wounds and injuries

Morrison vampire stuff

Some Morrison worldbuilding tidbits for you:

  • vampires getting super invested in nutrition so they know how to take care of their humans, and then being horrified at what humans will actually consume:
    • three-day-old coffee
    • twenty piece chicken nuggets
    • one (1) granola bar as a meal
    • their own fingernails
  • humans lying about what they eat:
    • “How do pop rocks even work?”
      “They’re made of tiny larvae that explode when they come into contact with human saliva.”
      “… That can’t be real.”
  • the constant exasperated repitions of “human stuff” or “vampire stuff” whenever they don’t understand each other
  • humans dabbing garlic on their pulse points when they’re pissed
    • “C’mon, I’m starving, why are you like this?”
      “Are you sorry?”
      “Yes”
      “What’s the magic word, Clarence?”
      “Please?”
  • vampires that forget humans are delicate and accidentally hurt them
  • humans that act like wounded dogs over minor injuries just to watch vampires fall over themselves apologizing
  • vampires exaggerating time for comedic effect:
    • “I haven’t heard this song in forty years”
      “This came out in 2004″
      “It’s been forty years. I have aged.”
      “You literally have not.”
    • “When was the last time you did any laundry?”
      “1965″
      “Fuck you.”
  • telling vampires to “go back to your coffin” when they’re grumpy
  • humans constantly asking “how did they do this in your day?” about every single daily task
  • vampires who hoard tools and appliances from the time period they most enjoyed
  • young vampires flipping off the sun and screaming at it about evolution
    • old vampires who pull their collars up and frown behind their sunglasses
  • erroneous threats based on abilities no vampire actually has:
    • “I’m gonna show up to your wedding as a swarm of bats and shit on the cake”
4

Photographs and CT scans of a bullet that entered the left anterior neck and lodged in the right posterior neck, completely transecting the spinal cord yet managed to completely avoid the vertebral artery. The bullet was removed under only local anaesthetic. The patient was left with quadriplegia.

7

Voltron Aesthetic: Ancient Rome AU

Gladiators seek to best all; It is the only way to survive in the arena.


Allura, daughter of the late Senator Alfor, serves as the presiding Domina over the House of Altea. Meanwhile her uncle Coran is head of their family’s Ludus, a trainer and trader for both the house gladiators and those leased by other families into his care. The reputation of their ludus is largely attributed to Shiro, who was once renowned as the undefeated and still hailed as The Champion despite no longer being active in the arena. His glory days ended after the loss of his arm to Zarkon, a fellow gladiator who belonged to the House of Galra. None the less he is now the Doctore to Altea’s gladiators, all respect him and fear the crack of his whip. Any wounds and injuries are tended to by the house Medicus, fondly called Pidge due to their keen eyes and small, pidgeon like stature. Their true name has been all but forgotten now. If not in their infirmary chances are they can be found out in the gardens or marketplace apothecary. Meals for the entire household, including the ludus, are prepared by the Archimagirus, Hunk, and a a small team of other house slaves. The Numidian had originally been purchased to fight in the arena, however his skills were found to be better use in the kitchen. Due to his affable personality he has developed close bonds with the entire household and does not tolerate any stealing of rations from the younger recruits. The House’s new rising champion is Lance, a Hispanian boy who had been within the ludus walls for nearly six years. His title as the Son of Neptune is a nod to his Retiarius fighting style, however it had stemmned from when he was first brought to Rome; the story goes that he was disciplined by being dragged behind his slave ship for a full day with few respites, yet didn’t drown nor fall prey to sharks. The truth is far more simple - he had been a pearl diver in his seaside village and was accustomed to holding his breath for extended periods. He is the self-declared rival of the last notable member of the ludus, a spitfire from the far East hailing from the same region as their Doctore. Keith’s title was born from his performances in the arena from where he would always emerge bathed in blood, both from his own fresh clawmarks and that spilled from whatever beast he had faced off. Unlike the others, he is not an Altea gladiator, he belongs to the House of Galra. His House is one notorious for producing skilled bestiarii such as himself and he had originially been sent to Coran’s ludus for the sole purpose of keeping an eye on his sire’s defeated rival…Not that the others need to know that particular detail.

@outtacommission mentioned Lance with an infected wound and I was kind of inspired. Not sure if I want to continue this or leave it here but… here’s a thing. I had some free time.

——— [part two here]

Lurching forward, Lance catches himself on the side of his bathroom stall and grimaces, fighting back a wave of nausea. His side stings–rather, his entire midsection, from the healing, jagged cut on the left to the stinging of his skin and the cramps of his stomach. It hurts, and Lance knows he ought to ask someone else to check on it, but he’s determined to fight this one out alone.

After all, he doesn’t want to be shouted at for being the screw up, not again. Not this time when it’s something as minor and foolish as being cut. They already had to repair his undersuit, which he felt bad about when Allura had fixed him with that look of displeasure, and he didn’t want them worrying more. It’s just a cut, of course. That’s nothing, nothing the wonderful and strong Lance can’t handle on his own.

Keep reading

You’ve probably read this post by @fuusenchan​ which breaks down the details of the scenes in Katsugeki/Touken Ranbu opening, say - Mutsunokami and Ryoma’s death, Kane-san/Horikawa and Hijikata’s death, Yagen and the Honnouji Incident, etc.

And we have all probably come to the same conclusion that this opening is already pretty sad as it is.

But wait, what about the ending?

From Wikipedia: Tōrō Nagashi (灯籠流し) is a Japanese ceremony in which participants float paper lanterns down a river. This activity is traditionally performed on the final evening of the Bon Festival in the belief that it will help to guide the souls of the departed to the spirit world.

And what do we have here?

The Shinsengumi - where Izuminokami Kanesada and Horikawa Kunihiro were part of with their former master, the Vice Commander Hijikata Toshizo.

The “Father of the Imperial Japanese Navy” Sakamoto Ryoma, who was the owner of Mutsunokami Yoshiyuki. The lady beside him was most likely his spouse, Narasaki Ryo.

Tadakatsu Honda, “The Warrior who Surpassed Death” and the former owner of Tonbokiri. It was said that he had never once suffered any significant wounds/injuries despite having participated in more than 100 battles in his whole life.

Now I might be wrong with this one…

The sword seems to be Tsurumaru Kuninaga. I’ve tried looking up his previous owners and I’m not sure who this guy was. My closest bet is Hojo Sadatoki during the Heizen Gate Incident where he purged Taira Yoritsuna and 90 of his followers.

Now this one’s just a wild guess, but if we were to follow the opening, only Yagen Toushirou is left, so this person could be Oda Nobunaga (sorry if I’m wrong though).

Conclusion: Katsugeki OP features the sword reliving the memories of their late masters. Meanwhile the ED features the masters themselves while they were still alive. Thus, be prepared to say goodbye to your hearts as Ufotable and the gang rip your feelings to pieces throughout the episodes.

anonymous asked:

Could you make a chart for the fatality of bullet wounds please?

Sure, nonny! Happy to help! Sorry this took me a while, but here you go…

[Table: “Area Shot” in one column, “Potential Lethality” in another. “Area Shot” column lists body parts: head, chest, abdomen, upper arm, upper leg, forearm, lower leg, hand, foot. “Potential Lethality” lists “potentially lethal” in all rows.]

You see why I had so many problems answering this ask, anon?

In all seriousness, I wanted to use this to prove a point. Gunshots anywhere on the body have the potential to be fatal.

I’ll give you the classic EMS paradox that’s been taught to me during training. You come up on a scene with a man unconscious on the floor. In point of fact he’s in cardiac arrest.

Of course, you start CPR and strip him  down naked and check for wounds, because that’s a thing you do in EMS. But the only thing you find is a gunshot wound in the palm of his hand. Entry, no exit. Small little hole, little bit of a powder burn.

What the hell happened?

What the hell happened is, he was trying to stop himself from getting shot, reached out, and occluded the muzzle with his hand. The bullet traveled under the skin, up the outstretched arm, up into the shoulder, where it lodged in and deflated the lung, and the person died.  

This is supposedly based on a real case (note: I’m too lazy to verify this), which only proves the point that real life is stranger than fiction.

But a GSW to the hand doesn’t have to have some magical properties to be potentially fatal. In addition to the ever-present threat of complications such as sepsis, there’s also the fact that the radial artery is right. there. The wrist isn’t far from the hand, and bullets and bones have strange and almost miraculous relationships when it comes to trajectory.

The same is true in the foot, only more so, because hard floor surfaces tend to generate ricochets, and the bullet could simply go through the foot, ricochet off the floor, and come up and hit, say, the dorsalis pedis artery, or an artery in the ankle, and cause a life threatening bleed.

Now, just because something is potentially lethal doesn’t mean it automatically is lethal. Once upon a time I wrote a post about survivable headshot wounds: Headshots: They’re Not Always Lethal (Yes, Really)

And just because a bullet to the hand CAN cause laceration to the radial artery (or even a pneumothorax!) doesn’t mean it will. People can get shot in the chest and live. People can get shot in the chest and die. Most leg wounds can be taken care of at home (if it’s a clean through-and-through with minimal bleeding). Some leg wounds will be fatal inside of 10 minutes (femoral artery) or will require years of rehab (femur or femoral nerve injury).

This is why I have such a hard time writing about gunhots, even though they’re HEAVILY requested (though you guys seem to have a thing for arrows and drownings lately….)

I hope this helped, but I suspect I’ve been supremely unhelpful.

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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anonymous asked:

My character suffers from (among other things) hemiparesis as a result of spinal cord damage. At the moment the cause of the damage is a gunshot wound, but how plausible is that? And if it's entirely improbable, what sort of injury might cause that type of spinal cord damage or just the hemiparesis? The injury occurred five years before the story begins and she's received plenty of medical care in that time.

The answer you’re looking for is yes, this is wholly probable, and I’m happy that I can give it! 

The spinal cord lesion you’re looking for is a particular type of incomplete spinal cord injury, or iSCI, called Brown-Séquard Syndrome. It can definitely be caused by a gunshot wound. 

In Brown-Sequard, you lose two things: motion and sensation on the ipsilateral side (same side) as the injury, and temperature and pain sensation on the contralateral (opposite) side. Of course, the level of the body to which this paralysis occurs depends on the level of the spine at which the injury occurred; to understand this, you need a map of dermatomes, which looks like this: 

So an injury to the character’s left at T4, for example, would cause loss of motor function on the left side below the nipple, and loss of pain and temperature sensation on the right side below the same point. 

Specifically, on the left side, they would have a type of paralysis called spastic paralysis, in which the muscles get unusually tight, stiff, and “pull.” Because of this they’re likely to take a muscle relaxer on a regular basis to help loosen the muscles; baclofen is a common medication. 

Note that sensation on the ipsilateral side to the injury will actually be mostly preserved, though they’ll lose the ability to tell light touch from strong touch, the ability to feel vibration, and proprioception. Because of Reasons™ , the sensory side and motor side of the spinal cord switch sides in the ascending neurons. This is why the damage will include right-sided loss of pain sensation and left-sided motor paralysis. 

There’s a shockingly good Wikipedia article on Brown-Sequard Syndrome [here]. 

Go forth and shoot your character right in the spine! 

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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So I wrote a part two to this story, I hope it’s okay. I’m tired, so this is barely beta’d.

Thank you to all of the nice comments I’ve been seeing!! You’re all very nice!

Lance fights the idea of the healing pod. They don’t know much about how the pods affect humans over prolonged uses, so the idea of using them too often is discouraged. Not for colds and small illnesses–no, they’ve got tweaked and changed medications for those with them in the medical bay–but for broken bones or heavy wounds. An infected wound, Shiro’s already clarified with Coran, can be treated in the pods, and it definitely fits the criteria, but Lance turns it down.

“It may be better to wait until he can hold something down,” Coran suggests softly.

Keep reading

  • Toxic parents: Not only we can brainwash you from early age that you only exist for our benefit and that your only purpose is to please us and make our lives easier, we can rob you of all of the family experiences you needed to grow and develop, we can inflict wounds and emotional injuries and fears that will haunt you for the rest of your life, but we can also invalidate everything you've been through and act like we're faultless and get away with everything without as much as feeling guilty or responsible, and convince everyone that it's all your fault and that we were great parents, and you, a failure and waste of space are ungrateful little vermin who dared to defy us by requesting basic human rights and non-hostile environment to live in.
  • Toxic parents: How dare you not give us unconditional love and forgiveness.

anonymous asked:

Hi! What kind of injuries could cause a fairly young, healthy guy to walk with a limp & require a cane for the rest of his life? He would have been fighting in a war- fantasy set in modern times, with a fair mix of magic, modern, and ancient weapons (or combo of any of the three). There are also magic users, though not too many of them.

Hey there nonny! Really any significant injury to the leg can justify this, but especially sharp force trauma (stabs and slashes) and blunt force trauma (breaking the leg). Depending on how things heal, it’s definitely possible to have some trouble getting around. 

Damage to the knee will also typically cause significant limping. 

One other thought… medieval armor was heavy. Much like a shocking number of modern troops, knee injuries could be very common. Alternatively, significantly twisting the knee could cause an ACL or MCL tear, which again leads to limping. 

The question I would really ask myself about this injury, then, is why? Why did this character get hurt, and more importantly, how did getting hurt change him? Did it end his career as a soldier? How would it have affected his mindset? His ability to work? What does he do to get around his disability? 

And – if he had to, even disabled, would he take up the sword again? Disability could change his relationship with the war he fought or with the army he fought for. (Were there mages who refused to help him? Was he supposed to get a pension but didn’t?)

In short: don’t just give him a limp to give him a limp. Make it a part of who he is. Honor people with mobility issues by making this character a fully-fledged person, with that disability incorporated into it. 

Best of luck with your story! 

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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