worlds market

everyone still talking about ackee well thats just fine. but youre going to miss my live mukbang and i didnt spend $125 in world market’s food section for nothing

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So Pepsi had Kendall Jenner uniting the world and then Heineken pulls this. Good show, Heineken, good show. 

The inhumanity of capitalism sees people arguing that natural disasters, situations in which people lose everything they have and struggle to stay alive with limited resources, is the “perfect time” for price gouging [the practice of raising prices to astronomical levels to take advantage of increased demand].

In this article, the author argues that places raising the price of water to freaking $100 means that “only those who actually need it will buy it”, allowing the price-gouge to serve as a means of rationing and distribution….not once taking into account those who simply can’t afford such gouges or the simple freaking fact that such barbaric and ruthless economic tactics display the absolute worst that humanity has to offer.

Because at the end of the day, the safety of “the market” is far more important that those who are struggling to survive in the wake of a natural freaking disaster.

The barbaric author then goes to argue in the comments that “sufficiently high prices” will miraculously allow supplies to enter into the storm-ravaged areas…because if enough money is offered, “people will find a way”. He basically argues that high enough prices will lead people to more likely risk their own lives to bring in more goods to profit off of the suffering of others through price-gouging in times of disaster……….and that somehow, this practice makes the world [and market!!] a better place for all.

“rationing by price”, ensuring that only the rich survive or that the poor are forced to choose between dying or giving up everything they have just to get through a disaster.

This is absolute lunacy paraded as a “logical economics” and it’s infuriating.

I’m at least glad that there are several people in the comments section of his article ripping him a new one.

WITCHY PSA

Guys, if you haven’t heard about the magical store known as World Market, let me educate you.

this place is SO COOL

It’s like a witchy Ikea. It has a food, home decor, furniture, and there’s a whole GODDAMN SECTION FOR CANDLES.

Most things are from around the world. You can find soap from France, Japanese sodas, etc.

Not to mention, for my tea witches, I found MULTIPLE cast iron teapots, cast iron, for less than $50, and they’re reasonably sized. You can go to Teavana and find teapots like them that are more than half the size and almost triple the price.

There were also incense cones, AN ASS-LOAD of tea (and coffee) in the back, as well as a lot of cool trinkets.

Just go there… you won’t regret it.

theguardian.com
Boxed in: life inside the 'coffin cubicles' of Hong Kong – in pictures
Photographer Benny Lam has documented the suffocating living conditions in Hong Kong’s subdivided flats, recording the lives of these hidden communities

The photographs highlight the reality of Hong Kong’s housing crisis, where tens of thousands of people live in these cramped conditions because they can’t afford anything else

this is what being ranked number 1 ‘freest economy’ means

buzzfeed.com
The Problem With Rupi Kaur's Poetry
The milk and honey author's use of unspecified collective trauma in her quest to depict the quintessential South Asian female experience feels disingenuous.
By Chiara Giovanni

This is a really well written look into Rupi Kaur and her place in the literary world, how she markets herself to different audiences, and how she aims to present an image of South Asian women. I highly recommend people with opinions of her poetry - whether positive or negative - read this. 

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Major Allison Digby Tatham-Warter

He took an umbrella with his kit as a means of identification because he had trouble remembering passwords and felt that anyone who saw him with it would think that “only a bloody fool of an Englishman” would carry an umbrella into battle.

A Company were dropped away from the target of Arnhem Bridge and had to go through Arnhem where the streets were blocked by German forces. Digby led his men through the back gardens of nearby houses instead of attempting to advance through the streets and thus avoided the Germans. Digby and A Company managed to travel 8 miles in 7 hours while also taking prisoner 150 German soldiers including members of the SS. During the battle, Digby wore his red beret instead of a helmet and waved his umbrella while walking about the defences despite heavy mortar fire. When the Germans started using tanks to cross the bridge, Digby led a bayonet charge against them wearing a bowler hat. He later disabled a German armoured car with his umbrella, incapacitating the driver by shoving the umbrella through the car’s observational slit and poking the driver in the eye.

Digby then noticed the Padre pinned down by enemy fire while trying to cross the street to get to injured soldiers. Digby got to him and said “Don’t worry about the bullets, I’ve got an umbrella”. He then escorted the padre across the street under his umbrella. When he returned to the front line, one of his fellow officers said about his umbrella that “that thing won’t do you any good”, to which Digby replied “Oh my goodness Pat, but what if it rains?”

(People always talk about Jack Churchill for his Longsword and Longbow, so I thought as if I should make a post about Digby and his Umbrella.)

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Disneyland Aesthetics - New Orleans Square

Adventureland  New Orleans Square  Critter Country  Frontierland  Fantasyland

I just really love Ditto and so do MC and Yoosung <3

Update: Edited some stuff cos the first version was doing my head in XD

…Give Ditto enough love and it will love you right back ♥ ♥ ♥

This blog 100% supports Loo Brealey, Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat, and ALL the creative talents who have given us “Sherlock”, to do the work as they see fit & to not have to defend their work to, and be harassed by, disappointed, sourpuss knobheads who call their temper tantrums “concern” for character or proper representation.

« People starved under communism ! »

« People starved under capitalism ! »


Yes, you’re both right ! That’s why maybe a healthy balance between the two would be best ?

Some political system where the market is open but there’s still some government oversight to prevent it from doing shitty exploitative things ?


Crazy how the solution isn’t in one of the two extremes but actually nuanced and complex…

Foodie Friday: Pumpkin Spice!

Image from thepioneerwoman.com

Ingredients:
-3 tbsp ground cinnamon
-2 tsp ground ginger
-2 tsp ground nutmeg
-1.5 tsp ground allspice
-1.5 tsp ground cloves

Combine all ingredients! Use in pumpkin pie; pumpkin breads, cookies, and pastries; pumpkin coffee drinks; et cetera!

Chef’s Note: When it comes to spices (especially aromatic ones such as these), it is always best to use whole spices if you can. Carefully toast them in a dry pan until the aroma is strengthened, allow them to cool, and then grind them. This will enhance the flavor and aroma of the spice, giving you the full impact that it has to offer. I personally prefer to use a mortar and pestle (a kitchen one, separate from the one I use for spellwork), which takes more time, but preserves more flavor than a motorized grinder.

Magical Ingredient!

Now, I’ll be the first to admit that this recipe is magical in and of itself. Just the flavor alone is something that I crave and savor all year long. Many times has my boyfriend teased me about being a “basic white girl,” at which point, I often agree. I am that person who loves pumpkin so much that I’m there the first day those lattes come out at Starbucks. But what so few realize is that this spice blend is incredibly simple to make at home (and often tastes better than packaged pumpkin pie spice).

However, while I could go on all day about the magical uses for this blend, it would get rather redundant given previous articles about cloves, cinnamon, and ginger. So instead, I’m going to look at nutmeg!

Sweet, warm, and aromatic, nutmeg has an interesting history that is linked very strongly to imperialism, spice trade, and European colonization. The spice with which we are most familiar today is the seed of the nutmeg tree (myristica fragrans), but in truth, the whole fruit is edible and used in culinary traditions. The fruit is harvested from the tree and used in Indonesian cuisine as manisan, while the seed is dried until it separates from its outer shell. A bright red membrane which surrounds the nutmeg kernel inside is harvested and dried, developing a yellow-red color. This membrane, called the aril, is then sold either ground or whole as another familiar spice: mace.

The seed itself is the nutmeg spice with which we are most familiar - the kernel isolated from the fruit and aril. Sold either whole or ground, it is used in cuisines throughout the world and has a history of being used in many European meat dishes, as well as in pastries and spice blends.

Initially nutmeg, like many other spices involved in the spice trade, was a “trade secret” regarding its location. It grew naturally on the Banda Islands, and was traded with mainland Asia. Eventually, the commodity reached the port of Basra, where it was traded with Muslim sailors. From there, it was spread to the rest of Europe where it was prized for both its flavor and as a protective ingredient against plague.

Like many spices, it was part of what drove the Age of Exploration. By the 16th century, its production origins were discovered by Portuguese explorers. Banda was conquered and its spices - nutmeg, mace, and cloves - were traded with the sailors until the Dutch East India Company claimed the island in 1621 (this was not a particularly pleasant scenario - the indigenous Bandanese were effectively wiped out by European settlers through warfare, starvation, exile, slave trade, or disease).

British control of other Bandanese islands were conceded to the Dutch in exchange for Manhattan and New Amsterdam in colonial America, giving full monopoly over to the Company through much of the 17th and 18th centuries. During the Napoleonic Wars, however, Britain regained temporary control of the islands, and used the opportunity to transplant nutmeg trees to other colonies, establishing new plantations for the trade.

((Fun fact: Many foods cooked in colonial America involved the use of nutmeg as a primary flavoring agent. Vanilla was significantly harder to produce and obtain, but nutmeg was easy to transport and lasted much longer, making it a popular spice in the Americas!))

Today, nutmeg continues to be produced primarily in Indonesia and Grenada, which control the majority of the production of nutmeg and mace in the world market. It’s used in cuisines throughout the world, a wonderful flavoring agent for both sweet and savory foods.

In terms of medicine, nutmeg has traditionally been used to encourage digestion and relieve bowel cramping. Under Elizabethan rule, it was used to help ward off the plague due to its pleasant and calming scent (it was widely believed at the time that odor could carry disease). In modern medicine, nutmeg’s health benefits beyond nutrition are virtually negligible, but has been discovered to cause hallucinations in large doses. This is inadvisable, however, as nutmeg can be toxic in doses of more than one teaspoon. (Do not despair for the recipe above - it’s extremely unlikely that anyone would consume a whole jar of pumpkin spice in one sitting!)

Magically speaking, nutmeg is often associated with wealth, luck, love, and divination. Carrying the whole seed as a charm can bring luck in games of chance (making it quite popular in gambling spells), and can ensure good luck while traveling.

The seed can be carried in a purple sachet or strung on a purple thread as a charm to help encourage favorable decisions in legal matters.

Ground nutmeg has been used for money, divination, and love spells in several traditions - the powder can be added to money drawing powders and sachets, sprinkled into a lover’s shoes to encourage love, or added to drinks which can be consumed prior to meditation and divination to enhance clairvoyance or to be shared with a lover to strengthen relationships.

The essential oil of nutmeg can also be used in money-drawing oils, or warmed to provide the scent of the spice in order to provide comfort, peaceful sleep, and clarity in divination.

In food, as always, the associations carry over. This spice is very versatile, being used in dishes ranging from savory yellow vegetables to meat dishes such as haggis or roast beef. Pair it up with other spices and herbs with similar purposes, and watch the magic come to life!

So when you’re mixing up that pumpkin spice and adding it to your pie this year, be mindful of the history and uses that nutmeg possesses. It is rich and vibrant, both positive and negative. Like all ingredients in food, it is a living ingredient even when dried and ground. It makes for a wonderful experience in working magic into your meals each day!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(

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“The global mentality is moving towards free world trade and increased market liberalism. A world full of opportunities. A world where dreams can come true. It sounds fantastic, and it is fantastic … for a very small percentage of us. But for the vast, poor majority, the capitalist system only means one thing: death and suffering. While we live out our days thoughtlessly, and stuff ourselves with cheap food, the poor people of the Earth struggle in factories. Wages are forced down to the minimum, while the work hours keep increasing. Unionisation is illegal, and the working conditions are intolerable. Before applauding freedom, we must remember one thing: our over-consuming society stands on the shoulders of the coffee beans from Peru. We gorge on cheap food produced by underpaid children’s hands from India.” 

- Jonas Noah Vasquez, SKAM.