

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Devastation left after an atomic bomb exploded over Nagasaki, Japan, on Aug. 9 1945. No precise date is given for the photo, which was taken not long after the explosion. (Photo: U.S. Signal Corps/AP)

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The hospital at Nagasaki Medical College, located only 800 meters from ground zero, was destroyed when the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city at the end of World War II on Aug. 9. 1945. Only the reinforced concrete buildings remain standing. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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This is the type of atomic bomb exploded over Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II, the Atomic Energy Commission and Defense Department said in releasing this photo in Washington, Dec. 6, 1960. The weapon, known as the ‘Fat Man’ type, is 60 inches in diameter and 128 inches long. The second nuclear weapon to be detonated, it weighed about 10,000 pounds and had a yield equivalent to approximately 20,000 tons of high explosive. (Photo: AP)

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August 1945 damage from the atomic bombing of the Japanese City of Nagasaki at the end of world war two. (Photo: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

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A Japanese civilian pushes his loaded bike down a path which has been cleared of the rubble. On either side of the path debris, twisted metal, and gnared tree stumps fill the area in Nagasaki on Sept. 13, 1945. This is in the center of the devasted area. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

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The crew of the United States Army Air Forces B-29 Superfortress ‘Bockscar’, which dropped the atomic bomb ‘Fat Man’ on the Japanese city of Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945. Front row, left to right: flight engineer John D. Kuharek, gunner and assistant flight engineer Ray Gallagher, tail gunner Albert Dehart, radio operator Abe Spitzer, unknown. Back row, left to right: bombardier Raymond ‘Kermit’ Beahan, navigator James Van Pelt, co-pilot Charles Donald Albury, co-pilot Fred Olivi and pilot Major General Charles W. Sweeney. (Photo: FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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A young man lies on a mat with burns covering his body, after falling victim to the explosion of the atom bomb over Nagasaki, Japan, 1945. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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A child with her mother in Nagasaki on the morning after the dropping of the atomic bomb, Aug. 10, 1945. Both have received a rice dumpling from emergency supplies. They were 1.5 km southeast of the Epicenter. (Photo: Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images)

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Smoke billows over the Japanese city of Nagasaki after an atomic bomb was dropped on the city Aug. 9, 1945. (Photo: Stringer/Reuters)

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Battered religious figures rest among the rubble of Nagasaki after the atomic bombing of the city by American armed forces on Aug. 9, 1945. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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Men who helped drop the second war-stopping atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, study a map of their objective shortly before the take off of the B-29 “77” which dropped the bomb on Aug. 9, 1945. Left to right: Capt. Theo J. Van Kirk, navigator, who also made flight aboard the ‘Enola Gay’ when it dropped the first atom bomb on Hiroshima; Major Sweeney, commanding officer of the 393 bomb squadron and pilot. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

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View of the radioactive plume from the bomb dropped on Nagasaki City, as seen from 9.6 km away, in Koyagi-jima, Japan, Aug. 9, 1945. The U.S. B-29 superfortress Bockscar dropped the atomic bomb nicknamed ‘Fat Man,’ which detonated above the ground, on northern part of Nagasaki City just after 11am. (Photo: Hiromichi Matsuda/Handout from Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum/Getty Images)

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General view in July 1946 of the Nagasaki Medical School in Japan. It was located at about one kilometer from where the American atomic bomb was dropped. The structure of the buildings held but debris and fallen trees are everywhere. One year after the explosion, the ruins of the bombing are still in evidence. The city, which is still radio-active, has been deserted by the survivors. (Photo: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

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Nagasaki in ruins after the atomic bombing of Aug. 9, 1945. (Photo: Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

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Only the reinforced concrete buildings of the Nagasaki Medical College hospital remain standing after the United States dropped its second atomic bomb on Aug. 9, 1945. The hospital was located 800 meters from ground zero of the atomic bomb explosion. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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The shapes of a man and ladder on the wooden wall of a factory is seen about 4 km away from where the atomic bomb ‘Fat Man’ was dropped on an unknown day of August, 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. The areas shadowed by a man and ladder remained unburnt by the energy of the ‘Fat Man’ bomb dropped in Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945. (Photo: The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)

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One building still stands in a cityscape devastated by the atom bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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The flight crews of two planes go over planes for the dropping of the first atomic bombs. The middle-aged man in the center is Lt. Col. Payette. On the left, in the foreground in profile is Lt. Ralph Devore. The man looking over Payette’s shoulder is Major Chuck Sweeney. Sweeney commanded and Devore flew with the mission to drop the second bomb on Nagasaki. To the right in profile are Lts. Thomas Ferebee (in cap, with mustache) and Morris Jeppson, both of whom flew with the first mission to bomb Hiroshima. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

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Japan marks the 72nd anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima

Japan on Sunday marked 72 years since the world’s first nuclear attack on Hiroshima, with the nation’s traditional contradictions over atomic weapons again coming into focus.

The anniversary came after Japan sided last month with nuclear powers Britain, France and the U.S. to dismiss a UN treaty banning atomic weapons, which was rejected by critics for ignoring the reality of security threats such as North Korea.

Japan is the only country to have suffered atomic attacks, in 1945.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, speaking at the annual ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park near the ground zero, said Japan hoped to push for a world without nuclear weapons in a way that all countries can agree.

“For us to truly pursue a world without nuclear weapons, we need participation from both nuclear-weapons and non-nuclear weapons states,” Abe said in his speech at the annual ceremony.

“Our country is committed to leading the international community by encouraging both sides” to make progress toward abolishing nuclear arms, Abe added without directly referring to the UN treaty. (AFP)

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People pray for atomic bomb victims

People pray for atomic bomb victims in front of the cenotaph for the victims of the 1945 atomic bombing, at Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, August 6, 2017, on the 72nd anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city. (Photo: Kyodo via Reuters)

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Peace Message Lantern Floating Ceremony

People attend the Peace Message Lantern Floating Ceremony held to console the souls of the A-Bomb victims after the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on the occasion of the 72nd anniversary of Hiroshima atomic bombing on Aug. 6, 2017 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo: David Mareuil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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Children pray after releasing paper lanterns

Children pray after releasing paper lanterns on the Motoyasu river facing the Atomic Bomb Dome in remembrance of atomic bomb victims on the 72nd anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, western Japan, Aug. 6, 2017, in this photo taken by Kyodo. (Photo: Kyodo via Reuters)

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Kazumi Matsui hands over the name list

Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui, right, hands over the name list of newly added people who died of the world’s first atomic bombing over the past year during a ceremony to mark the 72nd anniversary of the 1945 bombing that killed 140,000 people, at the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017. “This hell is not a thing of the past,” Matsui said in his peace declaration at Sunday’s ceremony. “As long as nuclear weapons exist and policymakers threaten their use, their horror could leap into our present at any moment. You could find yourself suffering their cruelty.” (Photo: Shohei Miyano/Kyodo News via AP)

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A Japanese national flag flies at half-mast

A Japanese national flag flies at half-mast during the memorial ceremony for victims of the Aug. 6,1945 atomic bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan, Aug. 6, 2017. (Photo: Kimimasa Mayama/EPA/REX/Shutterstock)

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Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lays a wreath

Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attends a ceremony at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on Aug. 6, 2017 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo: David Mareuil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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Visitors lays flowers and pray

Visitors lays flowers and pray for the atomic bomb victims in front of the cenotaph at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017. (Photo: Richard Atrero de Guzman/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

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People attend the ceremony

People attend a ceremony to mark the 72nd anniversary of the world’s first atomic bombing that killed 140,000 people at the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017. Hiroshima’s appeal of “never again” on the 72nd anniversary has acquired renewed urgency as North Korea moves ever closer to acquiring nuclear weapons. (Photo: Ryosuke Ozawa/Kyodo News via AP)

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People write peace messages

People write down peace messages at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on Aug. 6, 2017 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo: David Mareuil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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People burn incense and offer prayers

People burn incense and offer prayers early morning prior to the 72nd anniversary memorial service for the atomic bomb victims at the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 2017. (Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

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The cenotaph at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

Visitors lays flowers and pray for the atomic bomb victims in front of the cenotaph at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017. (Photo: Richard Atrero de Guzman/NURPhoto) (Photo by Richard Atrero de Guzman/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

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Lanterns are floated to console the victim’s souls

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splovacatopancakes  asked:

I have never heard of SciFell until I saw your blog, and I really like it!! And your style is so unique and amazing, thank you for sharing it with everyone! QvQ

Also, I don’t draw sins if you’re worry about Lust!Sans ww
Continues from this: video recording

I asked him to take a Disney princess photo

And I, you.

YEY 😁 thanq thanq ! Diana prince x f reader (was an experiment like Logan ) they fought in WW, obv there’s something between them. But the reader is actually scared to get close given her state (esp since  she’s a mutant and dangerous) but fast forward reader is is London, Diana in Paris right ? And they occasionally talk and she sends her the photo from WW ? Modern day they meet up ? 

requested by @subjectx17

Sorry this took such a long time! I had to rewrite this a couple of times because every single time I was finished with it, I ended up not being satisfied. I don’t think I am satisfied much with this one but it’s a little bit better than the previous ones I have made! Hope you enjoy!


You place the framed photo back on to your desk, smiling to yourself. You have been doing that a whole lot lately. Smiling to yourself. But receiving that photo only simply reminded you of the fact that you should probably start to move on too.

You pick up your phone, dialing the number you have memorized the first time you received it. After a few rings, it finally gets picked up. “Hello?” The moment you hear her voice; you are hit with memories from the past – the two of you had been on two different sides, had fought against each other during the war but ultimately, you had been more worried about trying to live and ended up helping her instead. “Is that you, Y/N?”

You smile when you heard your name falling from her lips. “Hi, Diana. It’s me.” You could hear her chuckling and the smile on your face grows bigger. “How are you, Diana?”

“Better, now that I have heard from you. Did you receive my present?”

You glance at the photo – it was a photo taken of the six of you – and you nod your head. “Yes, I did. Thank you for sending me a copy.” Like Diana, the two of you had outlived the rest of your friends and even though it’s been such a long time, you still miss them.

“I received the original from a friend.” She tells you and you nod your head, wondering who her friend is to be able to find a photo from all those years ago.

“Do you think we will be able to meet up some time soon?” You know your unspoken message went unheard when you hear the sharp intake of breath and you bite the inside of your cheek from wanting to smile too much.

“Of course – we haven’t seen each other in such a long time, Y/N. I was surprised when I received your call – I did not think my mail would have reached you or you are still living in London.” She explains and you nod your head. This country is where most of your friends are buried, you could not bear to leave them.

“Yeah, I am still in London. What about you?”

“I am currently in Paris now – curating but I will be back at the end of this month and perhaps, we can go for dinner then?” She asks and you check your calendar – a little bit less than two weeks until the end of the month. If you could wait a few years to contact her, you certainly can wait a few more days to see her.

“Yes, of course, Diana.”

“I really am happy that you finally called me, Y/N. I have missed you,”

“And I, you, Diana.”

4

It’s been a month since wizard world Tulsa. Still can’t get over this happening. Super happy I did the space nerd op with him/for him , the one for my friend who couldn’t be there, and I adore that he went full out dork smile in my “I could do this all day op” 😂 he’s too precious. Just sort of a Reshare since everyone’s enjoyed most of these 😊❤️