ww lovely

Because I absolutely love Wondertrev and the relationship between Diana Prince and Steve Trevor (and Gal/Chris)…..here is a slightly brightened version of the kiss scene for all of your heart’s content and gif potential.

Vid credits go to original creator, sadly I can’t find the poster’s Tumblr post anymore.

What really sucks about the way Joss Whedon writes is that he sort of has this idea that if he writes about women being strong and confident, that is all it takes for women to appreciate his work. Like, even if the villain constantly belittles a woman for being a woman and people are constantly harassing her and sexualizing her, it’s okay because she’s strong and she can take it.

The biggest difference between Whedon’s version of Wonder Woman and Jenkins is that in Whedon’s version Wonder Woman is A Woman. She (and the audience) must be constantly aware that she is a Woman, that she is Sexy, that she is overcoming incredible odds because she has the terrible disadvantage of Being Born A Woman.

Whereas in Jenkins’ film Diana simply exists. There are some points made by other characters about her being a woman, like when Steve won’t sleep with her because he feels it’s improper, or when his secretary says, “Oh yes, put specs on her, like after that she won’t be the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen”, but Diana is almost completely unaware of her status as a Dreaded Woman. Her excitement over a baby? She’s literally never seen one before. Her little makeover seen? Spends the whole thing looking for something comfortable she can fight in. She basically never mentions the difference between men and women, never even says that women are better or whatever because she was raised by them. 

Joss Whedon would have never let Wonder Woman forget she was a Woman. She would have constantly been making comments about it, wether positive or negative, as would everyone around her. In Whedon’s heyday that might have flown a lot better, but now women seem to be a little sick of grrrrl power. They just want power. They just want to exist, both on screen and in life, without constant reminders that they are Women and that they must pay for that at every turn.

A blond-haired, blue-eyed actor named Chris is playing an American named Steve, who’s fighting in a world war. Along the way, he meets a scary foreign brunette woman and takes an unlikely band of friends of different nationalities through an event, and goes up against a couple of Germans, one large and deranged, one smaller and a scientist. Steve, at some point, hijacks a plane and destroys it (and a weapon) for the greater good. Someone is looking back at it from the future, and will eventually team up with a millionaire with daddy issues and cool toys. There’s also a shield involved.


Am I talking about Captain America: The First Avenger, or Wonder Woman?

what made diana’s flashbacks concerning steve so powerful is the fact that her love for him is all encompassing – it’s romantic plus platonic, it’s loving this person as well as his values, his good heart, his humility, his mission and his sacrifice.

when diana said she believed in love, it wasn’t just romantic love. it was love for everything good in humanity, it was love for the world and every living being, it was love for peace and happiness despite the ugliness and cruelty and war and death.

and that’s why wonder woman was moving and its message unprecedented in any other superhero movie.

I think the most beautiful thing about Diana is that she doesn’t fight the patriarchy.  She just flat out doesn’t acknowledge that it exist.  A room where women aren’t allowed?  Gender rules about sleeping with someone? Bruce grabbing her arm in a power play?  Diana’s all just, you’re doing what now? She’s a Princess and a Goddess, so way more powerful than you on any kind of scale.  She’s just gonna lol in your face any time the patriarchy comes up because she’s the most powerful person in the room at any given time, so she doesn’t have time for men to mess around pretending they have a say in anything she does.