wouldnt be la with the mexicans

The other night I politely asked Lala Romero why the models of her LA based clothing brand “Bella Doña” are only light skinned and she told me to look at the timeline again and not ask such a dumb question. Then her friend told me to fuck off and that the colorism issue is played out which was then followed by a fan saying “she (as in me) wants the models to look like theyre from Oaxaca” i dont even have to be Mexican to know that comment was rude, ignorant, and proof that the colorism issue in or community is NOT played out. Lala blocked me and then told the friend who said that about colorism that she loves him and they should see a movie soon. Lol. Lala prides herself on being an LA Latina with a “hood” chola aesthetic but all her models are light skinned/white passing. I will never say that the color of their skin takes away from their latinidad but if her brand is by Latinas and for Latinas, wouldnt she want to be more inclusive and represent all of us? I was very polite to her and never said anything rude or negative but I guess i got to her. Anyway i hope you guys will be able to help me spread the word about the brand. the owner is not a nice lady and seems to agree that colorism is not a present or important issue in our community. In all honesty, she basically just makes the chola aesthetic accessible to white people and cares little about the actual people she claims to be representing. i regret having ever given her my money as a darker skinned Latina but i really thought i was supporting an hermana with a cool vision.
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Rtlt submission

– Rtlt: (thanks for your submission. I’m reblogging as a quote because it’s cleaner and easier to digest.) Colorism is a huge problem within the Latinx community and it’s upsetting to hear that someone from our community is dismissive and unwilling to listen to any critique that points out a very colonialist, anti-black, anti-indigeneous, mentality that continues to exist. it’s a shame really and peculiarly ironic considering Ms. Romero markets to an audience that is often marginalized by the fashion industry. It would be beyond hypocritical to applaud and support a brand for pushing boundaries and acknowledging a sect that is often underrepresented when in reality theyre reinforcing the same tired, racist ideals already established by conventional mainstream fashion industry.

The other night I politely asked Lala Romero why the models of her LA based clothing brand “Bella Doña” are only light skinned and she told me to look at the timeline again and not ask such a dumb question. Then her friend told me to fuck off and that the colorism issue is played out which was then followed by a fan saying “she (as in me) wants the models to look like theyre from Oaxaca” i dont even have to be Mexican to know that comment was rude, ignorant, and proof that the colorism issue in or community is NOT played out. Lala blocked me and then told the friend who said that about colorism that she loves him and they should see a movie soon. Lol. Lala prides herself on being an LA Latina with a “hood” chola aesthetic but all her models are light skinned/white passing. I will never say that the color of their skin takes away from their latinidad but if her brand is by Latinas and for Latinas, wouldnt she want to be more inclusive and represent all of us? I was very polite to her and never said anything rude or negative but I guess i got to her. Anyway i hope you guys will be able to help me spread the word about the brand. the owner is not a nice lady and seems to agree that colorism is not a present or important issue in our community. In all honesty, she basically just makes the chola aesthetic accessible to white people and cares little about the actual people she claims to be representing. i regret having ever given her my money as a darker skinned Latina but i really thought i was supporting an hermana with a cool vision.

Rtlt: thanks for your submission. Colorism is a huge problem within the Latinx community and it’s upsetting to hear that someone from our community is dismissive and unwilling to listen to any critique that points out a very colonialist, anti-black, anti-indigeneous, mentality that continues to exist. it’s a shame really and peculiarly ironic considering Ms. Romero markets to an audience that is often marginalized by the fashion industry. It would be beyond hypocritical to applaud and support a brand for pushing boundaries and acknowledging a sect that is often underrepresented when in reality theyre reinforcing the same tired, racist ideals already established by conventional mainstream fashion industry.