wounded knee incident

A member of the American Indian Movement (AIM) at Wounded Knee, S.D. raises his rifle and cheers after receiving news that federal authorities had extended the cease fire for further negotiations to end the standoff. AIM was occupying the village that was the site of the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre. March 8, 1973.

Demian DinéYazhi’
Untitled (For Anna Mae Aquash Pictou), 2013

– Printable poster 18"x 24" –

In the spirit of International Women’s Day, let us take a moment to honor the words and work of the late Mi'kmaq warrior Anna Mae Aquash Pictou, whose lifeline was shortened due to her brave and resilient spirit!

This poster was inspired by Anna Mae’s Aquash’s statement to the Court of South Dakota, made after her arrest and interrogation by the FBI regarding fellow activist Leonard Peltier, who was wanted tor the murder of two FBI agents. The FBI had arrested and interrogated Aquash a number of times throughout 1975, including one in which she was allegedly told she would not live out the year it she did not give up the information they wanted. Aquash claimed to have no information about Peltier. She was murdered in late 1975, and her body was discovered along a stretch of highway in South Dakota in February 1976.

About Anna Mae Aquash (March 27, 1945 – mid-December 1975):

Annie Mae Aquash (Mi'kmaq name Naguset Eask) was a Mi'kmaq activist from Nova Scotia, Canada, who became a member of the American Indian Movement, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, United States during the mid-1970s.

Aquash participated in the 1972 Trail of Broken Treaties and occupation of the Department of Interior headquarters in Washington, DC; the Wounded Knee Incident in 1973; and armed occupations in Canada and Wisconsin in following years. On February 24, 1976, her body was found on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota; she was initially determined to have died from exposure but was found to have been executed by gunshot. Aquash was thirty years old at the time of her death.

R.I.S.E.:

RADICAL
INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT
_______________________.

Mary Brave Woman Olguin ~ Brulé Lakota

Mary Brave Bird, also known as Mary Brave Woman Olguin, Mary Crow Dog, Mary Ellen Moore-Richard (September 26, 1954 – February 14, 2013) was a Sicangu Lakota writer and activist who was a member of the American Indian Movement during the 1970s and participated in some of their most publicized events, including the Wounded Knee Incident when she was 18 years old.