world-education

lestercurls  asked:

in response to the last ask: it ya really depends where ur from cause my suburban iowan neighborhood was catholics, lutheran, methodists and maybe a baptist. the GS, at least in my troop, really wanted to focus on diversity outside of the us (like we looked at how girls in africa had their troop meetings). it was probs just cause my mom the troop leader lived all over the world and wanted to educate these white 2nd graders fun fact: girl scouts created the smores

seriously? that’s amazing, good on your mother

and also that’s so cool? go make your smores. carry the tradition. eat some stuff.

I’m crying real trans tears at this…. my whole life I was taught that I was disgusting and unnatural for being trans so to see a kid so openly and happily accept the idea of being gender fluid… I don’t really know how to react other than to just burst into happy tears…
I don’t care if you love or hate Rick Riordan and his writing style, representation is IMPORTANT, especially from such a hugely popular author. Just reading the Magnus Chase series has made me swell with happiness and pride, and seeing it positively effect kids (the target audience cough cough…) is more than I have ever imagined.
Thank you, Rick Riordan, for helping to make the world better by educating our youths, and especially at such a dangerous time.

Tips for Writing Magic

So, as we all know, there are many different kinds of magic — and more being discovered every day as writers create them. It’s true that every world as different and therefore each type of magic created will be different, but following a few of these tips can help you flesh it out just a bit more.

1. Consider your world’s history. Were there ever any major events involving magic or knowledge of it? How has magic proven useful in the past? How much has your culture changed since that time; are its past uses still applicable? Has there been a history of more powerful people having a possession or knowledge of magic?

2. Decide how magic is seen through the eyes of the people. Is it taboo? Dangerous? Helpful? Is it a practice that has to be kept in secret or can it be done anywhere? Are there certain places for it? Consider the people with more knowledge of it: are they seen as wise or dangerous? Are there people with professions dedicated to it?

3. Determine its use in everyday life. Is it used to help complete regular tasks? What about in education? If your world has an education system, what is magic’s importance within it? Are there everyday items that posses magic? Are these items considered benevolent or evil? Can items be enchanted to help around the house, or is magic reserved only for things of major importance?

4. Think about the people using it. Is there a general age range for people using it? If the range is broad, are there common uses for each age group? More than age, is there a general social status of people with access to it? Is there a stereotype that follows these people? Or a wealth level? Or even an appearance?

So, those are all the magic tips I’ve got for you today. If you’d like to see me cover a topic, be sure to drop a message in my ask box; see you next time with another writing post!

I came across this poster on Queen St. West in Toronto and I couldn’t look away. Posters such as these, strategically placed around the city are pushing people to question Canada’s dark, colonial history, as is the incredibly critical art being produced by Indigenous artists such as Kent Monkman and Rebecca Belmore. These artists, activists, thinkers and interventionists are destabilizing and dismantling biased, historical Canadian narratives.

In the decade or more of being in Canada, I have recently had the opportunity to establish close allyships with Indigenous friends. Through their research and lived experiences, I am learning about a side of Canada that I was not initially aware of. While the Canadian Citizenship book discusses our shameful history of residential schools, it presents a watered down version, summarized in undignified, short lines, mostly ending with, “Canada has since apologized.”

The abuse that was carried out on Indigenous children at these schools (the last residential school closed in 1996) was horrific and conveniently left out of textbooks. With more awareness around the topic, Canada’s internationally positive reputation is being challenged. Canada’s deputy minister of Indian Affairs Duncan Campbell Scott was quoted in 1920 to have said: “Our object is to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic.”

While an apology by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is a start, it is not enough. After all, actions speak louder than words. Grave injustices have been committed against Indigenous people. Erasure of language, culture and customs so as to benefit and serve colonial systems of oppression, unsolved cases of thousands of missing, murdered Indigenous women, increased likelihood of sexual assault on Indigenous women, an alarmingly high suicide rate amongst Indigenous youth and deplorable living conditions in some parts of Canada where Indigenous people reside. By deplorable I mean run down schools and homes and no access to clean, drinking water. How can we justify this while being one of the wealthiest countries in the world with a global reputation for excellence in living standards and human rights?

Far too often I hear fellow immigrants from my own community refer to Indigenous people as “drunks” and “criminals.”

“Oh these natives, they’re such a menace to Canadian society.”

“They get so much funding from the government. All their schooling is paid for.”

“They should be grateful and move on from the past. Look at the state of poor people in the third world countries we come from.”

“These people don’t know the first thing about oppression. They take all the money the government gives them and waste it on drugs and alcohol.”

It is ironic to see new immigrants settle on Canadian land while demonizing and othering the original custodians of this land.

Indigenous people have been dealing with institutionalized racism, discriminatory legislation and federal under-funding for over 100 years. As we mark our 150th birthday as a nation today, I hope that we can work toward addressing these important and urgent issues. Indigenous people are bearing the brunt of genocidal, colonial policies while the rest of us immigrating to Canada are reaping immense benefits such as world class healthcare and education, services that many of our Indigenous communities lack full access to. Our indifference and lack of awareness around these pressing matters has dire consequences for First Nations, Metis and Inuit people of Canada.

Today, on Canada’s 150th, I am stating a land acknowledgment for the first time in all these years of living, working, giving to and taking from Canadian land.

***I wish to acknowledge this land on which I currently reside and work. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people and I am grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land. (Please correct me if I have stated this land acknowledgment inaccurately)

As a tribal daughter of the Indigenous Magsi clan in Balochistan, Pakistan, I stand in solidarity with my Indigenous brothers and sisters in Canada.

I wish you a safe, peaceful and more informed #Canada150 long weekend.

Artwork Asks
  • Mona Lisa: Do you like to look neat and orderly? How long does it take for you to get ready for the day?
  • Starry Night: Do you enjoy watching the sky and daydreaming?
  • The Scream: How easy/hard is it for someone to startle or make you lose focus?
  • The Persistence of Memory: Do some people consider you to be a weird or strange person?
  • Girl with a Pearl Earring: Do you like to wear jewelry? What are your favorite pieces of jewelry and approximately how much are they worth?
  • The Last Supper: Are you religious at all?
  • Guernica: Is the world "Black and White" to you?
  • American Gothic: Would you like to lead a simple and happy life? Or do you prefer adventure?
  • The Creation of Adam: What is your favorite story from Mythology? Do you have any favorite Fables or Fairytales?
  • The Birth of Venus: Do you like to be in the spotlight?
  • David: Are you the bold type? Do want your ideas and thoughts to be heard all around the world?
  • A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte: Do you take time out of your day to kick back and relax? Where can people find you if so?
  • No. 5, 1948: Do you tend to break away from traditions and cultural norms? Are you the rebellious type?
  • Pietà: Name something that tugs at your heartstrings.
  • Venus De Milo: Do you believe that everyone deserves a second chance, no matter what they've been through in the past?
  • The Thinker: Do you often find yourself getting lost in thought? What is it usually about?
  • The Great Wave off Kanagawa: Do you like the Ocean?
  • Water Lily Pond: What are your favorite flowers?
  • Capitoline Wolf: What is your relationship with animals? Do you like them? What is your favorite animal?
  • Winged Victory of Samothrace: Do you strive to meet your goals and never give up on them?
  • Nighthawks: Are you a night owl or a early bird?
  • Lady with an Ermine: Do you have any pets? Would you like to have pets? If so, what would your dream pet be?
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog: Do you tend to get lost easily?
  • Napoleon Crossing the Alps: Are you a brave and daring individual? Would you fight for freedom if you had to?
  • The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp: Do you value your ability to get an education?
  • Christina's World: Is there anything you long for?
  • Washington Crossing the Delaware: Do you want to make an impact on this world? What do you want to be remembered for?

I kind of love that Even & Eskild are the last people we see from Isak’s point of view. Eskild was there for him from the beginning, providing him with a comfortable home, never pushing him, never outing him, being there for him when he felt his whole world fell apart, educating him on pride but also being so understanding of why he made the comments he did. Then there is Even who made Isak feel so happy, so loved, and so comfortable that he was finally ready to be his true self.

Hockey Fan Starter Kit

  1. Chose a team, doesn’t matter which one, you’ll be called a bandwagoner regardless.
  2. Prepare yourself for at least 10 mental breakdowns, 50 if your team is in the playoffs.
  3. Don’t try the understand the calls because the refs are blind and the rules are a more like guidelines.
  4. Get yourself a beer or wine or any other drink you can turn to when the game infuriates you.
  5. It’s called a penalty box, but I call it a pout palace.
  6. Don’t expect to understand what goalie interference is. It’s like big foot; it might exists but you never see it.
  7. Like goalie interference, offsides is called when its pulled from the ‘stupid reason to blow the play dead’ hat.
  8. You boo Bettman. Doesn’t matter when, where, or what he’s doing - you boo. He feeds of it, like an unpopular hockey vampire.
  9. Pierre McGuire is the Hermione of the hockey world; very smart and educated but occasionally overshares.
  10. Phil Kessel is a stanley cup champion and that’s the only thing you need to know.
  11. Goalies are precious and have never done a single thing wrong. Love them, they’re marshmellow optimus primes.
  12. Fighting isn’t fighting, unless fights are classified as hugging matches to see can squeeze the hardest.
  13. Mike Millbury is the white crayon of hockey; no one wants him and no one cares about what he does.
  14. Don’t throw your jersey onto the ice, it’s rude and (unless you got a small loan of one million dollars from your dad) expensive.
  15. The bond between tendy and defendy is v. strong. Don’t question it.
  16. Finally, have fun. Shit talk other teams, be a die hard fan but don’t be a dick. We already have one Steve Simmons, we don’t need another.
Mine (Jungkook x Reader)

Admin: Mimi

Prompt/Ask: Hello! Could I request a Jungkook smut where he gives you a very rough spanking becuase you obliviously made him jealous. Like it wasn’t on purpose, it was because you are way too innocent and didn’t realize you made him jealous. Please, if you are unconfortable, just let me know and I’ll change my request

-AND-

Hai!! Could you do a smut with jungkook where he gets jealous of the other members being around/comfortable with you XD make em super possessive during the nasty, love😩💕

Fandom: BTS

Genre: Smut

Pairing: Jungkook x Reader

Warnings: spanking, language?, sex (obviously lmao)

Word Count: 3809

Authors Note: Woahh, so this is the first smut I’ve written holy moly (ravioli ravioli give me the formuoli lmao) so I hope this was good enough! I kinda made it CEO!Jungkook, because I drew inspiration from the gif (I could stare at it for days oml halp), and I also combined two asks I got for Jungkook since they were similar. I hope I did my bias justice and wrote a good smut for him lol. Enjoy, as always, and feedback is appreciated! If there are any errors please let me know! Happy reading ^^

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Islam isn’t a violent religion any more than Christianity is.
(Twitter: MuslimIQ)

This was directed at a white supremacist, but it’s a good response for the Bill Maher Liberals in your life too, especially the atheists.  The Angry White Man brand of Liberal Atheist Absolutism is probably one of my least favorite factions among people I generally agree with, because it always comes with a condescending air of I’m Right And You’re Wrong.  Things are this or they are that, and because I am an educated white man, I am smart, and I don’t have to listen to your rebuttals to whatever I just said.  One of their hot button issues is religion, wherein all religions are stupid and terrible, but Islam is the worst because it makes people violent.

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I and most of my friends are working or studying in fields that rely heavily on US government funding and support. A week ago, we knew we were future archaeologists, historians, conservation biologists, policymakers, environmental scientists, diplomats, park rangers; now some of us don’t know what we are. For so many, it feels like the rug has been totally pulled out from under us. More so if your dream job was actually in government (like mine), or if you’re a veteran who could’ve expected to benefit from federal veteran’s employment initiatives, or if you’re a research scientist or grad student working on a federal grant funded project, or if you’re a new graduate suddenly plunged into a market where the jobs you’ve prepared for are gone, frozen indefinitely by an administration hostile to their existence.

This isn’t hypothetical angst. Across the US, jobs people were applying for last week are closed. Graduate students whose EPA grants are suspended stand poised to lose not only their work, but their living stipends.

But who gives a fuck about me and my friends, right? Who cares about the futures of we who so foolishly chose to work our asses off to preserve and share our heritage, defend our wild places, support vulnerable populations, understand the forces of nature, create a more sustainable world, alleviate poverty, educate the public, create public policy, and represent our nation? I guess we all should’ve studied to be fucking hedge fund managers.

When the President talked about “bringing back jobs,” which ones was he talking about, exactly?

We should do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian Darwinian theory he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living.
—  Richard Buckminster Fuller aka Bucky Fuller