written by gene roddenberry

anonymous asked:

Do you know what the first big movie novelisation was? Were they ever a big cultural force or just something that existed but no one really cared about?

Before I go into the history of the novelization (and its cousin, the comic adaptation), let me give a couple of recommendations of a few that are better than the movie itself or are just worth reading: Peter David’s novelization of Return of Swamp Thing turned a just-okay so-so movie I forgot the instant I left the theater into something very beautiful, poignant, charming and wonderful. It was all little tweaks, tiny little nudges that made individual moments that fell flat turn into something that worked. It’s amazing how few changes he made to make this story the best possible version of itself, though there were some things the novelization had that made it brilliant and surreal and even experimental, like for instance, Peter David made Alan Moore, Swamp Thing writer, an actual character in the story itself, a clerk at a motel who makes creepy and cryptic foreshadowing comments all through the story.

The novelization of the “meh” Jaws rip-off Orca by Arthur Herzog is a great book because it a tight thriller that gets us right into the head of the orca whale who wants to kill the whaler who murdered his family. Scenes that were maudlin are very moving in prose, with a whale mourning her dead baby and mate, and the hunter is even more tragic when we get into his head and see his remorse. It was like the whale started to represent his guilt. By contrast, the only part of the movie I remember is when the killer whale sets fire to an entire town. 

The novelization of the Flash Gordon movie is extraordinary because it contains explicit sex scenes. The talk is that it was based on an extremely horny early script for the film where it was a European scifi sexploitation romp like Barbarella or Lexx. Hahahaha, can you just imagine being some eleven year old who bought Flash Gordon because he liked the cool space movie only to find a chapter with a blowjob scene in a seraglio?

The whole idea behind Buckaroo Banzai: Across the Eighth Dimension is that it’s actually part 7 of a long running movie series that doesn’t exist, so there are lots of “hey, look, it’s him!” cameos to people we never saw before and tons of lore that just sat in the background. Buckaroo Banzai is a test I use to see if someone’s sense of humor is compatible with mine. So it stands to reason that the novelization, which is more information rich, is a delight for fans of the series. It’s like the only expanded universe product for something that never got an expanded universe. It has details like the fact that Pecos (briefly mentioned as being in Tibet in the film) is actually one of the few Hong Kong Cavaliers to be a woman, and she was in Tibet searching for Buckaroo’s archenemy Hanoi Xan. 

While I wouldn’t say that the novelization of Star Trek: the Motion Picture is better than the movie, exactly, it was written by Gene Roddenberry himself, and had one especially weird fourth wall breaking passage that seemed to be a shout out to the slash-writers, where Captain Kirk says “hey, I don’t know where this idea comes from, but I am super-straight, you guys, seriously. I am only attracted to women.” The novelization also was interesting in that we learned a bit more about Lieutenant Ilea’s empathic powers, which are fundamentally non-visual and we only got a vague sense of in the film. She received emotional signals very much like Deanna Troi later would, and she was not only a receiving empath but a projecting one: we learned that Mr. Sulu, from a less sexually evolved race than Deltans, couldn’t stop picture her naked. 

Finally, getting back to Peter David again, who is like the Phillip K. Dick or Michelangelo of this medium, his novelization of Spider-Man 3 is better than the movie. Moments that fail in the book work there. 

As for the history of the novelization, you have to try to imagine a world where you can’t see a movie whenever you want to. You can only see it when it’s in theaters for a few weeks or when it comes on TV years later. Therefore, novelizations and comic adaptations are designed to replicate the experience of going to the theater. In that sense, they’re almost a relic, technologically speaking, of a time before video and on demand. Fun fact: in the late 1970s, Marvel Comics had a ton of cash problems, and the only thing keeping the lights on was the money made by movie adaptations of things like Logan’s Run.  

Novelizations are extremely old: they go back to the 1920s, and one interesting example is the 1925 Tod Browning film London After Midnight, a horror film that no copies of exist at all and is a “lost film,” but because of the novelization (and a ton of still images during production), we nonetheless know what the plot of the movie is pretty well, to the point that the London After Midnight vampire is almost as iconic as other monsters, despite the fact no one has seen the actual film in decades.

To directly answer your question, the first big book novelization was actually for King Kong in 1933 by Delos Lovelace, which came out the year the movie did. The public went mad for King Kong and the book sold in the millions. It cemented the idea that the novelization is a pretty standard tie-in for a film release, and it’s the most important tie in novel ever written.

anonymous asked:

HOLD ON IT'S CANON THAT THEY'RE BONDED?

YEP LMFAO !!!!!!!!!!! ANOTHER GODDAMN REASON THEY SHOULD BE CANON IN AOS BUT WHATEVER FINE

BUT YEAH THEY’RE CANON BONDED IN TOS :))))) IN THE MOTION PICTURE NOVEL WRITTEN BY GENE RODDENBERRY HIS GODDAMN SELF SPOCK IS ON VULCAN ABOUT TO GO THROUGH KOLINAHR AND HE LEGIT HEARS KIRK’S EXACT THOUGHTS FROM EARTH TALKING ABOUT HOW HE WISHES SPOCK WAS BY HIS SIDE  AND BC OF THIS HE ISN’T ABLE TO GO THROUGH WITH KOLINAHR

IT’S ALSO EXPLICITLY MENTIONED LATER IN THE NOVEL THAT THEY HAVE A BOND/THEY HAD A “MEETING OF MINDS” THAT WAS GREATER THAN EVEN THE PHYSICAL LOVE OF PON FARR

“Spock, your thoughts. Open them to me.”

Spock could not refuse the High Master T’sai, not even at this moment of shame. As she touched him, Spock let his mind open, in the giving and receiving of mindmeldOneness. Kaiidth! What was there was there, and it was T’sai’s right to learn the complete truth of it.

//The Klingons weren’t destroyed. It feels like … like they’ve become “wall exhibits in Hell.” And it’s headed for Earth. Spock, I wish you were here to help me understand.//

Spock looked up, puzzled. That had felt like Jim Kirk’s thoughts. And yet it was T’sai who was standing here and to whom he had opened his thoughts. She was now releasing Spock’s consciousness and retrieving her own. Then her lips opened, and before she spoke Spock already knew what her words would be.

“Your answer lies elsewhere, Spock.”

“The City On The Edge Of Forever” won major writing awards for both the aired and Harlan Ellison’s original version of its screenplay. The broadcasted script for “City” earned a 1968 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation (it was running against four other episodes of Star Trek) while Ellison took home the Writers Guild of America Award for “Best Written Dramatic Episode” for his version.

At the WGA awards, Gene Roddenberry, Gene Coon, Robert Justman, Herb Solow and others involved in the show’s production were on hand to show support for his work despite the problems they’d experienced. Ellison, of course, used his time at the podium to berate the audience about executives rewriting his work.

10

STAR TREK   “Journey to Babel”

starring William Shatner,  Leonard Nimoy,  DeForest Kelley,  Walter Koenig,  Nichelle Nichols,  Majel Barrett with William O'Connell,  John Wheeler,  Reggie Nalder and guest starring Mark Lenard and Miss Jane Wyatt

written by D.C. Fontana,  directed Joseph Pevney,  created by Gene Roddenberry

50 minutes;  original air date  November 17, 1967

As he entered, Spock’s ears caught the sounds of humans at love […] it was the beginning he had heard and it distracted him. Odd, this human need to contiunally rub this and that part of their bodies together, particularly since humans conducted it while fully rational, sometimes even intermixing with conversation, which was certainly far from any definition of passion by Vulcan standards.
— 

From The Motion Picture Novelization written by Gene Roddenberry.

The omniscient narrator tells us what Spock thinks about Human-style sex.

In Spock’s opinion, human-style love-making is way too mechanical, too rational, not passionate enough, in comparison to how Vulcans do it. They don’t do it often, but when they do, they do it properly, Spock knows.

Vulcan sex is better than human sex, in Spock’s opinion.

Apparently Vulcans could teach Humans a lesson or two in the art of passionate love-making.

seeingbeyondfear replied to your photoset “oh”

as somebody who doesn’t watch this show, it looks like this was confirmed as canon way more solidly than mulder & scully ever were

While those screencaps were unaltered and actually happened in that order, the context is important–otherwise, it definitely looks like they’re about to roll around in some sheets together. It’s not the case, though.

TOS basically centers around Jim and Spock’s relationship, and how they deal with problems in space. Over the course of three seasons, there’s an abundance of evidence there in plain sight that shows the conspicuous love between them. If they were a F/M pairing, there would be no question about the affection they have for each other. However, since we sadly still live in a homophobic society, seeing those examples isn’t proof enough for some.

That’s all right. Because, enter the first movie, Star Trek The Motion Picture…

KIRK: Were you right? About V'GER?
SPOCK: A lifeform of its own… a conscious, living entity.
CHAPEL (OC): A living machine?
KIRK: It considers the Enterprise a living machine. That’s why the probe refers our ship as an entity.
SPOCK: I saw V'GER’s planet, a planet populated by living machines. Unbelievable technology. V'GER has knowledge that spans this universe. And, yet with all this pure logic… V'GER is barren… cold. No mystery, no beauty. …I should have known.
KIRK: Known? Known what? *grabs Spock’s shoulders* Spock!
MCCOY: *goes to pull Kirk away* Captain…
KIRK: *Smacks his hand off and turns to McCoy, obviously agitated* Bones! *Turns back to Spock and takes his shoulders again, leaning in close to his face. Softly:* Spock… What should you have known? What should you have known???
SPOCK: *whispers:* Jim… *Grabs Kirk’s bicep tightly. Then, both of their arms move and their hands clasp* This simple feeling… is beyond V'GER’s comprehension.

(THIS LITERALLY HAPPENS AT THIS POINT IN TIME:)


SPOCK:  No meaning, …no hope, …and, Jim, no answers. It’s asking questions.
KIRK: What questions?
SPOCK: ‘Is this… all I am? Is there nothing more?’

Yep. [x]

Shortly after:

The only way this story could further reveal how deeply they love each other is if you read the book–written by Gene Roddenberry himself. I see absolutely no way of denying the depth of the relationship between them after all of this.

But people still do, and to each their own. Characters and works of fiction are made for interpretation.

Keith Birdsong Star Trek: The God-Thing Unpublished Paperback Novel Cover Painting Original Art (Pocket Books, 1991). Co-written by series creator Gene Roddenberry and long-time Trek novelist Michael Jan Friedman, this story was set in the era of the first Star Trek: The Motion Picture film. The story was never published, so this fantastic Birdsong cover was never used! Roddenberry wanted to turn this into a film, and despite multiple changes requested by the studio, it never happened. His Estate has previously refused to release the draft for the story, so this single piece of art is as close as you can get to discovering why Spock was a Hippie.

10

STAR TREK   “Mirror, Mirror”

starring  William Shatner,  Leonard Nimoy,  DeForest Kelley, Nichelle Nichols,  James Doohan,  George Takei,  Walter Koenig, John Winston  with guest stars Vic Perrin and Barbara Luna as Marlena Moreau

written by  Jerome Bixby,  directed by Marc Daniels,  created by Gene Roddenberry

50 minutes;  October 6, 1967

10

STAR TREK  “Balance of Terror”

starring  William Shatner,  Leonard Nimoy,  Mark Lenard,  DeForest Kelley,  Grace Lee Whitney,  Paul Comi,  George Takei,  James Doohan,  Lawrence Montaigne,  Barbara Baldavini

written by Paul Schneider,  directed by Vincent McEveety,  created by Gene Roddenberry

50 minutes;  original air date December 15, 1966

10

STAR  TREK  “Where No Man Has Gone Before"  (2nd pilot)

starring  William Shatner,  Leonard Nimoy,  Gary Lockwood,  Sally Kellerman,  James Doohan,  George Takei,  Paul Carr,  Paul Fix,  Lloyd Haynes,  Andrea Dromm

created by Gene Roddenerry,  directed by James Goldstone,  written by Samuel A. Peeples and Gene Roddenberry

50 minutes;  original airdate September 22, 1966

2

Front and back cover to the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, written by Gene Roddenberry. I’ve talked about how unusual this book is before, full of odd details that don’t quite feel right, even though they’ve come from the mind of the Great Bird himself. 

How weird is it? Here’s the very first paragraph in the book, from the Preface “written” by James T. Kirk himself.

My name us James Tiberius Kirk. Kirk because my father and his male forebears followed the old custom of passing along a family identity name. I received James because it was both the name of my father’s beloved brother as well as that of my mother’s first love instructor. Tiberius, as I am forever tired of explaining, was the Roman Emperor whose life for some unfathomable reason fascinated my grandfather Samuel.

Love instructors, people. Roddenberry was an odd duck, to say the least.

Despite re-reading it just last year, it’s next in my book queue for whatever reason. Maybe I’m a nerd? Huh.

Weird fact: I’ve had this copy, a first printing, since 1983. I guess I was deeply convinced of the value of an original edition or something.

10

STAR TREK   “The Immunity Syndrome”

starring William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy,  DeForest Kelley,  James Doohan,  Nichelle Nichols,  Walter Koenig,  John Winston,  Majel Barrett

written by Robert Sabaroff,  directed by Joseph Pevney, created by Gene Roddenberry

50 minutes;  January 18, 1968