world-education

I’m crying real trans tears at this…. my whole life I was taught that I was disgusting and unnatural for being trans so to see a kid so openly and happily accept the idea of being gender fluid… I don’t really know how to react other than to just burst into happy tears…
I don’t care if you love or hate Rick Riordan and his writing style, representation is IMPORTANT, especially from such a hugely popular author. Just reading the Magnus Chase series has made me swell with happiness and pride, and seeing it positively effect kids (the target audience cough cough…) is more than I have ever imagined.
Thank you, Rick Riordan, for helping to make the world better by educating our youths, and especially at such a dangerous time.

I kind of love that Even & Eskild are the last people we see from Isak’s point of view. Eskild was there for him from the beginning, providing him with a comfortable home, never pushing him, never outing him, being there for him when he felt his whole world fell apart, educating him on pride but also being so understanding of why he made the comments he did. Then there is Even who made Isak feel so happy, so loved, and so comfortable that he was finally ready to be his true self.

Artwork Asks
  • Mona Lisa: Do you like to look neat and orderly? How long does it take for you to get ready for the day?
  • Starry Night: Do you enjoy watching the sky and daydreaming?
  • The Scream: How easy/hard is it for someone to startle or make you lose focus?
  • The Persistence of Memory: Do some people consider you to be a weird or strange person?
  • Girl with a Pearl Earring: Do you like to wear jewelry? What are your favorite pieces of jewelry and approximately how much are they worth?
  • The Last Supper: Are you religious at all?
  • Guernica: Is the world "Black and White" to you?
  • American Gothic: Would you like to lead a simple and happy life? Or do you prefer adventure?
  • The Creation of Adam: What is your favorite story from Mythology? Do you have any favorite Fables or Fairytales?
  • The Birth of Venus: Do you like to be in the spotlight?
  • David: Are you the bold type? Do want your ideas and thoughts to be heard all around the world?
  • A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte: Do you take time out of your day to kick back and relax? Where can people find you if so?
  • No. 5, 1948: Do you tend to break away from traditions and cultural norms? Are you the rebellious type?
  • Pietà: Name something that tugs at your heartstrings.
  • Venus De Milo: Do you believe that everyone deserves a second chance, no matter what they've been through in the past?
  • The Thinker: Do you often find yourself getting lost in thought? What is it usually about?
  • The Great Wave off Kanagawa: Do you like the Ocean?
  • Water Lily Pond: What are your favorite flowers?
  • Capitoline Wolf: What is your relationship with animals? Do you like them? What is your favorite animal?
  • Winged Victory of Samothrace: Do you strive to meet your goals and never give up on them?
  • Nighthawks: Are you a night owl or a early bird?
  • Lady with an Ermine: Do you have any pets? Would you like to have pets? If so, what would your dream pet be?
  • Wanderer above the Sea of Fog: Do you tend to get lost easily?
  • Napoleon Crossing the Alps: Are you a brave and daring individual? Would you fight for freedom if you had to?
  • The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp: Do you value your ability to get an education?
  • Christina's World: Is there anything you long for?
  • Washington Crossing the Delaware: Do you want to make an impact on this world? What do you want to be remembered for?
Tips for Writing Magic

So, as we all know, there are many different kinds of magic — and more being discovered every day as writers create them. It’s true that every world as different and therefore each type of magic created will be different, but following a few of these tips can help you flesh it out just a bit more.

1. Consider your world’s history. Were there ever any major events involving magic or knowledge of it? How has magic proven useful in the past? How much has your culture changed since that time; are its past uses still applicable? Has there been a history of more powerful people having a possession or knowledge of magic?

2. Decide how magic is seen through the eyes of the people. Is it taboo? Dangerous? Helpful? Is it a practice that has to be kept in secret or can it be done anywhere? Are there certain places for it? Consider the people with more knowledge of it: are they seen as wise or dangerous? Are there people with professions dedicated to it?

3. Determine its use in everyday life. Is it used to help complete regular tasks? What about in education? If your world has an education system, what is magic’s importance within it? Are there everyday items that posses magic? Are these items considered benevolent or evil? Can items be enchanted to help around the house, or is magic reserved only for things of major importance?

4. Think about the people using it. Is there a general age range for people using it? If the range is broad, are there common uses for each age group? More than age, is there a general social status of people with access to it? Is there a stereotype that follows these people? Or a wealth level? Or even an appearance?

So, those are all the magic tips I’ve got for you today. If you’d like to see me cover a topic, be sure to drop a message in my ask box; see you next time with another writing post!

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ACTION ALERT: ALL REPTILE KEEPERS

On the heels of what was another successful educational event at the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center here in Baton Rouge, it literally *KILLS ME* to see this posted by Kevin McCurley of NERD in response to what is now a HUGE threat to Zoos, Aquariums, and individuals like myself and my fiance who have dedicated our personal and professional lives to showing children and adults the wonders of the reptile world through safe educational outlets. THIS is why it is so important to pay close attention to what you say, what you post, and how you portray your animals! From Kevin:

Keep reading

I and most of my friends are working or studying in fields that rely heavily on US government funding and support. A week ago, we knew we were future archaeologists, historians, conservation biologists, policymakers, environmental scientists, diplomats, park rangers; now some of us don’t know what we are. For so many, it feels like the rug has been totally pulled out from under us. More so if your dream job was actually in government (like mine), or if you’re a veteran who could’ve expected to benefit from federal veteran’s employment initiatives, or if you’re a research scientist or grad student working on a federal grant funded project, or if you’re a new graduate suddenly plunged into a market where the jobs you’ve prepared for are gone, frozen indefinitely by an administration hostile to their existence.

This isn’t hypothetical angst. Across the US, jobs people were applying for last week are closed. Graduate students whose EPA grants are suspended stand poised to lose not only their work, but their living stipends.

But who gives a fuck about me and my friends, right? Who cares about the futures of we who so foolishly chose to work our asses off to preserve and share our heritage, defend our wild places, support vulnerable populations, understand the forces of nature, create a more sustainable world, alleviate poverty, educate the public, create public policy, and represent our nation? I guess we all should’ve studied to be fucking hedge fund managers.

When the President talked about “bringing back jobs,” which ones was he talking about, exactly?

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Islam isn’t a violent religion any more than Christianity is.
(Twitter: MuslimIQ)

This was directed at a white supremacist, but it’s a good response for the Bill Maher Liberals in your life too, especially the atheists.  The Angry White Man brand of Liberal Atheist Absolutism is probably one of my least favorite factions among people I generally agree with, because it always comes with a condescending air of I’m Right And You’re Wrong.  Things are this or they are that, and because I am an educated white man, I am smart, and I don’t have to listen to your rebuttals to whatever I just said.  One of their hot button issues is religion, wherein all religions are stupid and terrible, but Islam is the worst because it makes people violent.

Keep reading

Teachers must ditch ‘neuromyth’ of learning styles, say scientists

Teaching children according to their individual “learning style” does not achieve better results and should be ditched by schools in favour of evidence-based practice, according to leading scientists.

Thirty eminent academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology have signed a letter to the Guardian voicing their concern about the popularity of the learning style approach among some teachers.

They say it is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging as it can lead to a fixed approach that could impair pupils’ potential to apply or adapt themselves to different ways of learning.

The group opposes the theory that learning is more effective if pupils are taught using an individual approach identified as their personal “learning style”. Some pupils, for example, are identified as having a “listening” style and could therefore be taught with storytelling and discussion rather than written exercises.

The academics say the learning style approach is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Polynesian Beliefs in Fantasy

Hello!

I’m thinking of working on a fantasy novel about mermaids.  The mermaids are various ethnicities and will be from regions like the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean.  I am from the Caribbean and feel like I understand the nuances of Caribbean culture, but I don’t think I’ll have the same understanding of other cultures.  I have two questions:

1) Is it problematic to include Polynesian mythology from across many Pacific Islands?  Or would it be more respectful to include mythology from one culture instead?  

2) Is using Polynesian mythology problematic in general, and if so would including something like folklore be more respectful?   

I would like to include aspects of various cultures, but if some things are problematic I might decide to include an ethnically diverse cast and either come up with my own ideas for the mermaids’ culture or have the mermaids culture be more influenced by nature/the environment.

I’d appreciate any opinions on this.  Thank you for your help! 

Note- I am not Polynesian and have a tendency to miss a few things about the various Polynesian cultures, because I only know it from anthropology. So grain of salt!

  1. I’d say it 100% depends on how well you can represent each culture. There’s nothing inherently wrong with it, but opinions are split on tokenism and homogenization. If you feel you could accurately represent multiple cultures without going “look at how diverse my world is and how educated I am!”, then go for it. Even if you just end up showing one, you can hint at others within the plot of the novel. I’d personally love to see more knowledge about the diversity within Indigenous groups in published works.
  2. I tend to take issue with the word “mythology” for Indigenous beliefs, because mythology tends to apply to “dead or exotic” things in the West. Indigenous beliefs are religions that are still alive. But, different groups/people have different preferences, so that word could be completely fine.

But as for just generally using Polynesian beliefs? It completely depends if you have permission to use them. Some parts of Polynesian beliefs are closed (like… don’t go giving characters tattoos willy nilly. Those are very sacred things that have detailed processes to determine what they are and who gets them), but nothing’s stopping you from exploring.

When in doubt, ask. If you get a yes, then go for it. If you get a “modify,” modify it according to their instructions. If you get a no, then rework.

Hope this is helpful!

~Mod Lesya